Tags LaptopBag

Zero Trace gadget bags dodge ‘digital exploitation,’ schadenfreude

zero trace faraday bagFaraday bags? Oh, yeah. For the sleuthing shyster in your life, Escape the Wolf has a new range of gadget cases that are engineered with one primary purpose: to avoid technical surveillance, mobile phone tracking and remote digital exploitation. As it turns out, these guys have been lurking undercover for just over a month now, but it looks as if they're now on sale to the masses -- civilians included. The Zero Traces line can hold both laptops and phones alike, with each piece capable of shielding GSM / CDMA, WiFi and Bluetooth devices from being "remotely exploited." The pain? Between $24.99 and $199.99, and you can part ways with varying levels of cash right there in the source link.

Zero Trace gadget bags dodge 'digital exploitation,' schadenfreude originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 18 Apr 2012 01:52:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

April 18th

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Ona Camps Bay DSLR / laptop backpack review

Look, when it comes to hunting down a pack for your gadget collection, you've got options. Plenty of options. But not too many options like this. Ona -- a high-end purveyor of handcrafted camera bags -- first caught our eye last year with the markedly functional Union Street, but at the time, we felt that there was an even bigger gap in this universe that could only be filled with a like-minded backpack. So, here it is. The Camps Bay is the outfit's first full-on, back-worn pack designed to carry both a laptop (up to 17-inches, no less), a DSLR and a plethora of lenses and accessories.
In fact, this here bag holds a downright astonishing amount of kit, while looking decidedly unlike every other backpack that you've ever laid eyes on. For quite some time, Kata's brilliantly constructed 3N1-33 (review) was our go-to multi-mode bag; it's largely a perfect combination of laptop sack and camera organizer. But we always found ourselves hung up on a couple of issues. For one, it wasn't capable of swallowing 17-inch multimedia rigs. Secondly, shoving a full-frame body in there (Nikon's D3S comes to mind) isn't exactly easy when you're also toting a 24-70mm f/2.8 and 70-200mm f/2.8 -- two (huge) hunks of glass that any self-respecting pro almost certainly has access to. Read on for more of our thoughts.

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Ona Camps Bay DSLR / laptop backpack review originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 04 Nov 2011 13:45:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Darren Murph

November 4th

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