Tags Patent application

Apple patent application shows how Force Touch could in future simulate more than just clicks

Apple's existing Force Touch mechanism

Apple’s existing Force Touch mechanism

An Apple patent application published today shows that the Force Touch trackpad used in the 12-inch MacBook and latest 13-inch MacBook Pro could get more sophisticated in future versions. The patent describes how a mix of vibration and temperature could fool your finger into ‘feeling’ different surfaces, such as metal and wood.

For example, a glass surface may be controlled to have the temperature of a relatively cooler metal material and/or a relatively warmer wood material […]

In some cases, the temperature may be varied over time, such as in response to one or more touches detected using one or more touch sensors. For example, a metal material may increase in temperature while touched in response to heat from a user’s finger.

The patent describes how vibrations could be used to simulate a textured surface, such as the grain of a wooden surface … 

From the description in the patent, the vibration would appear to use a similar taptic engine to the existing Force Touch trackpad, but allowing horizontal as well as vertical movement. A Peltier device or similar would be used to create temperature differences. A Peltier device is a solid-state heat pump that can transfer heat from one side of the device to the other depending on the direction of the current, allowing both heating and cooling effects.

patent

The extremely realistic feel of the existing Force Touch trackpad’s fake click makes it easier to imagine how Apple might be able to pull off this more sophisticated tactile illusion. It would, though, be a little ironic for Apple to work so hard to remove visual skeuomorphism, such as fake leather surfaces, only to potentially reintroduce it in tactile form!

KGI’s Ming-Chi Kuo recently claimed that while the next-generation iPhones will feature pressure-sensitive Force Touch technology, it will work differently to the systems seen in the MacBook and Apple Watch. The illustrations in this patent application show only a MacBook trackpad.

Via AI


Filed under: AAPL Company, Mac Tagged: 12-inch MacBook, Apple Inc, force touch, MacBook, MacBook Pro, Magic Trackpad, Patent, Patent application, Trackpad

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Ben Lovejoy

April 23rd

Apple

Mac

Apple explores customizable layers for future Apple Maps app – new patent application

layersappl

We’re pretty selective in the Apple patent applications we cover here, simply because Apple patents all kinds of things for all kinds of reasons, and for every one of them that makes it into an Apple product, there are hundreds of others that never will. But this is one we think might.

The core concept is nothing new: layered maps. The existing Apple Maps app already allows us to choose between standard mapping, satellite view or both, and Google Maps on the web allows us to switch on or off layers like traffic, weather, public transit lines and so on. But what the Apple patent application describes would, if you’ll excuse the pun, take this idea to a whole new level … 

layersgoog

The existing layering available in Google Maps

An interactive capability enables a user to dynamically adjust the content of an electronic map. Different modes can be chosen to emphasize features relevant to a particular interest, e.g. commuting, tourism, weather, etc. Combinations of modes can be selected to create a customized map. When a search is conducted, the chosen mode functions as a filter for the retrieved results. The map responds to user input directed to a given feature, to display information relevant to that feature. Tapping or clicking on a highway displays the locations of services along the highway, Touching two points on the map causes available routes between them to be computed and displayed to the user, along with relevant data for each route. Geospatial applications can be integrated with the map to provide information pertaining to the area displayed on the map, and to refine search results to those that are relevant to the area.

So, for example, instead of having all roads shown on one layer, you could choose to show only highways when driving across country, or only minor roads when planning a cycle ride. When you have highways selected, you could tap on a road to display only items relevant to that road, such as junctions, gas stations, diners and so on. Getting hungry? Choose a layer that shows only places to eat.

Touch is integral to Apple’s vision of how the layering would work, for example tapping an airport to bring up flight schedules or touching a town to see its population size. Multi-touch would also be used: touch two different points to see the distance between them.

While the patent doesn’t explicitly reference pulling together personalized information such as calendar appointments and hotel reservations, this would be a very obvious application of the concept.

If Apple wants to leave its early glitches (even the beautiful ones) as nothing more than a distant memory, this would be an extremely effective way to go about it.

