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Jony Ive reflects on a decade of Bono’s Product RED campaign to combat HIV/AIDS

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Apple turns its store logo red every year for World AIDS Day

Bono’s Product RED campaign to fight against HIV/AIDS in Africa has partnered with Apple for so long that you could easily mistake it as an Apple-created initiative, and this year the effort turns 10 years old with more than $350 million raised according to the Financial Times. In marking the decade-long effort to raise awareness and eliminate the virus/disease, FT highlighted Apple’s roots in the campaign:

The late Steve Jobs was involved with Red, designing and selling a Red-branded iPod. Apple has maintained its connection since Jobs’ death in 2011. Two years ago, Sir Jonathan Ive, Apple’s chief design officer, and his colleague Marc Newson, ran an auction of specially designed products, including a Leica Digital Rangefinder camera the pair customised, which sold for $1.8m. The auction raised $13m for Red, matched by The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Apple’s design chief Jony Ive shared his take in the piece on how Product RED has had a humanitarian reach, challenging the idea of any corporate effect.

Does Sir Jonathan think Red affected how companies think of corporate social responsibility? He demurs. “I’m much more interested in how a mother feels whose daughter is still alive than whether Red has had an impact on other companies.”

He adds: “The thing that first struck me was that the magnitude and ugliness of the problem would normally be cause for people to turn away. I loved the way Bono saw it as a problem to be solved.”

You can read the full piece on a decade of Bono’s Product RED campaign here.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: AIDS, Bono, HIV, Jony Ive, Product Red, red

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Zac Hall

January 20th

Apple

Mac

Video: Apple’s secret design studio revealed in ’60 Minutes’ segment

Apple Design Studio Revealed

On 60 Minutes yesterday, viewers were granted unprecedented access to Apple's hyper-secret design studio. Managed by Jony Ive, Apple's design studio is where a team of 22 handpicked designers collaborate and bring popular Apple products to life.

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Yoni Heisler

December 21st

Apple

60 Minutes goes inside Apple’s weekly exec meeting, design studio, spaceship campus, & more

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As expected, this weekend’s episode of 60 Minutes on CBS was chockfull of Apple news and anecdotes. Retail chief Angela Ahrendts, design head Jony Ive, CEO Tim Cook, and many more all joined host Charlie Rose to discuss a wide range of topics, including encryption, terrorism, design, retail, and much more…

First off, Cook again talked about how users shouldn’t have to choose between privacy and national security. “I think that’s an overly simplistic view,” Cook explained. “We’re America. We should have both.” Building on that, Cook reiterated the fact that there shouldn’t be a backdoor for anybody into consumer devices. This is a stance Cook has taken many times in the past, despite the recent issues of terror around the world.

Cook explained that iOS devices nowadays hold so much personal information, including health data, financial data, intimate conversations, and much more. It takes a special key to access that data, Cook said. And that’s a key to which even Apple doesn’t have access.

“If there’s a way to get in, somebody will find the way in. There have been people who suggest that we should have a back door. But the reality is if you put a back door in, that back door’s for everybody, for good guys and bad guys.”

Moving on, Cook and Rose discussed Apple’s use of Chinese labor and some of the issues that go along with it. Cook said that Apple’s use of foreign labor has nothing to do with wages, but rather with the skills that those workers possess and many American workers lack. This, Cook explained, is due to China putting an enormous focus on manufacturing, while the U.S. moved away from a focus on vocational skills:

“China put an enormous focus on manufacturing. The U.S., over time, began to stop having as many vocational kind of skills. I mean, you can take every tool and die maker in the United States and probably put them in a room that we’re currently sitting in. In China, you would have to have multiple football fields.”

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One issue that has surrounded Apple is the conditions in which workers operate in China. When asked if Apple has a responsibility to pay attention to conditions overseas, Cook said it does have a responsibility and it does it.

“We have a responsibility and we do it. We are constantly auditing our supply chain. Making sure that safety standards are, are, you know, are the highest. We’re making sure that working conditions are the highest. All of the things that you would expect us to look for and more, we’re doing it.”

