Tags iPod

On painful Apple rumors

macbook pro Several photos have surfaced showing what is supposed to be the next iPhone and MacBook Pro over the last few days. These leaked photos themselves are not surprising. Apple spy photos are big business and a staple in tech journalism. But if these photos are to be believed, radical changes are about to hit two of Apple’s flagship products. And it’s about damn time. The iPhone shots… Read More

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Matt Burns

June 1st

Gadgets

Forget baseball cards, old iPods are selling for thousands of dollars on eBay

Old iPods
The market for old electronics products is a bit bizarre. While a brand new iMac might set you back about $1,200, trying to get your hands on an original Apple I might set you back as much as $365,000. Much like the market for cars, the most expensive consumer electronics products tend to be either brand new or dreadfully old. Undoubtedly, many people are willing to shell out top dollar in the interest of nostalgia. While original Apple I computers are nearly impossible to come by, you can still make a pretty penny if you happen to have a drawer somewhere filled with old iPods. Since Apple first entered the music player business nearly 15 years ago, the company has churned out about 25 different iPod models. And if you happen to have a few old iPods lying around, you might want to see if they're worth anything.

(more…)

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Yoni Heisler

May 13th

Apple

Check the back of your drawers – your old iPod could be worth big bucks to a collector

The discontinuation of the iPod Classic back in 2014 gave prices of used models a boost in the following holiday season, some models selling for up to four times the original price. A Guardian report says that collectors are now paying even more for some models, with special editions selling for as much as $90,000.

Terapeak, a company which tracks pricing of collectibles on eBay, […] found that classic iPods in their original packaging were priced at collectibles levels – one U2 special edition, Terapeak noted, sold in November for $90,000.

more…


Filed under: Tech Industry Tagged: Apple collectibles, iPod, IPod Classic, iPod Classic values, iPod Classic worth, iPod collectibles

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Ben Lovejoy

May 12th

Apple

Mac

Review: Tt eSports Contour Made-for-iPhone/iPad/Apple TV game controller

It’s been a while since we’ve checked in on the state of iPhone and iPad controllers, but I have seen some improvements since we first covered some of the shortcomings with the early batch of game controllers that came out under Apple’s Made-for-iPhone licensing program. Today I’m taking a look at the new Tt eSports Contour MFi controller, a new $65 option that includes a classic Xbox-style design and a built-in stand to hold your iPhone and turn it into a true handheld game console.

more…


Filed under: Reviews Tagged: Apple TV, controller, Game controller, iPad, iPod, made for iPhone, MFi, review, Tt eSports Contour

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Jordan Kahn

March 4th

Apple

Mac

Review: Tt eSports Contour Made-for-iPhone/iPad/Apple TV game controller

It’s been a while since we’ve checked in on the state of iPhone and iPad controllers, but I have seen some improvements since we first covered some of the shortcomings with the early batch of game controllers that came out under Apple’s Made-for-iPhone licensing program. Today I’m taking a look at the new Tt eSports Contour MFi controller, a new $65 option that includes a classic Xbox-style design and a built-in stand to hold your iPhone and turn it into a true handheld game console.

more…


Filed under: Reviews Tagged: Apple TV, controller, Game controller, iPad, iPod, made for iPhone, MFi, review, Tt eSports Contour

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Photo

Jordan Kahn

March 4th

Apple

Mac

Review: Tt eSports Contour Made-for-iPhone/iPad/Apple TV game controller

It’s been a while since we’ve checked in on the state of iPhone and iPad controllers, but I have seen some improvements since we first covered some of the shortcomings with the early batch of game controllers that came out under Apple’s Made-for-iPhone licensing program. Today I’m taking a look at the new Tt eSports Contour MFi controller, a new $65 option that includes a classic Xbox-style design and a built-in stand to hold your iPhone and turn it into a true handheld game console.

more…


Filed under: Reviews Tagged: Apple TV, controller, Game controller, iPad, iPod, made for iPhone, MFi, review, Tt eSports Contour

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Photo

Jordan Kahn

March 4th

Apple

Mac

Opinion: Apple had a good year for product launches in 2015, despite unrealistic expectations from some

apple-store-brussels-2

The view that Apple lost its innovative edge with the sad loss of Steve Jobs has been one of the oft-repeated criticisms of the company in recent years. But this idea is based on an entirely mythological view of Apple as a company that was constantly launching ground-breaking new product categories.