Via CNET


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Apple mapping, Apple Maps, Apple patent, Apple patents, CNET, Display device, Future of Apple Maps, GoogleMaps, Highway, Map, Patent, Patent application

For more information about AAPL Company, Apple, and Patent continue reading at 9to5Mac.

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Ben Lovejoy

December 19th

Apple

Mac

Apple invents a flexible material to create truly seamless enclosures for MacBooks & other products


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Jordan Kahn

August 22nd

Apple

Mac

Apple invents a flexible material to create truly seamless enclosures for MacBooks & other products

Apple-Flexible-hinge-Macbook-02
Apple-Flexible-hinge-Macbook-01

The US Patent & Trademark Office today published a new Apple patent application (via PatentlyApple) that details a flexible material that could be used as a hinge to create a seamless enclosure for devices like the MacBook, for example. Apple details a technical process of using specialized machinery to laser cut “flex apertures” and interlocking features in a rigid material to allow it to bend and function as a hinge. On top of creating a seamless enclosure, Apple claims the process would allow it to reduce the size of devices that are often increased due to traditional hinge solutions. Imagine if the enclosure of a MacBook didn’t include that black plastic hinge and instead appeared to be a seamless piece of aluminium connecting the display to the bottom half of the unibody.

While MacBooks might seem like the obvious application for Apple’s invention, it also notes the usual list of devices that could potentially use the technology including everything from smartphones to televisions and game consoles. The patent also shows the material being used on headphone cables to allow a flexible connection from the cable to the earbud to prevent damage, and on what appears to be an iPad Smart Cover-like accessory:

Apple-Flexible-earphones-01
Flexible-material-iPad-Smart-Cover

It isn’t the first time Apple has detailed its plans to create more flexible components that could reduce the size of devices and potentially be suitable for a flexible product like a wristwatch. We’ve seen patents for flexible displays, flexible batteries, flexible TRS connectors, and we reported back in April that Apple was looking to hire a display specialist to investigate flexible displays and other emerging display technologies.

Today’s patent application was originally filed in Q1 2013.

For more news on AAPL Company, Apple, and MacBook continue reading at 9to5Mac.

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Jordan Kahn

August 22nd

Apple

Mac

Apple patents unlikely SmartCover wireless charging system

Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 8.00.15 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 8.00.08 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.59.56 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.59.50 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.59.42 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.59.34 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.59.24 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.59.17 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.59.01 AM Screen Shot 2013-03-14 at 7.58.47 AM

However unlikely—the United States Patent and Trademark office today published an Apple patent application that details a system of inductively charging an iPad through the Smart Cover. The idea is that rather than plugging in the iPad, the Smart Cover would include an inductive power transmitter that would allow it to pair with an inductive power transceiver embedded into the iPad. The result is the Smart Cover would become a wireless charging station, connecting to an external power source, and allowing you to power your iPad in various positions. Apple also explained that it could use “ambient power gathering devices, such as solar cells, can be used to gather ambient power (such as sunlight) to be stored internally in the flap for later inductive transfer.”

A method for wireless powering a tablet device, comprising: determining if a protective cover is in a closed configuration with respect to the tablet device; enabling a wireless power receiver circuit in the tablet device when it is determined that the protective cover is in the closed configuration with respect to the tablet device; and wirelessly receiving power from a wireless power transmitter associated with the protective cover.

Apple described the advanced Smart Cover as including multiple power transmitters to allow the iPad to charge even when using the case, for example, as a stand to prop up the device. Alternatively, the cover could continue charging the device when in the closed position or when an iPad is placed on top:

The method as recited in claim 10, the method further comprising: determining that the tablet device is positioned relative to a flat surface at a viewing angle; and enabling a second wireless power receiver circuit only when it is determined that the tablet device is in the portable mode and is positioned relative to the flat surface at the viewing angle and the tablet device is configured to present video by the display.An apparatus for wireless powering a tablet device, comprising: means for determining if a protective cover is in a closed configuration with respect to the tablet device; means for enabling a wireless power receiver circuit in the tablet device when it is determined that the protective cover is in the closed configuration with respect to the tablet device; and means for wirelessly receiving power from a wireless power transmitter associated with the protective cover. 

