Tags PatentApplication

Apple patent app details ‘active packaging,’ a new level of window shopping

apple active media packaging
Apple's generally not one to go overboard with packaging; a simple white box with a few unmistakable logos is just about all it takes to get the point across. But in a future world -- one where people have digitized skin and NFC readers in their fingernails -- we'll obviously need something with a bit more... flamboyance. A patent application originally filed on December 12th, 2011 (and just made public today) details an "active electronic media device packaging," which outlines a method for packaging gizmos in a box that "may include one or more electrical traces in-molded or printed onto the packaging."

It gets a little ambiguous from there, but it sounds as if "one or more wireless power techniques" may be tapped into in order to keep marketing material humming when folks walk by. Speaking of which, the app also explains that POM sensors could be used to "detect various movements events," potentially activating as prospective consumers stroll by. To reiterate, an application for a patent doesn't mean that any of this stuff will get close to coming to fruition, but if you'd like to make absolutely sure you don't live in a world where products call to you from the shelves, we heard Sir Richard Branson can assist.

Apple patent app details 'active packaging,' a new level of window shopping originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 05 Apr 2012 12:35:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

April 5th

Apple

Google patent app details method for generating a ‘ghost profile,’ a world of anonymous G+ users

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Google hasn't exactly had the easiest time keeping the privacy hawks off of its back, but if a recently published patent application is any indication of its future intentions, well... let's just say we could see a lot more people hiding behind an online veil. Made public today, Google's most recent patent app details a "system and method for generating a ghost profile for a social network," which would -- in theory, at least -- allow a user to use certain features in a social network without converting to a social network profile. For those curious, the ghostly profiles would be unsearchable, and comments that originated from said profiles would be shown as being from "partial names." The real question: are G+ ghosts allowed in the Facebook compound?

Google patent app details method for generating a 'ghost profile,' a world of anonymous G+ users originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 29 Mar 2012 20:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

March 30th

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Microsoft patent application details branded web browser frame

Originally filed in the halcyon days of 2010, the United States Patent and Trademark Office has just published a web browser-centric patent application from the fine folks in Redmond. Microsoft's "Branded Browser Frame" app details a "computer-readable storage media" that can be specifically executed (presumably by surfing over to a website that's capable of handling said execution), and then used to present a varying interface based on what the underlying instructions are telling it to do. According to the independent claims put forth, we're told about a "control layout area... wherein one of the selected controls comprises a website-branded control that serves as a website's homepage button, and a navigation control that provides an input field."

In lay terms, that sounds a lot like a browser function that would enable many of the typical graphical elements we see atop our URL bars today to be adjusted and dynamically tweaked based on inputs from whatever address it was currently on. We aren't putting words in the applicant's mouth, but we're envisioning a top bar in Internet Explorer that turns red and features DVDs as the forward and back buttons when surfing over to Netflix.com (perhaps a stretch, but you catch the drift). IE9 does a bit of that color changing today, but it's possible that more is in store. Naturally, it'll take some time to see if this here app is actually granted, and it's possible that it'll look / function quite differently in its final form, but there's no doubt that someone at Microsoft is dreaming about a sexier (if not more sellable) browser bar.

Microsoft patent application details branded web browser frame originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 15 Mar 2012 13:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

March 15th

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Eye-Fi CEO slams SD Association’s eerily similar Wireless SD card standard, says his IP is being violated

Yuval Koren is not pleased. For those unaware, he's the CEO of Eye-Fi, the company that has practically written the rules on embedding WiFi into SD cards. If you blinked last week, you probably missed the SD Association's announcement that it had created a new Wireless LAN SD standard that would effectively give just about anyone the ability to add Eye-Fi abilities to their SD cards. As it turns out, Eye-Fi's none too pleased about it, and Koren has gone so far as to publicly admit that the standard is seriously infringing upon highly valuable Eye-Fi technology. To quote: "As [the SDA's standard is] currently written, essential Eye-Fi patented technology would be violated by anyone implementing this draft specification." Bold.

He goes on to explain that his company has invested "tens of millions of dollars and several years to create unique technology that lets people wirelessly transfer photos and videos directly from their camera and mobile devices," and calls the SDA protocol "flat out misrepresentation." He's effectively calling for the SD Association to either pony up and license Eye-Fi's tech, or scrap the "standard" and rewrite it using something else altogether. The full letter is posted up after the break, with absolutely no elation to be found.

Continue reading Eye-Fi CEO slams SD Association's eerily similar Wireless SD card standard, says his IP is being violated

Eye-Fi CEO slams SD Association's eerily similar Wireless SD card standard, says his IP is being violated originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 20 Jan 2012 23:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

January 21st

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