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Tim Cook holds company-wide Town Hall, talks iPhone dependence, benefits, pipeline & India

In the days following Apple’s record Q1 earnings announcements, Apple CEO Tim Cook and other top Apple executives held a Town Hall meeting at the Infinite Loop headquarters in Cupertino to reveal new announcements and take attendee questions.

Multiple sources in attendance at the event said that Cook as well as newly appointed Chief Operating Officer Jeff Williams each spoke and made announcements and teases related to new employee benefits, future iPad growth, Apple Watch sales, future retail stores in China, Apple Campus 2, and the future product pipeline.

Cook also fielded questions from the audience, attempting to reduce concerns related to the company’s iPhone dependence, discussing porting more Apple services to Android, growth in India, and releasing cheaper iPhones to appease growing markets.

Cook reportedly began his talk by putting Apple’s revenue announcements in context. He said that Apple sold enough iPhones in the holiday quarter (74.8 million units) to cover the populations of New York, London, Beijing, and Shanghai. Cook also called the Apple Watch one of the “hottest” holiday gifts, and he claimed that sales of the device exceeded those of the original iPhone in its first holiday quarter in 2007.

In response to the slowdown in iPad sales, Cook said he expects iPad revenue growth to return by the end of 2016. Cook noted that he is especially bullish on the iPad line, and sources in attendance said that Cook actually read his presentation notes off of an iPad Pro. Apple is preparing to release a new iPad next month. Cook also praised the fourth-generation Apple TV by noting that Apple sold more set-top boxes than ever during the holiday quarter.

Moving on to future products, Cook reportedly said that the new Apple TV and the tvOS sets the stage for a “bright” future for Apple in the living room. Apple has been working on a cable-replacement service, but the latest reports have indicated multiple stalls in the process.

Cook also noted his excitement over future products coming out of the software, services, and hardware divisions, while teasing some “far-off” hardware announcements coming beyond this year. Cook said that Apple is using Apple Music on Android as a way of testing the waters for growing its services division through other platforms, opening up the door for more porting in the future.

He also touched upon the new Cupertino Apple Campus 2, noting that Apple employees will likely first begin moving into the new campus by the end of January 2017. He emphasized how important the new theater will be in giving Apple flexibility to hold larger events on its own campus versus relying on places in San Fransisco or San Jose. Cook reportedly called the new campus a “gift” to the future of Apple employees.

Also on the topic of new Apple employee benefits, Cook said that Apple would soon be announcing a pair of time-off benefits for Apple employees.

First, Apple employees will now be granted up to four weeks of paid leave if they need to take care of an ill family member. Additionally, Apple’s extended maternity and paternity benefits from fall 2014 will now be available in most of Apple’s operating countries outside of the United States. Apple Retail head Angela Ahrendts is said to have added that Apple is working on new solutions for retaining employee talent across the company.

Jeff Williams also spoke briefly on the subject, touching upon Apple’s work in the supply chain. Williams reportedly said that Apple will soon announce that all of its smelted metals for products used across 2015 and beyond are either completely conflict-free or coming from smelting partners that are are amid validation for becoming wholly conflict-free.

Lastly, Cook touched upon questions involving Apple’s dependence on the iPhone and how India and other emerging markets play into the company’s future.

Cook is said to have called the iPhone the “greatest business of the future,” noting that Apple has room to grow the iPhone for decades. He menitoned that 4G LTE networks are not in every emerging market, and this gives Apple the opportunity to push its latest devices to regions like India. Cook called India one of Apple’s most important growth areas for the next decade, noting that Apple is in early preparations to bring its retail stores to the country.

Cook said that he continues to to consider China key to Apple’s future and that the company plans to open up its 40th store in China by the end of the summer. He also noted that Apple believes it does not need to release a cheaper, less feature-packed iPhone to appease growing markets. Instead, he said, Apple’s research indicates that people across these regions are willing to spend more for a better experience.

(Top image: Reuters)


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices Tagged: Android, Angela Ahrendts, Apple Store, Apple watch, china, India, iPad, iPhone, Jeff Williams, Tim Cook, Town Hall

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Mark Gurman

February 4th

Apple

Mac

Apple reportedly building secret research team to develop virtual and augmented reality tech

During this week’s earnings call, Apple CEO Tim Cook answered a question on virtual reality by saying “I don’t think VR is a niche…It’s really cool and has some interesting applications.” It looks like Cook’s statements have some background to them. According to a new Financial Times report, Apple had reportedly been prototyping VR headsets in the past under Steve Jobs in the mid-2000s, but the project was eventually abandoned once the technology was found to still be immature. With new acquisitions and a dedicated VR team, the effort is said to be once again a new focus.