13. The apparatus as recited in claim 12, the tablet device further comprising; a battery; a display; and a sensor arranged to detect an external stimulus only when the protective cover is in the closed configuration with respect to the display.

The system described in the patent would be similar to wireless charging systems already available on the market, something that Apple’s Phil Schiller recently described as “more complicated” than Apple’s current solution:

As for wireless charging, Schiller notes that the wireless charging systems still have to be plugged into the wall, so it’s not clear how much convenience they add. The widely-adopted USB cord, meanwhile, can charge in wall outlets, computers and even on airplanes, he said. “Having to create another device you have to plug into the wall is actually, for most situations, more complicated,” Schiller said.

Another patent application published today, titled “Digital camera with a light splitter”, would allow Apple to bring true optical zoom to future iOS devices, according to UnwiredView. You can check out more on the patent application here.


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Jordan Kahn

March 14th

Apple

Mac

Is Apple’s iWatch a slap wrist band with a flexible display?

Apple-wristwatch-patent.

iWatch-Concept-slap-bracelet

Concept via Yanko Design

Color us a little skeptical on this one, but the U.S. Patent Office released Patent US 20130044215 filed by Apple (via Patently Apple) on Thursday that basically described a wristwatch-like device. According to the patent application, Apple is looking into methods that integrate flexible components into a bi-stable spring, slap on bracelet design. Apple even highlighted a number of use cases for the accessory that would talk to other electronic devices, i.e., iOS devices, such as viewing recent calls, responding to text messages, managing playlists, and viewing maps:

The bracelet goes far beyond being a wristwatch. Apple states that with a multitouch display, the user “can accomplish a number of different tasks including adjusting the order of a current playlist, or reviewing a list of recent phone calls. A response to a current text message can even be managed given a simple virtual keyboard configuration across the face of the flexible display.”… According to Apple, a larger display is also more desirable for map viewing. The arm mounted location makes map viewing a desirable function for such a device, as a traveler or explorer can easily reference the information with a flick of the wrist while exploring.

The patent application also described a number of methods of powering the wristwatch accessory including the use of a solar panel underneath the display that 9to5Mac discussed before. It also covered the possibility of using kinetic power sources similar to systems already used in wristwatches.

Apple states that the Kinetic energy gathering device noted above in patent figure 5A (# 502) has its advantages. Having the accessory device on an extremity is an ideal location for gathering kinetic energy. The simple motion of a user’s arm or leg allows the accessory device to harness some of that energy for charging battery. The Antenna in patent figure 5A (# 506) is for establishing and maintaining the connection between the bracelet accessory and a portable electronic device such an iPhone. The antenna can be configured to pass data over WiFi, Bluetooth or any other suitable wireless protocol.

Other possible features of the device mentioned in the application include using the device as a nighttime light for bike riding, edge lighting to configure a colored backlit border, and the ability to quickly view maps and high quality video streams. Apple also described an end-detection sensor to deactivate unused portions of the display for individuals with smaller wrists.

Another interesting aspect of the patent application is a method of using built-in accelerometers and gyroscopes as orientation sensors to make sure content is always visible and facing the user as the device—and user’s arm—is in motion.

With all the rumors that Apple is working on a smart watch, it’s hard to ignore a patent application that covers the form factor in such detail. However, it’s important to note many concepts make their way to Apple patents but never see the light of day, and this could very well just be one possible form factor that Apple has experimented with. You can learn more about today’s patent at PatentlyApple. Another image from today’s patent application below:

Apple-wrist-watch.