The reality is a little more mundane. The Macintosh, a truly revolutionary computer, was launched in 1984. We had to wait 17 years for the next groundbreaking product: the iPod in 2001. We had to wait six years after that for the next major product category: the iPhone in 2007. And a further three years for the iPad in 2010. (If you wanted to push things a little, you could argue that the MacBook Air was also so revolutionary that it deserves to be included; if so, we’re up to five new product categories in 26 years.)

Note, too, that none of the product categories were invented by Apple. Xerox, of course, invented the graphical user interface for personal computers. There were MP3 players before the iPod; touchscreen smartphones before the iPhone; tablets before the iPad. What Apple did in each case was what the company does best: take something clunky and used only by techies, and turn it into a slick product that will appeal to the masses.

So no, Apple never has churned out revolutionary new products on an annual basis. If we’re going to assess its performance today, it has to be against a realistic background. Zac recently reminded us of Apple’s product timeline for 2015. Looking at this in the context of a company whose true history is occasionally taking a new product category and doing it better than anyone else – and in between times merely refining its existing product ranges – how did Apple do this year … ?

Firstly, of course, there was the Apple Watch. Ok, Apple announced the product in 2014, but it went on sale this year, so I’d argue it counts as a new product category in 2015. As with the Macintosh, iPod, iPhone and iPad, Apple looked at an existing invention – the smartwatch – and figured out how to do it better. Much better.

It was so successful in this that even I – a techie who normally needs little excuse to buy a new gadget, but couldn’t see the point in smartwatches – was assimilated. When we asked you to name the Apple Product of the Year, the Apple Watch was the clear winner, taking more than twice as many votes as the second-placed iPhone 6s/Plus.

Granted not all of you were sold – a recent poll showed that some 16% of owners had abandoned the device, and a further 13% are not wearing it daily – but there’s no question that the Watch is a successful product. Admittedly, Apple has declined to reveal sales numbers – stating only that sales are strong and growing – and analysts have had to make wild guesses, but it’s abundantly clear that Apple has sold more smartwatches than every other manufacturer put together. Way, way more.

ipad-pro

One could debate the status of the iPad Pro – new product category, or just a ginormous iPad? I can see arguments on both sides. While technically it is just a larger iPad, you could equally well have argued that the iPad itself was just a larger iPod touch. Sometimes size matters.

Although I concluded that the iPad Pro wasn’t for me, I did not in any way dismiss the device. As I said at the time, it’s a great device for many people. Brilliant for artists and designers (you easily chose the Apple Pencil as Apple Peripheral of the Year). A great tool for corporate warriors. Very handy for musicians. A better choice than a laptop for those with relatively basic computing needs. And a fantastic personal entertainment machine.

Importantly, the iPad Pro – together with all those enterprise apps – is clearly going to take the enterprise market by storm.

So, new category or not, the iPad Pro will, I’m sure, prove to be a hugely valuable product for Apple, and one which could very well help the company turn around those flagging iPad sales.

Oh, and the new iPad mini brought it into line with the design and capabilities of the iPad Air 2. Not unexpected, of course, but still a worthwhile upgrade.

macbook

The 12-inch MacBook doesn’t qualify as a new product category – it’s just the latest refinement of the MacBook Air concept – but again, as product evolutions go, it’s an impressive one.

It hasn’t yet sold itself to me personally. I’m still very happy with my 11-inch MacBook Air, and appreciate the fact that this can drive my 27-inch display to provide a full desktop experience when needed.

But it takes the MacBook Air concept to the next level. Its power will of course increase, and I’m confident that support for external monitors will come. Once it’s a little more capable, I have no doubt that this is the machine that is set to replace the MacBook Air.

Admittedly, we didn’t see anything else exciting on the MacBook side. The Retina MacBook Pro got Force Touchand a refreshed MacBook Air just got a Broadwell CPU and faster graphics. We’re going to have to wait until next year for more significant enhancements there.

imac

On the desktop side, there were the new 4K and 5K Retina iMacs. Sure, evolution rather than revolution, but it was clear from the reviews that the 5K iMac was blowing people away. At a time when almost everyone else has given up on desktops, Apple is still there launching new products that continue to wow people.

Apple also didn’t forget desk-based customers when it came to peripherals, launching the Magic Keyboard, Magic Trackpad 2 and Magic Mouse 2. Again, nothing amazing (despite the names), but still keeping things fresh.

tv

The Apple TV 4 got a more mixed reception. Many viewed it as effectively giving non-gamers a games console in their living-room for the first time, and one which will at least keep the kids amused. Siri was also welcomed by most. Others complained that it was inexplicable that a TV box launched in 2015 omitted 4K.