Apple has been going on a hiring spree in the world of virtual reality as of 2013 with their acquisition of PrimeSense. Reportedly the VR/AR research unit at Apple has hundreds of staff from multiple previous acquisitions including past employees from Microsoft’s HoloLens team as well as Lytro.

With their latest acquisition reportedly being Flyby Media, a company that worked with Google in developing some of the 3D positioning software for Project Tango, it looks like Apple is reinvigorated to taking this new direction seriously.

This has been an interesting two-weeks behind Apple’s VR news as Doug Bowman, a top virtual and augmented reality researcher, was recently hired by Apple to help expedite the efforts for the platform. Although Apple’s Jony Ive told the New Yorker that the face was the “wrong place” to put technology, the secret research unit at Apple is said to have been building prototypes of possible headset configurations in the past several months.

In regards to the face being the wrong location for the technology, it’s worth noting that Apple was also hiring hardware engineers to work on display and projection systems for VR environments. Although consumer VR has relied on headsets in the past few years, there’s no reason pieces of these technologies can’t be brought to other environments that implement VR in smaller ways. A year ago Apple was also reported to have been developing a 3D iPhone display.

The report goes on to claim that Apple is moving foward by building out the secret VR/AR team at the company. Earlier this week, 9to5Mac’s Chance Miller opined about the state of VR and how Apple should increase its role in the space. Now it looks like that may actually be a reality. You can read the full report here.

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Filed under: iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: Apple, AR, Augmented reality, Doug bowman, Flyby Media, iOS, Jonathan Ive, Lytro, Microsoft, Project Tango, Tim Cook, Virtual reality, vr

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Greg Barbosa

January 29th

Apple

Mac

Tim Cook meets with European Commission antitrust chief ahead of possible $8B tax bill

Tim Cook in Augsburg, Germany inspecting panels for Apple Campus 2

Tim Cook this week met with the European Commission’s antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager, Bloomberg reports and Kristin Huguet, a spokeswoman at Apple, confirms. The Cupertino based company is fighting back against contentions that they have formed a special agreement with Ireland in which they pay significantly lower taxes to the country’s government. The news also appears to coincide with Tim Cook’s announcement in launching an iOS development center in Italy.

Having already agreed to settle a $347 million claim by the Italian tax office, Cook’s tweet in regards to the first iOS development center has definitely piqued some interest today. If the ruling declares that Apple and Ireland’s agreement is illegal, Ireland would be at legal fault, but Apple would owe the billions in back taxes. So it comes as no surprise that the Irish Prime Minister has chimed in defending the relationship; the one in which Apple would be seen introducing 1,000 jobs by mid-2017.

The tax pressure is only stacked with the encryption/privacy debate being mounted by the likes of AT&T’s CEO, who stated this week that encryption policies should be in the government’s hands, not the company’s. It’s worth nothing that Apple isn’t the only company being investigated here, with Starbucks Corp. and Fiat Chrysler amongst others, but Apple is definitely the most valuable in sheer monetary worth.

While we’ve been reporting on the Apple overseas tax controversies for a few months now, this new information feels timely considering this is the week of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Apple likely has some presence here, where various leaders in business and politics come together to discuss the world’s most pressing issues, considering the other European news coming out of the company.

Whether or not this week’s meeting will ultimately help Apple and the prospect of a massive tax bill remains to be seen.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Europe, European Commission, Ireland, Kristin Huguet, Margrethe Vestager, Tax, tax bill, Taxes, Tim Cook

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Greg Barbosa

January 21st

Apple

Mac

AT&T CEO calls for Congress to decide on encryption policy, says it’s not Tim Cook’s decision

Randall-punch-tim-cookAT&T CEO Randall Stephenson is the latest to weigh in on the issue of data encryption policy with the executive telling The Wall Street Journal that Apple CEO Tim Cook and other tech execs should leave the decision making on encryption policy up to Congress:

“I don’t think it is Silicon Valley’s decision to make about whether encryption is the right thing to do. I understand Tim Cook’s decision, but I don’t think it’s his decision to make”… I personally think that this is an issue that should be decided by the American people and Congress, not by companies,”

…The AT&T chief said his own company has been unfairly singled out in the debate over access to data. “It is silliness to say there’s some kind of conspiracy between the U.S. government and AT&T,” he said, adding that the company turns over information only when accompanied by a warrant or court order.