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Jordan Kahn

February 21st

Apple

Mac

Here’s all of the public information on Apple’s watchmaking activity

Apple-iWatch-Concept-01

Since the old iWatch rumor reared its head again in December, there have been a few more reliable sources adding weight to the idea we could see a smart watch from Apple this year. Over the weekend, The New York Times, which back in 2011 said essentially the same thing, followed up the rumors with a report that Apple is working on a curved glass watch prototype that runs iOS. The Wall Street Journal quickly followed with more info claiming Apple and partner Foxconn are currently testing wearable, watch-like devices.

While many have speculated what Apple might include in an iWatch, including Apple employee #66 and founder of Apple’s Human Interface Group Bruce Tognazzini, all we get from reports is “curved glass” and “iOS”. Apple has clearly been testing wearable prototypes with several patents dating as far back as 2009 describing potential integration with wrist watches and iOS devices. By taking a look at the technology for watches that Apple is already experimenting with through the many publicly available patents, we’ve put together a list of some of the features the company could very well include in an Apple branded smart watch.

Apple-patent-watch-sensorsSensors: The first patent we take a look at was published just today by the US Patent and Trademark Office and detailed by UnwiredView. While Apple mentions devices other than wristwatches in the patent application, it fits in nicely with Tognazzini’s concept of a watch that constantly measures your vital signs for health and fitness applications. The patent goes over various applications for integrating sensors into a wristwatch form factor that could collect data, for example, from a runner or surfer:

“… an accelerometer, one of a strain gauge, force-sensing resistor, piezoelectric strip, humidity or temperature sensor, EKG sensing device, weight-sensing detector, and chemical detector” They will be used to continuously watch and record your movement, heart rate, pulse, pressure, stress etc; and measure temperature, humidity, chemicals, environmental factors and hazardous conditions around you. All this captured data transmitted to what Apple calls an “interrogation device” (ID). This could be your iPhone, iPod or iWatch which connects to the sensor network on you via secure RF links. Apple thinks about putting MMDs and EMDs everywhere

LiquidMetal: When it comes to how an iWatch might look, there is much debate about whether it would go the iPod nano route or instead take design cues from a more traditional watch. One possibility is LiquidMetal. Apple has been patenting a lot of technologies and manufacturing processes related to using Liquidmetal in different form factors since acquiring rights to the amorphous metal alloys. We’ve also already seen the material used before in high end watches (video above), but yet to see the highly versatile material make a major contribution to Apple’s product lines.

Solar: Another possibility for Apple’s smart watch comes from a patent awarded last week for an integrated touch sensor and solar panel. Wireless charging has been brought up as something that could help Apple stand out from the competition with its Curved-Glass-Apple-Patentwatch, but Apple also has many patents that could allow it to integrate a solar panel directly into the display. This is of course also something that we could see in other iOS devices.

Curved glass: According to The New York Times most recent report, Apple’s smart watch will succeed where others haven’t largely due to its process of using curved glass. Apple has several patents that cover unique processes for curving glass for mobile devices. The most recent was published back in December and others earlier last yearThe concept in the image at the top of this article imagine’s a curved 2.5″ OLED, something that looks quite similar to drawings from a patent published in September. Tim Cook doesn’t seem too keen on OLED, but Apple did just pick up OLED expert James Lee from LG.

Cellular: Most seem to think Apple’s iWatch would be a device that talks to other iOS devices for the majority of tasks. That could very well be the case, but will a watch from Apple also function as a standalone device for calls and data? One of Apple’s patents granted last year described a microstrip cellular antenna that could be integrated into a wristwatch and other metal housings. A similar patent also popped up this week.

Foxconn-iPod-Nano-Watch-Strap

Watch strap: Apple could go with a high quality Liquidmetal for the watch’s strap, but it could also have a huge market in inexpensive, interchangeable watch straps like it did with the 6th gen iPod nano. According to the Wall Street Journal, Foxconn and Apple have been testing watch prototypes. One patent coming from Foxconn gives us a look at watch strap that integrates a way to store headphones and an extra battery in the watch’s strap (pictured above).

