Tags Senate

Apple joins Google, Microsoft and others in an open letter declaring anti-encryption bill ‘unworkable’

Just a day after a prominent legal expert described the proposed anti-encryption Burr-Feinstein bill as unconstitutional, unenforceable and harmful, Apple has called the proposal ‘well-intentioned but ultimately unworkable.’

The description is in an open letter from the Reform Government Surveillance coalition, of which Apple is a key member, alongside companies such as Google, Dropbox, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter. The letter, addressed to the two Senators behind the proposed bill, explains why it would be harmful to the interests of both the U.S. people and American businesses …

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Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: AAPL, Apple, Burr-Feinstein Bill, Congress, Encryption, FBI, Feinstein-Burr Bill, Inc, iPhone, Reform Government Surveillance, Senate

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Ben Lovejoy

April 20th

Apple

Mac

Apple joins Google, Microsoft and others in an open letter declaring anti-encryption bill ‘unworkable’

Just a day after a prominent legal expert described the proposed anti-encryption Burr-Feinstein bill as unconstitutional, unenforceable and harmful, Apple has called the proposal ‘well-intentioned but ultimately unworkable.’

The description is in an open letter from the Reform Government Surveillance coalition, of which Apple is a key member, alongside companies such as Google, Dropbox, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter. The letter, addressed to the two Senators behind the proposed bill, explains why it would be harmful to the interests of both the U.S. people and American businesses …

more…


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: AAPL, Apple, Burr-Feinstein Bill, Congress, Encryption, FBI, Feinstein-Burr Bill, Inc, iPhone, Reform Government Surveillance, Senate

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Ben Lovejoy

April 20th

Apple

Mac

Bill to force Apple & others to decrypt devices reaches draft stage, but Senator vows filibuster

A proposed law that would force Apple and other tech companies to decrypt devices for law enforcement agencies has reached the stage of a draft bill – but one Senator has vowed to filibuster it. A filibuster is when a parliamentarian makes a lengthy, uninterrupted speech which results in running out of time to debate the bill, causing it to fail.

The Senate Intelligence Committee first proposed to introduce the bill in February, and the FBI lent its support by briefing two sponsoring Senators. However, many lawmakers oppose the bill, and it has been reported that the White House will not publicly support it.

The Verge now reports that one Senator has pledged to filibuster the bill if it gets as far as a Senate debate …

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Filed under: iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: Apple, Congress, Encryption, FBI, Filibuster, iPhone, San Bernardino, Senate, Senator Ron Wyden

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Ben Lovejoy

April 14th

Apple

Mac

Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren Are Fighting for Cheaper Internet

Internet-loving Americans have been waiting way too long for a team of benevolent juggernauts in Washington to take on massive money-hungry cable companies. This week, four freedom-fighting senators took their first swing in the form of a strongly worded letter to the Federal Communications Commission. The message was clear: Bring down broadband prices.

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Adam Clark Estes

July 10th

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Why Congress Can Sell Off Our National Forests, But Not National Parks

Republican senators want to sell your National Forests, Wildernesses and Wildlife Refuges. But they can't sell your National Parks, Monuments or Preserves. Here's how all the different types of public land are different. And why you should care.

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Wes Siler

April 13th

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Senator on Internet Policy Subcommittee Has “Never Sent an Email”

US Senator and delicate southern flower Lindsey Graham has, in his own words, never sent an email in his life. He also just so happens to be a member of the Senate Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law. Naturally.

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Ashley Feinberg

March 9th

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8 Dumb Quotes About Science From New NASA Overseer Ted Cruz

8 Dumb Quotes About Science From New NASA Overseer Ted Cruz

The new Republican-led Congress is currently busy picking people to chair its many committees and subcommittees. Guess what! Tea Party hero Senator Ted Cruz is the new chair of the Subcommittee on Space, Science and Competitiveness. That means he will oversee NASA. Yep—the climate-denying Tea Party hero who tried to defund NASA is now in charge of NASA.

