Tags Open source

Google’s Omnitone surround sound project brings us closer to web-based VR

British television presenter Rachel Riley shows a virtual-reality headset called Gear VR during an unpacked event of Samsung ahead of the consumer electronic fair IFA in Berlin, Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber) As has been the case with so many industries, the pendulum of VR will eventually swing back from dedicated apps towards web-based systems — and when that happens, Google will be ready. It published details of a new method for delivering serious surround sound over the web, a system it calls Omnitone. Read More

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Devin Coldewey

July 25th

Gadgets

Bulgaria now requires (some) government software to be open source

Red neon FREE sign Fans of free and open source software are rejoicing today at the news that Bulgaria will now require all software written for the government must be FOSS. But while this is a promising advance, don’t expect a major change in the way things work. Read More

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Devin Coldewey

July 6th

Gadgets

PieMessage open-source project brings iMessage to Android using your Mac as a server

A new open source project called PieMessage enables cross-platform iMessage support, allowing Android users to communicate using Apple’s iPhone messaging platform.

In the video below, we get a short look at the PieMessage app in action with a still unreleased prototype version of the app.

more…


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Android, app, client, GitHub, iMessage, Mac, Open source, PieMessage, server, web, Windows

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Jordan Kahn

May 3rd

Apple

Mac

Windows

IBM brings Swift to the cloud, releases web framework Kitura written in Apple’s programming language

Official image for Swift@IBM

Only months after Apple officially open-sourced Swift, IBM today is announcing that they are bringing Apple’s Swift programming language to the cloud. This makes IBM the first cloud provider enabling Swift application development server-side. IBM has also introduced a preview to a Swift runtime and a Swift Package Catalog to help with code sharing, and distribution.

The packages that access IBM’s Cloud services will help develops using Swift for IBM’s services. Developers that want to take advantage right away can play around in the Swift Sandbox provided by IBM, start building applications on Bluemix and quickly deploy them, or begin creating and sharing packages to the Swift Package Catalog.

IBM’s announcement today comes with the news that they are also releasing a web framework written in Swift named Kitura. The framework would allow developers to build end-to-end applications, deploy, and collaborate on web services and applications written in Swift. Kitura allows developers to build front-end and back-end code using Swift as the programming language to help simplify modern application development.

IBM Swift Sandbox

IBM’s Swift Sandbox, originally released three months ago, allows developers to experiment with Swift on the IBM server and collaborate with peers across multiple browsers and devices. This is very similar to Xcode’s own Playgrounds, but by running it within the browser developers can get a better understanding of their code compatibility with IBM’s cloud services.

For a list of all the resources at IBM dedicated to IBM, be sure to check out Swift @ IBM. Kitura is available as an open-source on Github under an Apache 2.0 license. The Swift Sandbox can be used within a browser and found at the IBM Swift Sandbox page.


Filed under: Developers, Enterprise Tagged: Apple, Bluemix, IBM, iOS, Kitura, Open source, Swift, Swift Package Catalog, Swift Sandbox, Swift@IBM

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Greg Barbosa

February 22nd

Apple

Mac

Happy Hour Podcast 044 | Mailbox’s demise + why open source Swift matters

Happy Hour 21

This week we’ll get into the finale of our iPad Pro saga, talk about Dropbox’s decision to kill Mailbox, and why Apple has open-sourced Swift. The Happy Hour podcast is available for download on iTunes and through our dedicated RSS feed. Thanks to Audible.com, get your free 30 day trial at audible.com/happyhour.

New episodes of Happy Hour are available every Wednesday. As mentioned, you can download this podcast via iTunes or plug in our RSS feed link into your favorite podcasting app. Send an email to listenermail@9to5mac.com (or click here) and your question/comment may be featured in an upcoming episode of Happy Hour.

Note: iTunes (web interface and app) may still be propagating the new episode which could take up to 24 hours. Subscribing to the podcast feed will guarantee the latest episode is downloaded.

Hosts:

Here’s what we discussed in this episode:

If you missed our 43rd episode last week, you can subscribe and find every episode or start off from the previous episode here. This episode was recorded on Monday, so expect our conversation about all the news from Tuesday (Apple Watch 2 event/iPhone 6s Smart Battery Case/Apple TV Remote fix!) next week.

Remember: Subscribe on iTunes to catch all of the episodes as they go live and send in your questions/comments to listenermail@9to5mac.com.


