Tags terahertz

Judge a book through its cover with this terahertz camera setup

mit-closed-books-1_0 What do you do if you want to peek inside a book, but you’re pretty sure it’ll crumble into dust if you even crack the cover a little bit? Well, nothing: opening a book is a critical step in finding out what’s inside. Or at least it was until someone at MIT decided that shouldn’t be the case. Read More

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Devin Coldewey

September 10th

Gadgets

Scientists Make Wi-Fi Twenty Times Faster [Science]

If you're never content with Wi-Fi speeds, rest assured that scientists are trying to help. In fact, a team of Japanese researchers has just broken the record for wireless data transmission in the terahertz range—with a data rate 20 times higher than most current Wi-Fi connections. More »


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Jamie Condliffe

May 16th

Uncategorized

Your next smartphone may be able to see through walls

A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas, led by Professor of Electrical Engineering Dr. Kenneth O, have created a technology that could allow future smartphones and cameras to see through walls. The research brought together two scientific advances, one that involves tapping into an unused range in the electromagnetic spectrum and another that deals with a new microchip technology. The terahertz band of the spectrum needed for this technology to function has not been accessible for most consumer devices, however the team is looking to change that.

“We’ve created approaches that open a previously untapped portion of the electromagnetic spectrum for consumer use and life-saving medical applications,” said Dr. O. “The terahertz range is full of unlimited potential that could benefit us all.” Thanks to a new approach, images can be created in the terahertz band without using several lenses inside a device, instead requiring a single CMOS technology censor.

“CMOS is affordable and can be used to make lots of chips,” Dr. O said. “The combination of CMOS and terahertz means you could put this chip and receiver on the back of a cellphone, turning it into a device carried in your pocket that can see through objects.” Due to privacy concerns, however, Dr. O and his team are focused on uses in the distance range of less than four inches.

The technology could be used for finding studs in walls, authenticating important documents and detecting counterfeit money. “There are all kinds of things you could be able to do that we just haven’t yet thought about,” Dr. O concluded.

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Dan Graziano

April 20th

Uncategorized

Terahertz bandwidth: the key to 1,000x faster smartphones, laptops and pipe dreams

Much like carbon nanotubes and quantum computing, terahertz technologies have been promising miracles for nearly as long as humans have been able to distinguish water from fire. We exaggerate, but barely. A crafty team assembled at the University of Pittsburgh seems to have no qualms with moving forward, however, recently announcing a new physical basis for terahertz bandwidth. Those involved managed to have success in generating a frequency comb -- "dividing a single color of light into a series of evenly spaced spectral lines for a variety of uses -- that spans a more than 100 terahertz bandwidth by exciting a coherent collective of atomic motions in a semiconductor silicon crystal." For those who managed to make it through the technobabble, we're told that the ability to modulate light with such a bandwidth could "increase the amount of information carried by more than 1,000 times when compared to the volume carried with today's technologies." Smartphones, computers and even airline check-in kiosks that operate 1,000 faster than they do today? Sure, we'll take that. But, how about give us a ring when Wally World deems it ripe for commercialization? We'll be waiting -- pinky promise.

Terahertz bandwidth: the key to 1,000x faster smartphones, laptops and pipe dreams originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 12 Mar 2012 21:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

March 13th

Uncategorized

Forget 3G and 4G, terahertz could make cell phones 1,000 times faster

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh announced that they have discovered a means of wirelessly transmitting data thousands of times faster than current standards, PCMag reported on Wednesday. The team is led by Hrvoje Petek, a physics and chemistry professor at the university, who has theoretically found a way to transmit data between devices in the terahertz frequency. Petek’s discovery of “a physical basis for terahertz bandwidth” could potentially be used to leverage the “portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between infrared and microwave light” and transmit data at rates 1,000 times faster than today’s wireless standards, which are limited to the gigahertz frequency. “The ability to modulate light with such a bandwidth could increase the amount of information carried by more than 1,000 times when compared to the volume carried with today’s technologies,” Petek said. “Needless to say, this has been a long-awaited discovery in the field.”

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Dan Graziano

March 9th

Uncategorized

Wireless Data Could Move 1,000 Times Faster Thanks to Frequency Combs [Wireless]

That 4G connection pumping through your New iPad may seem lighting-quick compared to the 3G molasses you were used to, but LTE flows about as fast as old glass in the face of the Terahertz bandwidth that the University of Pittsburgh is studying. More »


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Andrew Tarantola

March 8th

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