Other wearable devices: A watch form factor isn’t the only wearable device that Apple has covered in patent applications. Recently Apple filed a patent for high resolution display technology that could be implemented into a Google Glass-like HUD form factor.


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Photo

Jordan Kahn

February 12th

Apple

Mac

Here’s all of the public information on Apple’s watchmaking activity

Apple-iWatch-Concept-01

Since the old iWatch rumor reared its head again in December, there have been a few more reliable sources adding weight to the idea that we could see a smart watch from Apple this year. Over the weekend, The New York Times, which said essentially the same thing in 2011, followed up the rumors with a report that Apple is working on a curved glass watch prototype running iOS. The Wall Street Journal quickly followed with more information, claiming Apple and partner Foxconn are now testing wearable, watch-like devices.

While many have speculated what Apple might include in an iWatch, such as Apple employee #66 and founder of Apple’s Human Interface Group Bruce Tognazzini, all we get from reports is “curved glass” and “iOS”. Apple has clearly been testing wearable prototypes with several patents dating as far back as 2009, describing potential integration with wristwatches and iOS devices. By taking a look at the technology for watches that Apple is already experimenting with through the many publicly available patents, we put together a list of some of the features the company could very well include in an Apple-branded smart watch.

Apple-patent-watch-sensorsSensors: The first patent we look at was published just today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and detailed by UnwiredView. While Apple mentioned devices other than wristwatches in the patent application, it fits in nicely with Tognazzini’s concept of a watch that constantly measures your vital signs for health and fitness applications. The patent goes over various applications for integrating sensors into a wristwatch form factor that could collect data, for example, from a runner or surfer:

“… an accelerometer, one of a strain gauge, force-sensing resistor, piezoelectric strip, humidity or temperature sensor, EKG sensing device, weight-sensing detector, and chemical detector” They will be used to continuously watch and record your movement, heart rate, pulse, pressure, stress etc; and measure temperature, humidity, chemicals, environmental factors and hazardous conditions around you. All this captured data transmitted to what Apple calls an “interrogation device” (ID). This could be your iPhone, iPod or iWatch which connects to the sensor network on you via secure RF links. Apple thinks about putting MMDs and EMDs everywhere

LiquidMetal: When it comes to how an iWatch might look, there is much debate about whether it would go the iPod nano route or instead take design cues from a more traditional watch. One possibility is LiquidMetal. Apple has been patenting a lot of technologies and manufacturing processes related to using LiquidMetal in different form factors since acquiring rights to the amorphous metal alloys. We also already saw the material used before in high-end watches (video above), but have not seen the highly versatile material make a major contribution to Apple’s product lines.

Solar: Another possibility for Apple’s smart watch comes from a patent awarded last week for an integrated touch sensor and solar panel. Wireless charging has been brought up as something that could help Apple stand out from the competition with its Curved-Glass-Apple-Patentwatch, but Apple also has many patents that could allow it to integrate a solar panel directly into the display. This is of course also something that we could see in other iOS devices.

Curved glass: According to The New York Times most recent report, Apple’s smart watch will succeed where others haven’t largely due to its process of using curved glass. Apple has several patents that cover unique processes for curving glass in mobile devices. The most recent was published in December and others earlier last yearThe concept in the image at the top of this article imagined a curved 2.5-inch OLED—something that looks quite like drawings from a patent published in September. Apple CEO Tim Cook doesn’t seem too keen on OLED, but Apple did just pick up OLED expert James Lee from LG.

Cellular: Most seem to think Apple’s iWatch would be a device that talks to other iOS devices for the majority of tasks. That could very well be the case, but will a watch from Apple also function as a standalone device for calls and data? One of Apple’s patents granted last year described a microstrip cellular antenna that could be integrated into a wristwatch and other metal housings. A similar patent also popped up this week.

Foxconn-iPod-Nano-Watch-Strap

Watchstrap: Apple could go with a high quality LiquidMetal for the watch’s strap, but it could also have a huge market in inexpensive, interchangeable watchstraps like it did with the sixth-generation iPod nano. According to the Wall Street Journal, Foxconn and Apple have tested watch prototypes. One patent coming from Foxconn gave us a look at a watchstrap that integrates a way to store headphones and an extra battery in the strap itself (pictured above).

