Tags Micron Technology

Expect faster MacBooks with longer battery-life thanks to DDR4 RAM

speed

Matt Margolis is predicting that Apple will be switching from DDR3 to DDR4 RAM for future MacBooks this year, suggesting faster performance and improved battery-life.

One of Apple’s RAM manufacturer. Micron, says that DDR3 bandwidth tops out at around 17GB/s, while DDR4 aims to double this by 2015:

Since the introduction of the iPhone, the industry has responded with an evolutionary transition from 2.6 GB/s LPDDR1, to 8.5 GB/s LPDDR2, to 17 GB/s LPDDR3, the technology currently is powering today’s high-end devices in volume production. DRAM bandwidth has roughly doubled with each generation to keep pace with demand.

The next generation of low-power DRAM (LPDRAM)—also known as LPDDR4—addresses these constraints by doubling the bandwidth of LPDDR3 while maintaining power neutrality. For example, LPDDR4 targets 34 GB/s of total bandwidth for a x64 memory subsystem, doubling the bandwidth target from LPDDR3

The company has not given specific targets for improved battery-life, but says that it aims to reduce power consumption in both active and standby modes.

Margolis suggests that DDR4 RAM may also make it into future iPhones and iPads.

Filed under: iOS Devices, Mac Tagged: Apple, DDR3, DDR4, Dynamic random-access memory, iPad, iPhone, iPhone 6, MacBook, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Micron, Micron Technology, Random-access memory

Check out 9to5Mac for more breaking coverage of iOS Devices, Apple, and iPhone.

What do you think? Discuss "Expect faster MacBooks with longer battery-life thanks to DDR4 RAM" with our community.

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Photo

Ben Lovejoy

April 3rd

Apple

Mac

Expect faster MacBooks with longer battery-life thanks to DDR4 RAM

speed

Matt Margolis is predicting that Apple will be switching from DDR3 to DDR4 RAM for future MacBooks this year, suggesting faster performance and improved battery-life.

One of Apple’s RAM manufacturer. Micron, says that DDR3 bandwidth tops out at around 17GB/s, while DDR4 aims to double this by 2015:

Since the introduction of the iPhone, the industry has responded with an evolutionary transition from 2.6 GB/s LPDDR1, to 8.5 GB/s LPDDR2, to 17 GB/s LPDDR3, the technology currently is powering today’s high-end devices in volume production. DRAM bandwidth has roughly doubled with each generation to keep pace with demand.

The next generation of low-power DRAM (LPDRAM)—also known as LPDDR4—addresses these constraints by doubling the bandwidth of LPDDR3 while maintaining power neutrality. For example, LPDDR4 targets 34 GB/s of total bandwidth for a x64 memory subsystem, doubling the bandwidth target from LPDDR3

The company has not given specific targets for improved battery-life, but says that it aims to reduce power consumption in both active and standby modes.

Margolis suggests that DDR4 RAM may also make it into future iPhones and iPads.

Filed under: iOS Devices, Mac Tagged: Apple, DDR3, DDR4, Dynamic random-access memory, iPad, iPhone, iPhone 6, MacBook, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Micron, Micron Technology, Random-access memory

Check out 9to5Mac for more breaking coverage of iOS Devices, Apple, and iPhone.

What do you think? Discuss "Expect faster MacBooks with longer battery-life thanks to DDR4 RAM" with our community.

Comments Off on Expect faster MacBooks with longer battery-life thanks to DDR4 RAM

Photo

Ben Lovejoy

April 3rd

Apple

Mac

Samsung loses $10B market value due to Apple order rumor

Samsung’s shares dipped more than 6 percent yesterday, erasing $10 billion from the manufacturer’s market value, due to a rumor that claimed Apple ordered large amounts of chips with rebounding Japanese chipmaker Elpida.

According to Reuters, Taiwan tech website DigiTimes reported that the Cupertino, Calif.-based Company requested huge orders for dynamic random access memory chips with Elpida’s Hiroshima, Japan plant. Unnamed industry sources said the order fastened about 50 percent of the factory’s total chip production.

Samsung is the world’s foremost DRAM manufacturer, but its shares subsequently fell 6.2-percent to around $1,100 USD after the piping hot rumor circulated the blogosphere. The abrupt plunge is the stock’s 9-week low and sharpest daily fall in almost four years. SK Hynix is the second-largest memory chipmaker after Samsung, and its shares closed down 9 percent, which is a 20-week low and steepest slump in nine months.

Two things to note here:

1. Digitimes is about 20% right at best on its calls so their reporting is hardly a done deal

2. Anyone who follows Apple knows that a). they never only have one supplier – they choose multiple suppliers and b). they are shrewd negotiators and probably bought the RAM for just above cost which won’t yield much profit for Elipida.

Read the full story at 9to5Google.



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Photo

Elyse Betters

May 16th

Apple

PoP Video turns your iPhone into a $99 pico projector

Not quite ready for the awesome Epson Megaplex iOS projector? Available for preorder right now, the PoP Video project from Micron Technology is a $99 pico projector with built-in 30-pin dock connector for your iPhone or iPod. The device works with iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, and third-generation and fourth-generation iPod touch, while providing two hours of playback at 960 x 540 pixel resolution. It comes with the following specs:

Size and Weight

(refer to the scale drawings of the PoP Video to the right)

Input and Output

  • Input: 30-pin dock connector
  • Video Output: qHD (960 x 540 pixel resolution)

Power and Battery

  • Battery: Built-in Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
  • Playtime: Up to two hours with full battery charge
  • Charging: Micro-USB charging (1.2 compliant)
  • Charge time: Fast charge in about 4 hours

Package Contents

  • PoP Video
  • User manual
  • USB charging cable


Comments Off on PoP Video turns your iPhone into a $99 pico projector

Photo

Jordan Kahn

May 2nd

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