6s

Finally, we have a to give a more than honorable mention to the iPhone 6s. 3D Touch expanded the capabilities of the user-interface, and the camera functionality got a big boost with Live Photos, 5MP FaceTime camera, 4K recording and 1080p slo-mo at 120fps – even if the boost from 8MP to 12MP was something of a mixed blessing.

LTE Advanced will also be appreciated once it is more widely supported. For an S-year, it’s an impressive release.

apple

Apple cannot, of course, please all of the people all of the time. I still grumble about the disappearance of the 17-inch MacBook Pro, and still cling to the hope that the 12-inch MacBook could lead to new even-numbered sizes that at least sees a 16-inch MacBook Pro in my future.

And we’re all techies, so we’re of course always impatient for new toys. But viewed in a sensible historical context, I think we have to say that 2015 was an impressive year for Apple. Do you agree? Take our poll, and please share your reasons in the comments.

With the end of that year almost upon us, it only remains to say that I’ve had enormous fun writing these opinion pieces throughout the year, and have been very appreciative of the responses. I’ve very much enjoyed reading your comments, and look forward to doing so in 2016. Happy new year!


Filed under: AAPL Company, Opinion Tagged: 2015, 2015 review, Apple Inc, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Mac, Macintosh, Opinion, Steve Jobs

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Ben Lovejoy

December 31st

Apple

Mac

Review: Nomad’s Pod Pro, PowerPlant, Roadtrip + Wallet wrap iPhone/iPad batteries in luxury materials

nomad2015

Nomad is ending 2015 with a bang. Having moved from small plastic accessories into using luxury materials including metal, leather, and wood, Nomad is flexing its design muscles with four new Apple device chargers that are equally attractive and creative. There’s a deluxe metal Apple Watch/iPhone travel charger called Pod Pro, the wood-encased iPad battery pack PowerPlant, a hybrid iPhone battery and car charger named Roadtrip, and a Lightning battery-equipped leather Wallet. Three of the accessories look as if they were expressly designed to be holiday gifts, while the fourth is less exotic, but practical.

The common thread here is “portable power.” Pod Pro steps up from Nomad’s Apple Watch-only Pod (reviewed here) by more than tripling the power to 6,000mAh, and adding iPhone charging. PowerPlant packs an iPad-ready 12,000mAh cell inside a solid American Walnut wood block. Roadtrip serves as a car charger in your car, doubling as a portable iPhone battery pack for on-the-go use. And Wallet guarantees you’ll have a 2,400mAh battery and Lightning cable anywhere you go. Below, I’ll quickly walk through all of these new accessories so you can get a sense of whether any or all of them is right for you, or your favorite gift recipient…

Key Details:

  • Pod Pro can recharge any iPhone at least once, Apple Watch twice
  • PowerPlant can recharge the iPad Air 2 once, beautiful design
  • RoadTrip can recharge an iPhone 6s Plus 75%, small iPhones 100%
  • Wallet recharges iPhone 5 series to 100%, 6 series over 50%.

podpro-2

Pod Pro

Out of all four of these accessories, the one that initially interested me the most was Pod Pro, Nomad’s bigger and better sequel to the early Apple Watch charging dock Pod. Featuring a clean circular design that resembles Apple’s just-released plastic Apple Watch Magnetic Charging Dock, both Pod models wrap a self-supplied Magnetic Charging Cable around a circular battery core. While Pod has an 1,800mAh battery that can recharge an Apple Watch around 3 times, Pod Pro’s 6,000mAh battery — and integrated Lightning cable — can be used either to keep your Apple Watch running for 9 days, or to refuel both your iPhone and Apple Watch on the road. It charges the iPhone at 1 Amp and the Apple Watch at 500mA.

podpro-3 podpro-4 podpro-5

In my testing, Pod Pro was able to deliver a 134% recharge to a power-hungry iPhone 6s Plus, as well as a 100% recharge to a 42mm Apple Watch — both notably Apple’s largest devices of their kinds. Nomad suggests that Pod Pro can recharge both an Apple Watch and an iPhone twice, and that’s true if you’re using a smaller iPhone and/or Apple Watch. You’ll come closer to a 2x charge with an iPhone 6 or 6s, and do even better with any iPhone 5-series phone. A small four-light indicator on the base is triggered with an adjacent button to let you know how much energy is remaining, and a micro-USB cable can be used to refuel Pod Pro’s battery.