Rose then asked Cook about recent allegations that Apple has moved away from the drive to perfect products that it had under late-CEO Steve Jobs. Cook said, however, that Apple is still very much Steve’s company. “This is still Steve’s company,” Cook said. “It was born that way, it’s still that way. I’ve never met anyone on the face of the earth [like Jobs],” Cook remarked. “He had this incredible and uncanny ability to see around the corner. Who had this relentless driving force for perfection.”

Cook and Rose also talked about what exactly it takes to get a job at Apple. Cook explained to Rose that it takes a lot more than just a skill to work in Cupertino. Rather, people at Apple have to have an uncanny drive at wanting to change the world and have to be idealists who dream big and can know what kind of technology is the future.

You look for people who work for a different reason. People who want to change the world and work with a passion and an idealism. People that don’t take no for an answer. People that don’t accept the status quo. People that inherently aren’t satisfied with things. People who see things and know it should be different and sit and focus on it until they find an answer. People that can’t be told things are impossible.

When asked how Apple looks for people like that, Cook was quick to note that the company doesn’t test, but rather looks people, again, with a drive and a passion:

We don’t test. We don’t put someone through one interview. We have like 10 or 12 people who interview. We look at candidates through different points of views and we have a very diverse population. We’re looking for wicked smart and people that have a point of view and can debate that point of view.

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Also this week, Charlie rose got a demonstration of iPhone camera technology from Apple’s senior director of camera hardware Graham Townsend. Townsend showed how Apple simulates every possible lighting situation in its labs to ensure that the iPhone is capable of handling anything a user throws at it.

Rose also got a look at the weekly, mandatory executive meeting held at Apple’s headquarters every Monday. Attendance, Rose explained, is mandatory.

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Next, Rose got a tour of Jony Ive’s uber secret design studio. Rose first noticed that nearly all of the tables in the studio were covered up with blankets, which Ive said is due to the fact that if Rose could have seen what was there, he would have seen a “glimpse of the future.”

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Ive then showed Rose the 10 different variants that Apple considered for the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus. Ive explained that the reason Apple chose the design it did was because of an “emotional” connection Ive and his team felt to the design.

Rose was then taken to an unmarked building off of its main campus. The building, unknown to Rose, turned out to be a mockup Apple Retail Store. Rose then talked to retail chief Angela Ahrendts, who said that she holds meetings in that mockup store every week to discuss potential changes to retail design and more.

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Rose also sat down with Phil Schiller to talk about the idea that one Apple product could cannibalize another. “It’s by design. You need for each to fight for their space. The iPhone has to be so great you don’t know why you want an iPad,” Schiller explained. “The iPad has to be so great you don’t know why you want a notebook. The notebook has to be so great you don’t know why you want a desktop. Each one’s job is to compete with the other ones.”

Rose and Cook then discussed Apple Watch and some of the allegations that it’s not as refined as it should be. “Every product can be improved,” Cook explained. “And the Watch is no exception to that. I’m not disappointed in it. When we launch a product, we’re already working on the next one. And sometimes even the next next one. We always see things we can do to improve,” Cook said.

Finally, Cook was asked about the potential of Apple developing a car and as he has done in the past, he avoided the question. “One of the great things about Apple is that we probably have more secrecy here than the CIA,” the Apple executive joked.

Ive, when asked about the idea of Apple becoming “too rich” said that it’s certainly a possibility.

“That possibility absolutely exists. I think one of the things that also has the possibility to exist is that our heads are down on these tables worrying about these designs and our heads don’t tend to be up looking around us. We’re more aware of us and the perfection we’re chasing.”

Cook and Rose also dove into the personal details of Cook’s life, including his decision to come out as gay. Cook explained that while he is a very private person, he did it to help those who struggle with that aspect of their lives.

“I value my privacy. I’m a very private person. But it became increasingly clear to me that if I said something, that it could help other people. And I’m glad because I think that some kid somewhere, some kid in Alabama, I think if they just for a moment stop and say, “If it didn’t limit him, it may not limit me.” Or this kid that’s getting bullied or worse, I’ve gotten notes from people contemplating suicide. And so if I could touch just one of those, it’s worth it. And I couldn’t look myself in the mirror without doing it.”

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A full transcript of Rose’s interviews with Phil Schiller, Angela Ahrendts, Tim Cook, Jony Ive, Graham Townsend, and Eddy Cue can be read here. Earlier this week, 60 Minutes shared a clip of Cook talking to Rose about Apple’s tax policies. Those comments, including Cook calling claims that Apple avoids taxes “total political crap,” can be read here.