That statement follows a meeting among Cook, other Silicon Valley executives and White House officials last week to discuss topics related to encryption policies and government access to data.

And that’s just the latest occasion in which Apple under Tim Cook’s leadership has voiced its opinion on the issue with the company becoming increasingly vocal about its stance on encryption and sharing user data with others.

But the issue is once again in the spotlight as it becomes a topic of interest during recent presidential debates. Tech companies and government access to data was one focus at the Democratic debate this week, and just days earlier Apple and Tim Cook were mentioned by name during the Republican presidential debate with candidates asked specifically about Cook’s position on keeping user data private from government.

Recent legislation proposed in at least two states — New York and California — looks to ban iPhone sales if Apple won’t compromise on encryption, which shows you just how heated the debate has gotten.


Filed under: AAPL Company, Tech Industry Tagged: AT&T, Congress, Encryption, privacy, Randall Stephenson, Security, Tim Cook

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Jordan Kahn

January 21st

Apple

Mac

California bill over encryption backdoors could prevent Apple from selling iPhones on its home turf

iphone-6-iphone-6s-plus (2)

California is now presenting a new bill that, if passed into law, would stop Apple from selling iPhones on its home turf, via ZDNet. The bill requires smartphone manufacturers to sell devices that have backdoors to allow them to be decrypted. Naturally, this affects iPhones which use high-strength security methods and make it practically impossible for anyone including Apple to gain access without the passcode. If this proposed bill sounds familiar, there’s a reason for that. A nearly identical proposition was made in New York state earlier in the month.

Although the bill is only being proposed and isn’t law at this time, it poses a big issue for Apple which is facing pressure from politicians across the US to relax its stance on privacy in favor of security. The California case is especially problematic given the location of Apple’s HQ. It would be very awkward if Apple was barred from selling iPhones in the state where they’re designed.

If the bill came into effect as written, anyone caught buying an iPhone as it exists today would be fined $2,500 per device. In fact, the bill actually backdates to sales made since July 2015.

Tim Cook and Apple has repeatedly taken a hard-line stance on privacy. Most recently, Cook met with White House officials to encourage them to back Apple. Cook wants government to plainly state that there should be a ‘no backdoors’ ruling regarding consumer electronics. These proposed bills in California and New York fly in the face of that policy.

Along similar lines, the UK is also considering anti-encryption legislation. The Investigatory Powers Bill would require Apple to make ways for iOS devices to be unlockable, letting governments freely access user data with a warrant. For now, the conflict between technology companies and government oversight continues.


Filed under: iOS, iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: Encryption, policy, Security, Tim Cook

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Benjamin Mayo

January 21st

Apple

Mac

Apple sponsoring Super Bowl host committee with free products and equipment but declined to be included in marketing

ARTICLE_SB50

The Super Bowl kicks off on February 7th at Levi’s Stadium, in close vicinity to the headquarters of major tech firms including Apple. Usually, the Super Bowl is funded by local government sponsorships. This year, tech companies are (at least partially) footing the bill. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Apple has contributed free products and equipment to the host committee and has explicitly declined any company or product marketing in exchange. Apple joins other tech companies like Alphabet, Yahoo, Seagate and HP in funding the proceedings — the Super Bowl committee has raised about $50 million in total from these firms.

Why Apple wants to sponsor essentially in secret (having turned down opportunities for logo placement) is unclear. In Yahoo News on Friday, it was reported that Apple was helping out simply because it was the right thing to do:

“Our sponsors will get a lot of attention in the Bay Area because they stepped up early to be a part of this,” says Bruce. “Apple was the very first company of all our sponsors to step up. And the reason they did that is because they realized that it was important to Silicon Valley. It was during a bit of a transition time from Steve [Jobs] to Tim [Cook], and they told us, ‘This is the right thing to do. We’re building a mega campus that will be a stone’s throw from the stadium.’ They have no interest in the marketing rights, they have no interest in using our logo. But they’re promoting the partnership a lot internally to their employees.”