Other wearable devices: A watch form factor isn’t the only wearable device that Apple has covered in patent applications. Recently Apple filed a patent for high-resolution display technology that could be implemented into a Google Glass-like HUD form factor.


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Jordan Kahn

February 12th

Apple

Mac

Apple invents laser projected keyboard & depth perception system, reveals ad-hoc cash dispensing network

Apple-laser-projected-keyboard

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published a couple of interesting patent applications from Apple today. One patent described various embodiments of a depth perception system and laser projection, while another concerned an “ad-hoc cash dispensing network” that would turn iPhone users into walking ATMs.

PatentlyApple first covered the patent and highlighted several possibilities of using cameras and a laser source to determine the distance of an object and implement various applications based on detection of depth. The report explained an embodiment of the invention by describing how Apple could use the system integrated into, for example, an iMac. PatentlyApple also described how Apple could use the invention for laser projected keyboard applications (as pictured above):

In this example, the iMac is able to detect a user approaching it and activate a particular program, application, awake from sleep or power save mode, and the like… In patent FIG. 12, we see a user positioned in front of this future iMac such that the first and second beams 206a, 206b may at least partially intersect the user. The iMac’s updated iSight Camera will be able to determine the distance that the user is from iMac. The depth perception system increases the sensitivity of user detection for the iMac so that it could make a distinction between the user and an occupied chair… In Apple’s patent FIG. 11A shown below, we see the depth perception system incorporated into a mobile electronic device such as an iPad. In this example, the system may be used in combination with a projected control panel 115 (such as a keyboard, audio/video controls, and so on). The control panel 115 may be a light pattern projected from a light source onto a surface (e.g., table or desk), the control panel 115 may include different light shapes, colors, or the like for representing different inputs.

Unwiredview.com pointed us to the “ad-hoc cash dispensing network” patent published today and recently filed by Apple that would essentially allow iOS users to become ATMs for other iPhone users. Just imagine being able to withdraw cash when there simply isn’t an ATM or bank nearby. Apple’s system would allow other close by iPhone users to lend you cash, with the borrowed money returned to the lender through your iTunes account/credit card for a small fee (as pictured in the patent drawing below):

The basic idea, described in a patent applicationAd-hoc cash dispensing network” is pretty simple. Create a cash dispensing server at Apple’s datacenter, to which iPhones, iPads and Macs can connect via a specialized app. Need some quick cash right now and there’s no ATM around? Launch the Cash app, and tell it how much do you need. The app picks up your location, and sends the request for cash to nearby iPhone users.

Apple-ad-hoc-cash-network


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Jordan Kahn

January 31st

Apple

Mac

Apple patent app details ‘active packaging,’ a new level of window shopping

apple active media packaging
Apple's generally not one to go overboard with packaging; a simple white box with a few unmistakable logos is just about all it takes to get the point across. But in a future world -- one where people have digitized skin and NFC readers in their fingernails -- we'll obviously need something with a bit more... flamboyance. A patent application originally filed on December 12th, 2011 (and just made public today) details an "active electronic media device packaging," which outlines a method for packaging gizmos in a box that "may include one or more electrical traces in-molded or printed onto the packaging."

It gets a little ambiguous from there, but it sounds as if "one or more wireless power techniques" may be tapped into in order to keep marketing material humming when folks walk by. Speaking of which, the app also explains that POM sensors could be used to "detect various movements events," potentially activating as prospective consumers stroll by. To reiterate, an application for a patent doesn't mean that any of this stuff will get close to coming to fruition, but if you'd like to make absolutely sure you don't live in a world where products call to you from the shelves, we heard Sir Richard Branson can assist.

Apple patent app details 'active packaging,' a new level of window shopping originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 05 Apr 2012 12:35:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

April 5th

Apple
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