 


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: 60 Minutes, Angela Ahrendts, Apple, interview, Jony Ive, Phil Schiller, Tim Cook

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Chance Miller

December 21st

Apple

Mac

Apple’s secret design studio and new ‘Apple store of the future’ to be featured on ’60 Minutes’

Apple Design Studio

Of all the secretive enclaves within Apple, none is more hallowed than Apple's notoriously quarantined design studio. Run by Jony Ive, Apple's design studio is where the company's small team of industrial designers collaborate, experiment, and bring products to life. Every Apple product you've ever used over the last 15+ years -- from the flower iMac to the iPhone 6s -- can be traced back to this studio.

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Yoni Heisler

December 18th

Apple

Caption contest: What is Jony Ive explaining to Charlie Rose?

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When CBS shared a photo of Charlie Rose touring Apple’s secretive design studio to promote an upcoming 60 Minutes piece, we got to wondering what it was Jony Ive was explaining to Rose.

How thick the iPhone 7 will be now Apple has decided to include all the various features people have asked for? What the first prototype of the battery hump looked like? How much thicker his wallet got after his promotion?

Post your entries in the comments or on Twitter or Facebook, and the best one will win an Aukey Bluetooth Speaker and a 20000mAh USB battery pack. Keep it clean, please …

We’ll update the post with the winner on Sunday before the show airs. Good luck!


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: 60 Minutes, Apple Inc, Caption contest, Charlie Rose, Design studio, Jony Ive

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Ben Lovejoy

December 18th

Apple

Mac

Charlie Rose to tour Jony Ive’s ‘secret design studio’ and new Store design for CBS on Sunday

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Jony Ive will give a rare look into Apple’s secret design studio in Cupertino this coming Sunday, December 20th. Ive will lead Charlie Rose through the secret design study for his popular show 60 Minutes on CBS. In addition to a tour of the design lab, Rose will also get a “first look at Apple’s store of the future” from retail chief Angela Ahrendts.

The news was revealed in a pair of tweets from the 60 Minutes Twitter account tonight, both of which included a teaser image. In one image, Ive can be seen showing Rose a portion of his secret design lab in Cupertino. In the other, Ahrendts can be seen leading Rose into an unidentified Apple Store.

This isn’t the first time Charlie Rose has landed an interview with notable Apple executives. In 2013, Rose sat down with Jony Ive and Marc Newson to discuss Apple’s partnership with RED, as well as other details about the design process at Apple. Last year, Tim Cook joined Charlie Rose to discuss Steve Jobs, Beats, Apple TV, and much more.

60 Minutes with Jony Ive and Angela Ahrendts airs this Sunday, December 20th, at 7:30PM ET & 7PM PT on CBS in the United States. The teaser tweets can be seen below:


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: 60 Minutes, Angela Ahrendts, Charlie, interview, Jony Ive

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Chance Miller

December 18th

Apple

Mac

Jony Ive talks Apple Pencil, calls other tools ‘poor representation of the analog world’

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Alongside iPad Pro, Apple revealed a new tool to accompany the device, the Apple Pencil. While Apple Pencil has been hard to come by in terms of availability, those who have managed to get their hands on one have seemingly been impressed with the $99 Jony Ive-deisgned accessory. Now Ive, Apple’s Chief Design Officer, has sat down with Wallpaper Magazine and The Telegraph to discuss his inspiration to make Apple Pencil…

One big thing Ive made sure to note during his interview with Wallpaper Magazine was that the Apple Pencil is not meant to replace the finger as the main input device of the iPad Pro. Apple Pencil is meant to accompany the finger as an input device used when a user is “exclusively making marks.”

I think there’s a potential to confuse the role of the Pencil with the role of your finger in iOS, and I actually think it’s very clear the Pencil is for making marks, and the finger is a fundamental point of interface for everything within the operating system. And those are two very different activities with two very different goals. The traditional pencil could have been replaced by a dish of powdered charcoal, which you dipped your finger into to make marks with. And that didn’t happen.