The motivation for other businesses is obvious: Uber is advertising ‘official’ NFL transport at the event as a way to promote its taxi services. In return for the financial support, sponsors are allowed to use the NFL logo mark in their own advertising around the event. However, it appears Apple is not interested in that either. Apple believes its logo is more influential than the NFL’s and if anything, the NFL should be paying Apple to use its trademarks.

If you ask Bruce, Apple doesn’t much care about the rights to the NFL logo anyway. “Their opinion,” he says, “is that the NFL should pay them for the right to use their mark. Because their mark is more valuable than the NFL shield.”

Although Apple is a sponsor through this deal, they are not necessarily involved with the game itself. There is some speculation that this arrangement means Apple will run an advertising commercial during the Super Bowl this year but it is not guaranteed. Apple was rumored to run a Super Bowl commercial in 2014 for the 30th anniversary of the Mac, but this never transpired.

Alas, nothing will be as iconic as the 1984 ad, arguably one of the world’s most notable Super Bowl ads ever.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtvjbmoDx-I


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: Apple, sponsor, Super Bowl, Tim Cook

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Benjamin Mayo

January 19th

Apple

Mac

Apple sponsoring Super Bowl host committee with free products and equipment but declined to be included in marketing

ARTICLE_SB50

The Super Bowl kicks off on February 7th at Levi’s Stadium, in close vicinity to the headquarters of major tech firms including Apple. Usually, the Super Bowl is funded by local government sponsorships. This year, tech companies are (at least partially) footing the bill. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Apple has contributed free products and equipment to the host committee and has explicitly declined any company or product marketing in exchange. Apple joins other tech companies like Alphabet, Yahoo, Seagate and HP in funding the proceedings — the Super Bowl committee has raised about $50 million in total from these firms.

Why Apple wants to sponsor essentially in secret (having turned down opportunities for logo placement) is unclear. In Yahoo News on Friday, it was reported that Apple was helping out simply because it was the right thing to do:

“Our sponsors will get a lot of attention in the Bay Area because they stepped up early to be a part of this,” says Bruce. “Apple was the very first company of all our sponsors to step up. And the reason they did that is because they realized that it was important to Silicon Valley. It was during a bit of a transition time from Steve [Jobs] to Tim [Cook], and they told us, ‘This is the right thing to do. We’re building a mega campus that will be a stone’s throw from the stadium.’ They have no interest in the marketing rights, they have no interest in using our logo. But they’re promoting the partnership a lot internally to their employees.”

The motivation for other businesses is obvious: Uber is advertising ‘official’ NFL transport at the event as a way to promote its taxi services. In return for the financial support, sponsors are allowed to use the NFL logo mark in their own advertising around the event. However, it appears Apple is not interested in that either. Apple believes its logo is more influential than the NFL’s and if anything, the NFL should be paying Apple to use its trademarks.

If you ask Bruce, Apple doesn’t much care about the rights to the NFL logo anyway. “Their opinion,” he says, “is that the NFL should pay them for the right to use their mark. Because their mark is more valuable than the NFL shield.”

Although Apple is a sponsor through this deal, they are not necessarily involved with the game itself. There is some speculation that this arrangement means Apple will run an advertising commercial during the Super Bowl this year but it is not guaranteed. Apple was rumored to run a Super Bowl commercial in 2014 for the 30th anniversary of the Mac, but this never transpired.

Alas, nothing will be as iconic as the 1984 ad, arguably one of the world’s most notable Super Bowl ads ever.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtvjbmoDx-I


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: Apple, sponsor, Super Bowl, Tim Cook

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Benjamin Mayo

January 19th

Apple

Mac

Apple at center stage of Republican presidential debate over encryption & national security

Tim Cook Stage

Apple’s strong position on privacy and encryption has been at odds with the United States government’s pressure to step up its national security efforts in the wake of recent terrorist attacks across the globe. In short, iPhones are encrypted to protect customer data from prying eyes, and law enforcement agencies believe that gives criminals a safe haven for communication that can’t be traced.

The Obama administration including the former and current attorney general and FBI director have strongly voiced opposition to Apple’s position, and Tim Cook reportedly pressed the White House to back strong encryption as recently as this week. So it’s no surprise that Tim Cook and Apple came up at the end of last night’s Republican presidential debate hosted by the Fox Business channel where at least one candidate was asked to address his position on the subject.