Filed under: Happy Hour Tagged: Apple, Happy Hour, iPad Pro, Mailbox, Open source, Podcast, Swift

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Dom Esposito

December 9th

Apple

Mac

Apple releases OS X 10.11 El Capitan Open Source Darwin code

MacBook OS X El Capitan

As it’s done with past releases, Apple today released the open source code of OS X 10.11 El Capitan. The release comes after Apple made good on its promise to open source its Swift programming language last week.

Apple updated its Open Source webpage last night, where it also provides downloads to open source code for current and past releases of its developer tools, iOS, and OS X Server, with downloads of the OS X 10.11 source code for developers interested in taking a look.

Apple’s open source release of OS X (aka Darwin) has been around since 2000 and usually arrives in the weeks following the public release of OS X. 

Darwin is an open sourceUnix-like computer operating system released by Apple Inc. in 2000. It is composed of code developed by Apple, as well as code derived from NeXTSTEP,BSD, and other free software projects.

Darwin forms the core set of components upon which OS X and iOS are based. It is mostlyPOSIX compatible, but has never, by itself, been certified as being compatible with any version of POSIX. (OS X, since Leopard, has been certified as compatible with the Single UNIX Specification version 3 (SUSv3).

The open source code comes as the latest release of OS X, 10.11.2, hit the Mac App Store earlier today. Read more about Apple’s history of open sourcing here.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Open source, OS X

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Jordan Kahn

December 8th

Apple

Mac

Apple retracts comment that it was first major open source company after criticism

apple-open-source-statement-2

Last week Apple’s open sourcing of Swift naturally saw the spotlight thrown over Apple’s open source pages. This included a paragraph that claimed Apple was “the first major computer company to make Open Source a key part of its strategy”. Unsurprisingly, this riled some members of the developer community as being disingenuous and untrue.

So Apple has since changed the text to retract the rather outlandish statement with something a bit more muted. Although this statement is technically qualitative and open to many interpretations, Apple isn’t exactly known for its open source contributions. The page now reads as follows:

‘Open source software is at the heart of Apple platforms and developer tools, and Apple continues to contribute and release significant quantities of open source code’.

The claim has been posted on Apple’s site for some time, but received fresh attention last week following the Swift release.

Whether Apple was right or wrong in what is said is actually hard to ascertain. It is true that Apple has maintained open source releases of UNIX all the way back to OS X 10.0 and now manages a host of open source projects including Bonjour, ResearchKit and perhaps most famously WebKit. However, Apple is not the best open source citizen in any of these cases. Apple is slow to release source code in many instances and often holds back code for a big ‘dump’ once the software has shipped, often weeks or months later. Case in point: Apple has not yet released the open-source elements for OS X 10.11 which was released in September.

These kind of ‘code bombs’ are frowned upon as being bad practice for open source, which is part of the reason people rejected Apple’s ‘open source first’ messaging so strongly. Open source advocates want public codebases to be more community oriented, with daily commits being published as the project progresses.

This is exactly how Swift is governed; WebKit is now on this path too although it wasn’t initially. Nowadays, LLVM, WebKit and (looking ahead) Swift mean that Apple is spearheading open source development in a big way. The written claim mentioned Apple’s historic approach to open source however, where the record is not as concrete.

Regardless of subject matter, claims about being the ‘first’ of anything are going to be controversial without sufficient evidence. The open source scene is so widespread and distributed that Apple’s best option was to change the phrasing, even if they believed it to be true themselves, to quell the criticism.


Filed under: AAPL Company, Developers, iOS, iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: Apple Open Source, Open source, Swift

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Benjamin Mayo

December 7th

Apple

Mac

Apple’s Swift programming language is now open source

Swift 16-9

As promised earlier in the year, Apple’s Swift team has now posted source code for the Swift compiler and standard library functions and objects. Open-sourcing Swift is a big win for the developer community as it means Swift can now be setup to run on a server and many other use cases, bringing Apple programming talent and expertise beyond ‘just’ making apps iOS devices and Macs.

Making Swift open-source also gives the developer community as a whole more confidence in the language. Theoretically, if Apple ever decided to move away from Swift (which is unlikely), the language could be picked up by others and continue development and existing codebases could continue to be supported.

Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 15.22.42

By open sourcing the language, Apple is also inviting the community to help make Swift better, by contributing to the language itself. It is yet to be seen how open Apple approach accepting significant community pull-request however. The Swift site says the project prefers ‘small incremental improvements’.

For those interested in finding out more, check out the documentation on the Swift.org site. The code itself is hosted on a GitHub repository. The repo is currently 404ing but the code should be up shortly.