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Adam Clark Estes

January 12th

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Apple, Google, Facebook, other tech companies lobbying to stop NSA spying before new congress takes over in January

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Bloomberg reports that groups representing Apple, Google, Facebook and other high profile tech companies are lobbying to pass a new bill that attempts to limit NSA spying of email and communications of their users. The report says the groups are “pushing the Senate to pass legislation limiting National Security Agency spying before the Republican majority takes control of the chamber.” The news comes ahead of the Senate vote on the new bill scheduled for Nov. 18 and an upcoming Republican controlled Congress taking over in January:

If a final bill isn’t reached this year, the process for passing legislation would begin over in January under a new Congress controlled by Republicans, many of whom support government surveillance programs… Members of the Consumer Electronics Association “have already lost contracts with foreign governments worth millions of dollars,” in response to revelations about U.S. spying, Gary Shapiro, president and chief executive officer of the group that represents Apple, Google and Microsoft, wrote in a letter sent to all senators yesterday.

The new bill would reportedly help curb NSA data collection programs by requiring the agency obtain court orders for data requests to carriers and allowing companies to disclose more information on government requests they receive. “The bill also would require the government to narrow its surveillance, forbidding authorities from collecting all information about a particular service provider, or from collecting geographic data like a city, ZIP code or area code,” Bloomberg reports. 

Apple and many of the other tech groups opposed a previous bill passed in May due to an “unacceptable loophole” that it said “could enable the bulk collection of Internet users’ data.”

Here’s to hoping the new bill, if passed, extends to the recently discovered government program using planes equipped with devices posing as cellular towers to collect data from passengers. 


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Congress, Facebook, Google, January, NSA, republican, Senate, spying

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Jordan Kahn

November 14th

Apple

Mac

Senate bill passes bringing regulated post-contract cell phone “unlocking” closer to reality

iphone-5s-hero-l-201311iPhone users could soon finally be able to easily use any supported carrier at the end of their service contract without having to jump through hoops or use other means to unlock the device. That is if a proposed bill currently processing through Congress passes and becomes law.

The Hill reports that the mentioned bill, the Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act, cleared through the Senate after a vote on Tuesday through a ‘unanimous consent agreement’ and will next move to the House for a vote before potentially becoming law after first being introduced last year.

If the bill does indeed become law, consumers will easily be able to take an iPhone purchased through one carrier on contract and have the option to unlock the device and use it on another carrier after the contract expires.

Current rules and processes for unlocking devices vary from carrier to carrier and even contract to contract in certain instances, and as it stands now, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act prohibits legally unlocking a carrier-restricted device.

The Hill’s report notes Senator Patrick Leahy’s previous statements on the current policy explaining why he introduced the legislation:

“This straightforward restoring bill is about promoting consumer rights,” Leahy said when the bill was introduced last year. “When consumers finish the terms of their contract, they should be able to keep their phones and make their own decision about which wireless provider to use.”

Unlocked devices can be purchased outright avoid the restrictions of contracts and carrier-locked devices, but in the case of the iPhone, the cost goes from $199 to $649 with most carrier subsidies.


Filed under: AAPL Company, Tech Industry Tagged: Digital Millennium Copyright Act, Hill, iPhone, Leahy, Patrick Leahy, Senate, SIM lock, Wireless Competition Act

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Zac Hall

July 16th

Apple

Mac

E-Label Act wants to remove unsightly regulatory symbols from the back of your mobile devices

iPhone-5S-03

Those pesky regulatory symbols on the back of your smartphone or tablet may soon be going digital if a new bill being presented to the US Senate gets approved. The E-Label Act is a bipartisan bill that would give electronics manufacturers the option to use digital stamps instead of branding devices with government-mandated tattoos.

The Senate Commerce Committee says that removing physical symbols from devices would reduce costs for manufacturers, which could ultimately lower prices for consumers. If approved, this act would not affect all emblems covering devices, as icons like the “CE” stamp are for gadgets sold in Europe. However, FCC branding for products sold in the US could be replaced by a digital logo viewable from a device’s screen.

(via The Hill)


Filed under: Tech Industry Tagged: E-Label Act, FCC, Senate

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Mark Hearn

July 11th

Apple

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