Regarding the name of Apple Pencil, Ive explained how me felt the word pencil better exemplified Apple’s goal than “stylus” or “pen” did. Ive noted of how everyone associates the word “stylus” with technology, whereas they associate pencil with the very simple and analogue idea of tasks like painting and drawing.

I like the name Pencil much more than stylus because stylus seems a product that’s about technology. Pencil, to me, seems very analogue in its association. But what is challenging is that it will become many things. There’s an incredible painting app and very powerful drawing apps. For some people it will be a graphic instrument and to others it will be a fountain pen. One of the technologies within the Pencil means that as well as detecting pressure, we are also detecting the angle of the pencil.

Ive’s comments on the use cases and name of Apple Pencil really explemify how the company doesn’t believe it went against Steve Jobs’ early saying of never needing a stylus to use an iOS device when he introduced the original iPhone in 2007.  Apple really believes that its Pencil tool is far more than just a stylus.

Ive also was sure to point out that while the design of Apple Pencil is simple, there’s a lot going on inside the device to give it the ability to do what it can do. One thing Ive said he was proud of was the device’s charging capability. Often mocked, Apple Pencil can be charged by simply being plugged into the Lightning port of the iPad Pro:

And one thing that I was excited about is the ease of charging. If you are in the middle of drawing something, you can easily just plug it into the iPad Pro and it recharges extremely fast. Just that alone, having the very fast recharge, was an important attribute so that you could work with confidence and not feel that you would have to manage a number of battery lives. I think you relax knowing whatever happens, you can very quickly recharge it.

This comment specifically shows how Ive really believes that Apple knows what the consumer wants more than the consumer knows what he or she wants. Charging the Apple Pencil by plugging it in to iPad Pro was slammed when the device was originally announced, but Ive still stands by the notion that it’s the best way to charge the accessory.

Speaking to The Telegraph, Ive explained of how Apple Pencil has led many on his design team to start using iPad to sketch. Ive told of how his team has almost exclusively used paper and pencil to sketch in the past, but the combination of iPad Pro and Apple Pencil is leading some to change their habits. This, Ive said, is due in large part to every other stylus being a “pretty poor representation of the analogue world.”

“Many of us in the design team have worked together for 20 plus years. We’ve always drawn in our sketchbooks, and for the first time – despite flirting with some alternatives a couple of years ago – I’m seeing people starting to use the iPad and Apple Pencil. Our personal experience has been that there are definitely affordances and opportunities now that you have a much more natural and intuitive environment to make marks, there are clearly things you can do sketching and writing on the iPad which you could never dream of doing in the analogue world.”

To get the most out of Apple Pencil and iPad Pro, Ive encourages users to just “start drawing.” The Apple executive believes that until you start using something with a sense of carelessness, you won’t get the most out of it. You have to stop thinking about what you’re doing and just draw.

“I always like when you start to use something with a little less reverence. You start to use it a little carelessly, and with a little less thought, because then, I think, you’re using it very naturally. What I’ve enjoyed is when I’m just thinking, holding the Pencil as I would my pen with a sketchpad and I just start drawing.

When you start to realise you’re doing that without great intent and you’re just using it for the tool that it is, you realise that you’ve crossed over from demoing it and you’re actually starting to use it. As you cross that line, that’s when it actually feels the most powerful.”

Ive’s comments on Apple Pencil show just how much Apple is buying into the idea that iPad Pro truly is the best device for the creative professional. Ive makes it clear that Apple worked hard to perfect the features of Apple Pencil, like palm rejection, pressure sensing, and angle sensing.

Of course, Apple Pencil is still very hard to find. The accessory is listed as shipping 4-5 weeks after you purchase, with Apple Stores only getting random shipments of it. In the meantime, check out Zac’s hands-on with Apple Pencil here, as we was lucky enough to win the Pencil lottery.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: Apple Pencil, interview, iPad Pro, Jony Ive

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Chance Miller

November 18th

Apple

Mac

Apple’s own design team always used paper, now starting to use the iPad Pro & Apple Pencil, says Jony Ive

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Apple’s design chief Jony Ive told the Telegraph that while his own team has worked using paper sketchbooks for more than 20 years, they are for the first time starting to use the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil instead.