podpro-1

Like Pod, Pod Pro looks and feels great. The gunmetal cap is solid, magnetically attaching to the plastic cable-wrapping and battery core, which has a large anti-slip rubber pad on the bottom. To hold the bigger battery, it’s larger — a 3.9″ diameter versus Pod’s 3.1″ — but the added size of the still puck-like shape doesn’t radically change its Apple Watch compatibility. You can place open-band Watches on its top, and either loop closed-band Watches (like the Milanese, shown above) around its bottom if you’re willing to risk scuffing. Tighter bands (including the Link Bracelet) may not fit that way.

podpro-6

The alternative is to follow the example set by Apple’s new dock, and pop the inductive charger puck out of Pod Pro’s top hole. To do this, you just need to feed your charging cable’s USB plug through Pod Pro’s gunmetal cap. I wouldn’t for a moment call this ideal, but it works if you’re using a closed band.

podpro-1

While Pod Pro isn’t cheap, it delivers much better value for the dollar than Apple’s Magnetic Charging Dock, as the materials, integrated battery, and Lightning charging option make it worth actually carrying around as a travel recharger for your Apple Watch and iPhone. Due to its capacity, I would personally pick it over the original Pod even if I was just looking to keep an Apple Watch running on the road, but go with the version that suits your budget and needs.

Manufacturer:
Nomad
Price:
$100
Compatibility:
Apple Watch, All Lightning iPhones, iPads, iPods

powerplant-2

PowerPlant

Of all four accessories here, I have the least to say about PowerPlant, which is the simplest concept — albeit with the best name. Measuring roughly 5.9″ by 2.9″ by 0.6″, it’s a genuine wood box made from American Walnut, a design you’d be hard-pressed to find in other Apple device batteries. Decidedly rectangular but smooth, it houses a 12,000mAh battery with a 2.1A micro-USB input, twin 2.1A USB outputs, and a button to trigger a four-LED light panel on the top. The color of the box is a rich, attractive brown, accented by black and gunmetal plastics, with silver ink on the bottom for specifications and branding. A micro-USB cable is included to refuel the battery, which given the high capacity requires an overnight charging session.

powerplant-1 powerplant-3 powerplant-4

During my testing, PowerPlant was able to deliver a 103% recharge to an iPad Air 2, which is 13% lower than the similarly 12,000mAh myCharge HubUltra I tested earlier this year. While that isn’t bad given that HubUltra sells for 10% more, it’s fair to say that 12,000mAh batteries are becoming much more common and affordable. The Aukey PB-N28 I reviewed is now selling for under $20, though it’s seriously low on frills; you’ll have to compromise on everything from power indicator lights to charging and recharging performance to use it. PowerPlant has the same capacity, but a much nicer presentation at a premium price. Speaking for myself, I’d sooner go with a metal-clad, more powerful, and less expensive option such as Anker’s PowerCore+ 20100, but if you love wood enough to wrap your external iPad battery in it, PowerPlant is a reasonable option.

Manufacturer:
Nomad
Price:
$100
Compatibility:
All USB iPhones, iPods, iPads, Apple Watches

roadtrip-1

Roadtrip

Like batteries, there are hundreds of car chargers out there, and very little innovation to distinguish them from one another. Built with an anodized aluminum face and soft touch rubber body, Roadtrip breaks from the pack in several ways. First, it’s the very rare car charger with both USB and USB-C ports; you supply the charging cable of your choice. Second, both ports can be used simultaneously, and though the packaging and web site differ on this point, Roadtrip delivers 3.0-Amps of total power, with 1.5A out per port. Third and finally, there’s actually a 3,000mAh battery inside, so when you’re done driving somewhere, you can pull it out of your car’s power outlet and carry it around for power. In my testing, the battery delivered a 75% recharge to my large iPhone 6s Plus; smaller iPhones will get a full recharge.

roadtrip-3 roadtrip-4 roadtrip-2

Depending on how much you drive — and how much you alternate between driving and walking — Roadtrip could either be extremely convenient or somewhat confounding. It strikes me as more practical than the only other dual-purpose car charger I can recall, Incase’s Car/Wall Charger, which awkwardly grafted wall blades onto a car charger years ago. If you drive to work — or drive then transfer to a train or subway to get to work — you can have a battery that’s ready to use anywhere throughout the day, then recharged by plugging it back into your car before you drive home.