Apple is publishing code for the raw language compiler as well as the Swift standard library and parts of Foundation, which many developers did not think would happen. Frameworks like AppKit and UIKit remain exclusive to Mac and iOS app development as expected. The published ‘core libraries’ include some of the most important components from AppKit and UIKit, like a networking stack, threading, and common data types, however. Apple says these features are actually planned for official release in the as-yet-unannounced Swift 3, but is including them now for feedback in the early development stages.

 


Filed under: Developers, iOS, iOS Devices, Tech Industry Tagged: developers, Open source, Swift

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Benjamin Mayo

December 3rd

Apple

Mac

WordPress gets a Mac app alongside completely rebuilt, open-source WordPress.com

wordpress-macbook

Today online publishing platform WordPress, which powers approximately 25% of websites on the Internet (this site included), is getting a major redesign with a completely rebuilt wordpress.com and the introduction of a new Mac app. We’ve been getting a taste of the improvements incrementally over the last year, but today is the company’s official launch.

I’ve been using the app for a few days leading up to the launch and, for what it is, I quite enjoyed the experience, which essentially mirrors what you get from the new wordpress.com. My enthusiasm, however, is keeping in mind that the app essentially feels like the web app in a wrapper, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing once you see how the wordpress.com web app experience has improved with the revamp.

animation-128-noditherBoth the new wordpress.com and Mac app can be used for publishing to sites hosted by WordPress, self-hosted blogs using the open-source WordPress platform, and WordPress VIP customers (like us).

The company gave us some background on the rebuilt wordpress.com and Mac app experience, which is also going open-source today with the launch, noting that the redesign “shifts WordPress.com from being primarily PHP-driven to primarily JavaScript- and API-driven”:

These products were all powered by a project internally codenamed Calypso, and Automattic is now releasing the code open source on GitHub under the GPL v2 license. More than 140 people worked for the past 18 months on Calypso, which shifts WordPress.com from being primarily PHP-driven to primarily JavaScript- and API-driven.

WordPress has more on specifics of the behind-the-scenes changes for developers and open-source contributors on its website here.

And here’s a closer look at the Mac app in action:

Sample Sample Sample Sample

You get a similar publishing experience to what you’d get on the web through wordpress.com, which is overall a vastly improved experience if you’re coming from using the latest release of WordPress on your self-hosted blog. The interface itself is a cleaner version of what WordPress has been slowly rolling out on the web in recent months, with access to all of WordPress’s main publishing and sharing features, a Reader mode for distraction free viewing, site stats, notifications, and settings. WordPress notes that users can use the Jetpack plugin to sync their site with the Mac app.

And while I was hoping to see more of a full-fledged Mac app than a mirror of the web app, it’s definitely the fastest and most streamlined WordPress experience so far. You’ll still get the benefit of using the app without a browser (although some features pull you out to a browser, for example, to view your website homepage or admin panel), and that means OS X features like full-screen app mode, system notification badges on the app’s icon in your dock, and navigating the app with OS X key commands, but that’s about it.

02-reader 03-reader-zoomed

But you might not find everything you’re used to exactly like it is on the latest release of WordPress you have installed. Some features aren’t accessible yet like configuring and managing plug-ins. You can download the WordPress for Mac app now (direct link).


Filed under: Apps, Mac Tagged: API, Automattic, calypso, GitHub, JavaScript, Mac App, Open source, PHP, WordPress, wordpress.com

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Jordan Kahn

November 23rd

Apple

Mac

Microsoft’s Android emulator coming soon to Mac as it open-sources Visual Studio Code

microsoft-visual-studio-Android-emulator-mac

During Microsoft’s Connect 2015 event today live from New York, the company announced it is open-sourcing its Visual Studio Code program for developers and in the process bringing its Visual Studio Emulator for Android to Mac users.

Microsoft first released the Visual Studio Emulator for Android for Windows users last year, but during its event today promised that Mac users will also soon gain access. The Visual Studio Emulator for Android is a tool within the full Visual Studio 2015 suite, which Microsoft brought to Mac users for the first time back in April. It offers Android devs an easy and free way to test and debug apps.

Microsoft has a sign-up form on its website that will notify Mac users when more info on the upcoming release becomes available. You can tune into Microsoft’s Connect 2015 event live hereThe company is also announcing Visual Studio Dev Essentials, a program giving devs access to everything they need for building and delaying apps for free, and updates to Visual Studio cloud subscriptions. 

And the new open-source version of Visual Studio Code is on GitHub here.


Filed under: Apps, Developers, Mac Tagged: android emulator, coming soon, Connect 2015, GitHub, Mac, Microsoft, Open source, Visual Studio Code

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Jordan Kahn

November 18th

Apple

Mac
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