Many of us in the design team have worked together for 20 plus years. We’ve always drawn in our sketchbooks, and for the first time – despite flirting with some alternatives a couple of years ago – I’m seeing people starting to use the iPad and Apple Pencil. Our personal experience has been that there are definitely affordances and opportunities now that you have a much more natural and intuitive environment to make marks, there are clearly things you can do sketching and writing on the iPad which you could never dream of doing in the analogue world.

He said that while he’d started off demonstrating it, he’d then found himself using it for his work … 

What I’ve enjoyed is when I’m just thinking, holding the Pencil as I would my pen with a sketchpad and I just start drawing.

When you start to realise you’re doing that without great intent and you’re just using it for the tool that it is, you realise that you’ve crossed over from demoing it and you’re actually starting to use it.

Ive told the Telegraph that ensuring that the Pencil felt like a traditional writing instrument had been both important, and a challenge.

We hoped if you are used to spending a lot of time using paintbrushes, pencils and pens, this will feel like a more natural extension of that experience – that it will feel familiar. To achieve that degree of very simple, natural behaviour, was a significant technological challenge […]

Every other stylus you’ve used is a pretty poor representation of the analogue world.

Tim Cook said earlier this week that the Apple Pencil, a $99 optional accessory that works only with the iPad Pro, was more than just a stylus.

Don’t expect to be able to get one today, though, even if you’re lucky enough to get your iPad Pro: most stores are saying that stock has not yet arrived.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple Inc, Apple Pencil, iPad Pro, Jonathan Ive, Jony Ive

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Ben Lovejoy

November 11th

Apple

Mac

Jony Ive explains motivation behind Apple’s decision to sponsor the 2016 Met Gala

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It was revealed last week that Apple would be sponsoring the 2016 Met Gala, with Chief Design Officer Jony Ive serving as a co-chair for the event. Now, Ive, along with Vogue editor Anna Wintour, another Gala co-chair, and Costume Institute Curator Andrew Bolton, has sat down with The Wall Street Journal for an interview on Apple’s foray into the fashion industry.

Ive himself explained that Apple’s interest in the fashion industry has peaked recently thanks to the release of Apple Watch. Ive also teased that learning more about fashion, especially from other attendees of the Met Gala, will help Apple in defining potential future projects.

“As products become more personal, something that is worn on the wrist put us in the space of fashion,” Ive said. On the relationhip between fashion and tech, the theme of this year’s Met Gala, Ive said that it’s an issue that’s close to his heart. “These are issues close to our hearts,” the Apple executive remarked.. “Our understanding will temper and define future products we’re working on. We’re only starting.”

At Apple, Ive said there’s still very much a mix of antiquated and modern technology being used. Ive said that he still draws with a pencil and paper every day, but uses modern technology to enhance it.

The 2016 Met Gala, “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology,” all take place in New York on May 2nd.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Apple watch, Fashion, Jony Ive, met Gala

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Chance Miller

October 20th

Apple

Mac

Jony Ive explains motivation behind Apple’s decision to sponsor the 2016 Met Gala

Screen Shot 2015-10-20 at 5.54.00 PM

It was revealed last week that Apple would be sponsoring the 2016 Met Gala, with Chief Design Officer Jony Ive serving as a co-chair for the event. Now, Ive, along with Vogue editor Anna Wintour, another Gala co-chair, and Costume Institute Curator Andrew Bolton, has sat down with The Wall Street Journal for an interview on Apple’s foray into the fashion industry.

Ive himself explained that Apple’s interest in the fashion industry has peaked recently thanks to the release of Apple Watch. Ive also teased that learning more about fashion, especially from other attendees of the Met Gala, will help Apple in defining potential future projects.

“As products become more personal, something that is worn on the wrist put us in the space of fashion,” Ive said. On the relationhip between fashion and tech, the theme of this year’s Met Gala, Ive said that it’s an issue that’s close to his heart. “These are issues close to our hearts,” the Apple executive remarked.. “Our understanding will temper and define future products we’re working on. We’re only starting.”

At Apple, Ive said there’s still very much a mix of antiquated and modern technology being used. Ive said that he still draws with a pencil and paper every day, but uses modern technology to enhance it.

The 2016 Met Gala, “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology,” all take place in New York on May 2nd.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Apple, Apple watch, Fashion, Jony Ive, met Gala

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Chance Miller

October 20th

Apple

Mac
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