The only question is whether you drive enough for your car’s power outlet to fully recharge Roadtrip between uses; Nomad notes that “it’s almost always 100% full and ready to use,” which will be accurate if it has two hours of collective time to recharge in your car, without an iPhone attached. When your iPhone’s attached, it will recharge the iPhone first, then itself, extending the spare battery’s charging time. Roadtrip is therefore best suited to commuters with long travel times, and other people who — as the name suggests — have long road trips ahead. It’s not for everyone, but those who need it will appreciate what it offers in a single, reasonably-priced enclosure.

Manufacturer:
Nomad
Price:
$60
Compatibility:
iPhones, USB iPods

wallet-1

Wallet

Last but certainly not least is Nomad’s new Wallet, which is the most distinctive item in this collection — and the one that has the most potential to become a breakout hit. Made from black Saffiano leather, Wallet was “tirelessly prototyped” until it could fit a 2,400mAh battery into a design that’s “true to the size of a standard wallet.” In person, Wallet looks bigger than the deliberately compact and awesomely minimalist Flipside Wallet I carry, but it’s around 2/3 the size of my iPhone 6s Plus, and not much larger than the leather wallets I used to carry around.

wallet-2

Nomad made some pretty smart choices when designing Wallet. The cash compartment is large enough to hold bills of any currency, and six visible card slots are augmented by two hidden compartments for business cards or other items. By placing the battery and pop-out Lightning cable in Wallet’s spine, Nomad manages to make its charging solution basically undetectable in a front pocket; the core is also fortified with aluminum to preserve the battery’s integrity, which could be an issue for people who sit on their back-pocketed wallets.

During testing, the compromises I noted were in power controls and capacity. In the name of streamlining, Wallet offers no button to trigger the four white LED remaining power indicators, or turn power on and off; it starts working when you plug it into your iPhone, and stops when you unplug it or run out of power, providing no way to check the power level without interrupting charging. You use a separate included micro-USB cable to recharge it, which would ideally take place on your nightstand while you sleep — keeping your wallet connected to your computer’s USB port mid-day is quite an unusual sight.

wallet-4 wallet-5 wallet-3

While I found Wallet’s look and feel to be pretty nice, its battery is the smallest in this group. During my testing, the 2,400mAh capacity was just able to completely fill an iPhone 5c — basically identical to the iPhone 5 — before becoming unable to charge further. So while Nomad promises a “full charge for your iPhone 6s,” that’s probably optimistic. In a separate test refueling the slightly larger-capacity iPhone 6, Wallet fell well short of a 100% charge, and Apple’s Plus models obviously demand even more energy. From my perspective, Wallet is best understood as a highly compact way to carry around at least a partial backup charge for any iPhone on the go, and so long as you don’t expect a complete recharge from the latest models, you’ll be satisfied with its performance.

Manufacturer:
Nomad
Price:
$100
Compatibility:
Lightning iPhones, iPods

More From This Author

Check out more of my editorials, How-To guides and reviews for 9to5Mac here! In recent months, I published a holiday gift guide for Apple photographers, and a lot of different topics of interest to Mac, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Apple TV, and Apple Watch users.


Filed under: General, iOS Devices, Reviews Tagged: Apple watch, Batteries, chargers, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Nomad, Pod Pro, PowerPlant, Roadtrip, wallet

For more news on iOS Devices, iPhone, and iPad continue reading at 9to5Mac.

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Photo

Jeremy Horwitz

November 18th

Apple

Mac

Tony Fadell discussed what an Apple car would look like with Steve Jobs back in 2008

A group portrait of Apple CEO Steve Jobs, with some of his executives who designed the iPhone. From left: Philip Schiller, iPod Boss Tony Fadell, Design Chief Jonathan Ive, Apple CEO Steve Jobs, Scott Forstall, and Eddy Cue. Jobs announced the iPhone during a keynote presentation at the MacWorld conference in San Francisco. The iPhone is set to revolutionize mobile phone technology, combining the capabilities of a cell phone, an iPod, and an internet communications device with a revolutionary touch-screen design.

Tony Fadell, often called the “father of the iPod” and now CEO of Alphabet’s Nest, is on Bloomberg TV today to discuss his time at Apple, the future of mobility and his current effort in the connected home industry. During the interview, Fadell revealed that back in 2008, he had discussions with then Apple CEO Steve Jobs about what an ‘Apple car’ would look like and how the company could approach such a project…

At the time, Fadell says the company had little time and resources to allocate to the project, but the discussion is now more relevant than ever with the growing rumors about the Cupertino-based company developing an electric car through “Project Titan“.

