Tags NAND

3D NAND Chips Are Going to Make High-Capacity SSDs a Reality [Guts]

SSDs are wonderful things that massively speed up your computer and they're getting cheaper too. But currently they don't offer the capacity that some users demand. Fortunately, that could all be about to change. More »


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Jamie Condliffe

June 28th

Uncategorized

Toshiba Storage Products’ THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology

Toshiba Storage Products' THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology32 nanometer process technology feels so... 2009. These days, Toshiba Storage Products is pushing something quite a bit smaller, as the outfit's new THNSNF solid state drives are said to be the world's first to take advantage of 19nm process NAND flash memory. 2012 just so happens to mark the 25th anniversary of Tosh's meddling in NAND, and the new series will be carrying the torch into even more bantam devices. Slates, Ultrabooks and perhaps a phablet or two may end up sporting on of these drives, replete with MLC (multi-level cell) flash. We're told that a trio of sizes will ship: there's a 9.5mm height edition, a 7mm version and an mSATA variant, all of which operate with a SATA 6Gbps interface. Power utilization is pegged at less than 0.1W, and mass production is expected to begin in August; mum's the word on partner companies implementing these into new products, but we're guessing the holiday season will be full of 'em.

Continue reading Toshiba Storage Products' THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology

Toshiba Storage Products' THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 05 Jun 2012 03:49:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

June 5th

Uncategorized

Toshiba Storage Products’ THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology

Toshiba Storage Products' THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology32 nanometer process technology feels so... 2009. These days, Toshiba Storage Products is pushing something quite a bit smaller, as the outfit's new THNSNF solid state drives are said to be the world's first to take advantage of 19nm process NAND flash memory. 2012 just so happens to mark the 25th anniversary of Tosh's meddling in NAND, and the new series will be carrying the torch into even more bantam devices. Slates, Ultrabooks and perhaps a phablet or two may end up sporting on of these drives, replete with MLC (multi-level cell) flash. We're told that a trio of sizes will ship: there's a 9.5mm height edition, a 7mm version and an mSATA variant, all of which operate with a SATA 6Gbps interface. Power utilization is pegged at less than 0.1W, and mass production is expected to begin in August; mum's the word on partner companies implementing these into new products, but we're guessing the holiday season will be full of 'em.

Continue reading Toshiba Storage Products' THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology

Toshiba Storage Products' THNSNF SSDs tap into 19nm process technology originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 05 Jun 2012 03:49:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

June 5th

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US government rules three Barth patents invalid, sends Rambus scrambling

Suing's easy. It's the "winning" that trips folks up. Such is the case with Rambus, who has been relying oh-so-heavily on the so-called trio of Barth patents to actively pursue just about every technology company on the planet. For those unaware, Rambus has christened itself as a "technology licensing company," but with the last of three patents used to win infringement suits against NVIDIA and HP being declared invalid, it's probably scrambling for new tactics. According to a Reuters report, an appeals board at the US Patent and Trademark Office declared the patent invalid a few days back, with the previous two being knocked back in September. A couple of months back, Rambus' stock lost 60 percent of its value after a court decision led to the loss of a $4 billion antitrust lawsuit against Micron and Hynix, and we're guessing things won't be any happier when the markets open back up on Monday. The company's next move? "We're evaluating our options," said spokeswoman Linda Ashmore.

US government rules three Barth patents invalid, sends Rambus scrambling originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 Jan 2012 07:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

January 30th

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Fusion-io breaks one billion IOPS barrier, pauses to congratulate itself

Let's get a little perspective, shall we? Corsair's Force Series 3 SSD -- a wholly awesome product in its own right -- is capable of hitting around 85,000 IOPS. On a good day. Fusion-io has been pushing the NAND storage envelope for years now, but even its recently-unveiled ioDrives deliver between 700,000 and 900,000 IOPS. Today, however, the company's pausing to pat itself squarely on the back -- and rightfully so. It managed to achieve one billion input and output operations per second in a technology demonstration conducted at DEMO Enterprise: An Evening of Innovation.

We're told that it was during a preview of the company's latency reducing Auto Commit Memory (ACM) extension, part of the Fusion ioMemory subsystem, and that it's "rethinking how to provide powerful modern CPUs with the data they need through sophisticated software architectures." The demo utilized eight HP ProLiant DL370 servers, each equipped with eight ioDrive2 Duos, to break the one billion IOP barrier when transferring 64 byte data packets. 'Course, that'd probably cost you a few dozen years of work if you were to buy such a setup yourself, but hey -- at least someone's working to eliminate the mechanical drive sooner rather than later, right?