Specifically, Apple Watch aficionado and former Florida governor Jeb Bush, who responded similarly to how the current administration has thus far, was asked how he’d handle Tim Cook and encryption by Fox Business host Neil Cavuto. Let’s take a look at his response with a little help from TIME’s transcript:

CAVUTO: Governor Bush, fears have gripped this country obviously, and you touched on it earlier since the San Bernardino attacks. Since our last debate, the national conversation has changed, according to Facebook data as well.

Now this first graphic shows the issues that were most talked about right before those attacks and now after: the issues of Islam, homeland security and ISIS now loom very large. The FBI says Islamic radicals are using social media to communicate and that it needs better access to communication. Now the CEO of Apple, Governor, Tim Cook said unless served with a warrant private communication is private, period. Do you agree, or would you try to convince him otherwise?

BUSH: I would try to convince him otherwise, but this last back and forth between two senators — back bench senators, you know, explains why we have the mess in Washington, D.C. We need a president that will fix our immigration laws and stick with it, not bend with the wind.

The simple fact is one of the ways, Maria, to solve the problem you described is narrow the number of people coming by family petitioning to what every other country has so that we have the best and the brightest that come to our country. We need to control the border, we need to do all of this in a comprehensive way, not just going back and forth and talking about stuff —

CAVUTO: Would you answer this question?

BUSH: Oh, I’ll talk about that, too. But you haven’t asked me a question in a while, Neil, so I thought I’d get that off my chest if you don’t mind.

(LAUGHTER)

Governor Bush did add that Apple should have some “liability release” if loosening encryption goes bad, although Tim Cook’s stake on privacy thus far seems more about principle and not lawsuits. (My guess is it might be legally more tricky in the case of law enforcement as we’re seeing play out.)

CAVUTO: Fair enough. So Tim Cook — so Tim Cook says he’s going to keep it private.

BUSH: I got that. And the problem today is there’s no confidence in Washington, D.C. There needs to be more than one meeting, there needs to complete dialogue with the large technology companies. They understand that there’s a national security risk. We ought to give them a little bit of a liability release so that they share data amongst themselves and share data with the federal government, they’re not fearful of a lawsuit.

We need to make sure that we keep the country safe. This is the first priority. The cybersecurity challenges that we face, this administration failed us completely, completely. Not just the hacking of OPM, but that is — that is just shameful. 23 million files in the hands of the Chinese? So it’s not just the government — the private sector companies, it’s also our own government that needs to raise the level of our game.

We should put the NSA in charge of the civilian side of this as well. That expertise needs to spread all across the government and there needs to be much more cooperation with our private sector.

CAVUTO: But if Tim cook is telling you no, Mr. President.

BUSH: You’ve got to keep asking. You’ve got to keep asking because this is a hugely important issue. If you can encrypt messages, ISIS can, over these platforms, and we have no ability to have a cooperative relationship —

Governor Bush then alluded to that idea that even if the US government required Apple to open up its tight encryption and let law enforcement officials peek at data, there’d still be the issue of terrorists using foreign companies as alternative platforms.

CAVUTO: Do you ask or do you order?

BUSH: Well, if the law would change, yeah. But I think there has to be recognition that if we — if we are too punitive, then you’ll go to other — other technology companies outside the United States. And what we want to do is to control this.

We also want to dominate this from a commercial side. So there’s a lot of balanced interests. But the president leads in this regard. That’s what we need. We need leadership, someone who has a backbone and sticks with things, rather than just talks about them as though anything matters when you’re talking about amendments that don’t even actually are part of a bill that ever passed.

CAVUTO: Governor, thank you.

The bottom line seems to be that this debate isn’t going anywhere, a compromise may not be possible by design, and we’ll continue to see this national conversation continue just as it has for months now. My colleague Ben Lovejoy put his stake in the ground a couple of months ago on the whole debate.

Original image source via CNN


Filed under: iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: Apple, Attorney General, Encryption, FBI, governement, iPhone, Jeb Bush, National Security, President Obama, privacy, Tim Cook, US, White House

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Zac Hall

January 15th

Apple

Mac

A proposed bill in New York would force Apple to allow backdoor access to user data, or be fined

lead-iphone-3

A new bill proposed in New York could see that all phone manufacturers be required to implement a way for law enforcement agencies to access and decrypt user devices. This bill is somewhat similar to the Investigatory Powers Bill currently being debated in the UK, which Apple has voiced its opposition towards. Apple and Tim Cook have repeatedly stated that government agencies should not have any access to user devices or data, whether be through a built-in backdoor or other means.