When asked about talking to Steve Jobs about building a car, Fadell said:

“We had a couple walks – and this was in 2008 – about if we were to build a car, what would we build? […] We would be looking at what would a dashboard be, what would seat be, how would you fuel it or power it, but at the end it was always like “we are so busy, we are so constraint” – you know – it would be great to do it, but we can’t.”

The executive followed up saying that at the time, they preferred focusing all their efforts toward the cellphone business and that several other potential products were considered, but eventually dropped by the company.

When talking about Apple’s possible entry in the transport industry, Fadell was optimistic about what the company could do for the industry:

“If you think about a car – what’s a car? – a car has batteries, it has a computer, it has a motor and it has a mechanical structure. If you look at an iPhone, it has all the same things. It even has a motor in it (probably referring to the Taptic engine). If you try to scale it up “oh my god, I can make a car with those same components”. There is some truth to that.”

“Some truth” is one way to put it. Of course he is right about both products having parallels, but comparing the “mechanical structure” of the iPhone with a car is arguably a stretch.

Fadell then emphasized that the “hard stuffs” will be about connectivity and mobility as a service. Something he thinks Apple and Google would have an advantage in because these features rely heavily on software.

You can watch the whole video here:

Top image via Fortune


Filed under: Apple Car Tagged: Apple, Apple Car, Father of the iPod, iPod, Steve Jobs, Tony Fadell

For more news on Apple, Steve Jobs, and iPod continue reading at 9to5Mac.

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Photo

Fred Lambert

November 4th

Apple

Mac

Tony Fadell discussed what an Apple car would look like with Steve Jobs back in 2008

A group portrait of Apple CEO Steve Jobs, with some of his executives who designed the iPhone. From left: Philip Schiller, iPod Boss Tony Fadell, Design Chief Jonathan Ive, Apple CEO Steve Jobs, Scott Forstall, and Eddy Cue. Jobs announced the iPhone during a keynote presentation at the MacWorld conference in San Francisco. The iPhone is set to revolutionize mobile phone technology, combining the capabilities of a cell phone, an iPod, and an internet communications device with a revolutionary touch-screen design.

Tony Fadell, often called the “father of the iPod” and now CEO of Alphabet’s Nest, is on Bloomberg TV today to discuss his time at Apple, the future of mobility and his current effort in the connected home industry. During the interview, Fadell revealed that back in 2008, he had discussions with then Apple CEO Steve Jobs about what an ‘Apple car’ would look like and how the company could approach such a project…

At the time, Fadell says the company had little time and resources to allocate to the project, but the discussion is now more relevant than ever with the growing rumors about the Cupertino-based company developing an electric car through “Project Titan“.

When asked about talking to Steve Jobs about building a car, Fadell said:

“We had a couple walks – and this was in 2008 – about if we were to build a car, what would we build? […] We would be looking at what would a dashboard be, what would seat be, how would you fuel it or power it, but at the end it was always like “we are so busy, we are so constraint” – you know – it would be great to do it, but we can’t.”

The executive followed up saying that at the time, they preferred focusing all their efforts toward the cellphone business and that several other potential products were considered, but eventually dropped by the company.

When talking about Apple’s possible entry in the transport industry, Fadell was optimistic about what the company could do for the industry:

“If you think about a car – what’s a car? – a car has batteries, it has a computer, it has a motor and it has a mechanical structure. If you look at an iPhone, it has all the same things. It even has a motor in it (probably referring to the Taptic engine). If you try to scale it up “oh my god, I can make a car with those same components”. There is some truth to that.”

“Some truth” is one way to put it. Of course he is right about both products having parallels, but comparing the “mechanical structure” of the iPhone with a car is arguably a stretch.

Fadell then emphasized that the “hard stuffs” will be about connectivity and mobility as a service. Something he thinks Apple and Google would have an advantage in because these features rely heavily on software.

You can watch the whole video here:

Top image via Fortune


Filed under: Apple Car Tagged: Apple, Apple Car, Father of the iPod, iPod, Steve Jobs, Tony Fadell

For more news on Apple, Steve Jobs, and iPod continue reading at 9to5Mac.

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Photo

Fred Lambert

November 4th

Apple

Mac
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