Continue reading Fusion-io breaks one billion IOPS barrier, pauses to congratulate itself

Fusion-io breaks one billion IOPS barrier, pauses to congratulate itself originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 06 Jan 2012 20:35:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

January 7th

Uncategorized

Hynix, Micron turn to Taiwan following Apple’s Anobit buy

News broke earlier this week that Apple has acquired Israel-based fabless flash memory firm Anobit for as much as $400 million according to TheMarker, adding another leading chip maker to the company’s portfolio. Anobit’s NAND flash memory is already used in Apple products including the iPhone and iPad, and the firm’s technology is said to offer several advantages over that of its rivals. As DigiTimes pointed out in a recent report, the move also means Anobit’s other clients are now forced to look elsewhere as Apple becomes the exclusive owner of Anobit’s chip technology. Major players including Hynix and Micron were Anobit partners in the past, taking advantage of the company’s proprietary technology that improves the performance and lifespan of its flash memory products. Hynix, Micron and others are now reportedly looking to Taiwan-based companies including Phison Electronics and Silicon Motion Technology following the acquisition. Direct gains from Apple’s Anobit buy include the company’s technology and talent, but another advantage over rivals now emerges as a clear secondary benefit — smartphone vendors that used NAND flash memory chips made by soon-to-be former Anobit clients will no longer be able to utilize Anobit’s class-leading technology.

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Zach Epstein

December 23rd

Apple

Apple buys flash storage maker Anobit for $500 million, aims to establish R&D lab in Israel

The rumor mill has been churning on this one for the last few days, but it's now as official as it's ever apt to get: Apple has decided to splash out the $500 million to buy Israeli flash-chip outfit Anobit. The fabless designer of MLC NAND flash chips should be a good fit, given Cupertino's reliance on solid state storage technology for its iPad, iPod, iPhone and Macbook Air lines. With $84 billion in the bank, the purchase has cost the company just over half a percent of its war chest, and we're guessing it'll just barely feel the pinch when said funds are transferred over. The story was originally reported in the Calcalist financial daily newspaper, with the verified Twitter account of the Prime Minister of Israel chiming in with the following:
"Welcome to Israel, Apple Inc. on your [first] acquisition here. I'm certain that you'll benefit from the fruit of the Israeli knowledge."
Moreover, Apple's expected to open up a research and development center in the nation, marking its first outside of the USA. If history has anything to say about it, we highly doubt Apple will ever open its mouth one way or the other on this, but it'll be interesting to see what related nuggets are uncovered in the company's next quarterly filing with the SEC.

Apple buys flash storage maker Anobit for $500 million, aims to establish R&D lab in Israel originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 20 Dec 2011 20:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

December 21st

Apple

Apple Spending Tons of Cash on Israeli Super Memory [Guts]

Israeli financial paper Calcalist reports Apple has thrown down some serious stacks to acquire Anobit, a flash memory firm. But the purported $400-500 million (!) buyout isn't just for any memory firm—Anobit says its memory's faster and cheaper. More »


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Sam Biddle

December 20th

Apple

Tech mainstays finally come together on something: littering more HD content with more DRM

Who says the big boys can't be friends? While Samsung, SanDisk, Sony, Toshiba and Panasonic would probably disagree with each other on just about everything, there are still three magical letters that can bring even the biggest rivals together: DRM. While the consortium is doing everything it can to avoid the term, there's no hiding the truth -- the temporarily-named 'Next Generation Secure Memory Initiative' is designed to protect HD content by using "unique ID (identification) technology for flash memory and robust copy protection based on public key infrastructure." Just when we thought Louis C.K. had proven that slapping DRM around something wasn't the best approach, here we go taking a few monumental steps in the wrong direction.

In essence, it sounds as if they're crafting a way to distribute Blu-ray-quality material on SD cards and embedded memory (sound familiar?), and they're also hoping that this will "enable various HD content applications such as HD network download, broadcast content to-go and HD Digital Copy / Managed Copy from Blu-ray Disc." Notably, we're told that Android-based smartphones, tablets, TVs and Blu-ray products in particular can look forward to taking advantage -- in other words, Apple's going to keep doing what Apple does. If all goes well, they'll start licensing the new secure memory technology early next year, and if we had to guess, we'd say the adoption trajectory perfectly matches that of slotRadio. Good luck, folks -- you're going to need it.

Continue reading Tech mainstays finally come together on something: littering more HD content with more DRM

Tech mainstays finally come together on something: littering more HD content with more DRM originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 19 Dec 2011 11:53:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

December 19th

Uncategorized

128Gb NAND Chips Promise SD Cards with Terabytes of Storage [Memory]

Cell phones have taken another step towards becoming full-fledged pocket computers with an announcement by Micron and Intel. Get ready to carry even more of your digital life on your phone. More »


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Andrew Tarantola

December 7th

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