The bill making its way through the New York state assembly specifically states that “any smartphone manufactured on or after January 1, 2016, and sold or leased in New York, shall be capable of being decrypted and unlocked by its manufacturer or its operating system provider.” Should a phone manufacturer neglect to implement such a tool, the assembly would impose a $2,500 fine for each infringing device (via On The Wire).

While this bill theoretically doesn’t give government agencies direct access encrypted data, Apple implementing such a measure would force it to compromise its stance that there should not be a sacrifice in privacy for national security. In the past, Tim Cook has stated that any decrease in encryption, which this bill would require, would lead to unintended people gaining access to user data.

The Investigatory Powers Bill in the UK is similar and has the support of UK Prime Minister David Cameron. Like the New York bill, the Investigatory Powers Act would also mean that Apple would have to stop encrypting iPhones, iMessage, and FaceTime and hold a key with direct access to user data, again creating a backdoor.

Just last week, Tim Cook and other Silicon Valley executives met with White House officials to discuss the use of social media and technology in the fight against terrorism, radicalization, and propaganda. During the meeting, Cook again voiced his stance that there should be in no way, shape, or form, a backdoor to user data. The Apple CEO urged that it is up to the White House to make that ruling and enforce a “no backdoor” policy.

In the past, Apple has said that it has no way to access data on devices that are passcode protected by the user. In response to that, the Department of Justice came out and said that Apple should be required to unlock any encrypted data because iOS is “licensed, not sold” to customers.

The next step for the New York state bill would be a move to the floor calendar, followed by votes in the assembly and senate. Part of the bill reads as follows:

“The safety of the citizenry calls for a legislative solution, and a solution is easily at hand. Enacting this bill would penalize those who would sell smart- phones that are beyond the reach of law enforcement.

The fact is that, although the new software may enhance privacy for some users, it severely hampers law enforcement’s ability to aid victims. All of the evidence contained in smartphones and similar devices will be lost to law enforcement, so long as the criminals take the precaution of protecting their devices with passcodes. Of course they will do so. Simply stated, passcode-protected devices render lawful court orders meaningless and encourage criminals to act with impunity.”


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Encryption, iOS, legal, New York, Tim Cook

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Chance Miller

January 14th

Apple

Mac

Apple Watch political oopsies: Jeb Bush’s ‘Batphone’ interrupts interview, Nancy Pelosi’s makes SOTU cameo

Jeb Bush Apple Watch

It’s no secret that former Florida governor Jeb Bush is a huge fan of his Apple Watch. Since the Apple Watch launched, the Republican presidential candidate has gone after the youth vote by showing off his Apple Watch and calling it a better option than Obamacare, despite labeling it unintuitive and power-hungry a few months later.

Jeb’s “iWatch,” as he often calls it, wasn’t dead earlier this week during an interview with the Des Moines Register’s editorial board, USA Today points out, as the presidential hopeful accidentally either placed or answered a phone call on it unknowingly. Jeb explained it away to the Iowa paper by declaring that he’d never had his “bat phone” turn on. Thankfully there’s video of this genuinely amusing moment.

And on the other side of the political aisle, Democratic Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi gave her own Apple Watch an equally entertaining product endorsement during President Obama’s State of the Union address last night …

The former Speaker and current Minority Leader of the US House of Representatives was caught on camera glancing and tapping her Apple Watch during the President’s last SOTU address to Congress. As Jeb would likely point out, Pelosi’s Apple Watch not needing a recharge after 9 pm at night is impressive on its own. My guess is this was a stand alert toward the end of the hour and some odd minutes long speech, but give us your best guesses too.

And while Washington DC’s finest are thumbing around their Apple Watches this week, Apple CEO Tim Cook met behind closed doors with President Obama in a private meeting among White House officials and Silicone Valley execs to discuss national security and encryption. Cook’s position is unsurprising for anyone keeping up with this debate as we learned last night that he’s holding his position on strong encryption and no back doors despite government pressure to make exceptions for law enforcement officials.

Now back to those fantastic Apple Watch uh-ohs from Jeb Bush and Nancy Pelosi:


Filed under: Apple Watch Tagged: Apple watch, iWatch, Jeb Bush, Nancy Pelosi, Tim Cook

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Zac Hall

January 13th

Apple

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