Tags investigation

Apple could face penalty in Russia over same-sex couple emoji inclusion

Apple could potentially be facing a fine upwards of one million rubles in Russia (which is only about $15,000 USD) over its inclusion of same-sex couple emoji characters on the built-in iOS keyboard. The Independent reports that police in Russia have began an investigation into Apple to determine whether the company has violated a highly controversial national ban on activity its […]

Comments Off on Apple could face penalty in Russia over same-sex couple emoji inclusion

Photo

Zac Hall

September 27th

Apple

Mac

Apple again said to be under federal investigation over upcoming streaming music service

beats

Following a report yesterday claiming that Apple was being investigated by the Department of Justice over anti-competitive practices surrounding the launch of its rebranded Beats streaming music service, Bloomberg this evening now corroborates that report. Bloomberg says that the Federal Trade Commission is investigating whether Apple is using its large iTunes store to put rival streaming music services like Spotify at a disadvantage.

FTC officials have reportedly been in contact with at least one record label regarding Apple’s practices. Some of the concerns allegedly surround Apple’s negotiations with artists for exclusive rights to content. The FTC investigation is centered around the question of whether Apple’s efforts will change how music labels behave with other streaming music services. One example of this would be labels reducing the music available to ad-supported services in favor of Apple’s paid tiers.

Music industry executives, however, say that Apple has not placed any sort of demands on the labels, according to the report.

The FTC investigation, which is still in the early stages, is asking whether Apple’s efforts will change the way music labels work with other streaming services, for example curtailing ad-supported music and pushing more songs into paid tiers of service at higher rates, according to one of the people.

Apple hasn’t made such demands on the labels, according to the music-industry executives.

Earlier this year it was reported that Jimmy Iovine, who is working on Apple’s rebranded streaming music service, tried to lure key artists away from Jay Z’s Tidal streaming service. Apple, of course, is no stranger to federal investigation, with the company being found guilty of anti-competitive practices in a long-running ebook case last year, eventually settling the case for $450M.

Apple is expected to relaunch Beats Music at WWDC in June, despite contrary reports, and integrate it into a redesigned Music application. The company is reportedly aiming at a $7.99/month price point.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Beats, FTC, investigation, streaming service

Check out 9to5Mac for more breaking coverage of AAPL Company, Beats, and FTC.

What do you think? Discuss "Apple again said to be under federal investigation over upcoming streaming music service" with our community.

Comments Off on Apple again said to be under federal investigation over upcoming streaming music service

Photo

Chance Miller

May 6th

Apple

Mac

LA Unified School District brings ‘iPads for All’ program to a close as FBI opens investigation

iPad Air

Earlier this year the Los Angeles Unified School District announced that it would be suspending its “iPad for All” program after it ran into an array of problems. Things started off optimistically in July 2013 when the district announced that it would give 640,000 students iPads for school.

A few crafty students figured out a way to bypass the built-in restrictions on the devices, then the district realized that it may have miscalculated the cost of the entire program. Eventually officials started to question if iPads really were the right tablets to hand out after all.

Now the LAUSD has decided to scrap the entire plan for good just as the Federal Bureau of Investigation has started taking a closer look at the deal.

The LA Times reports that yesterday federal investigators seized about twenty boxes of documents from the school district. The investigators are probing connections between Apple executives, former LAUSD superintendent John Deasy, and Pearson, the company that created the customized curriculum for the iPads. Deasy oversaw the creation of the iPad program until he resigned in October.

Today, superintendent Ramon Cortines announced that the program was being shut down completely.

“We’re not going to use the original iPad contract anymore,” Cortines said Tuesday. “I think there have been too many innuendos, rumors, etc., and based on my reading of a great deal of material over Thanksgiving, I came to this conclusion.

“As CEO and steward of a billion-dollar operation, I have to make sure things are done properly so they are not questioned.”

Cortines claims the decision to shut down the program today is not related to yesterday’s visit from the FBI. Instead, he says it was simply an extension of the suspension that was put in place in August. It seems that even as recently as yesterday, the school district still planned to buy iPads it had no intention of using.

Interestingly, despite Apple’s recent focus on education and proclamations from Tim Cook on equal access to technology in education, rival Google’s Chromebook laptops have managed to take the top spot in that market in recent months, pushing the iPad down on the list. This most recent decision by the LAUSD certainly won’t help with that.


Filed under: AAPL Company Tagged: Education, FBI, investigation, ipads for all, John Deasy, Los Angeles Unified School District, ramon cortines

Visit 9to5Mac to find more special coverage of AAPL Company, Education, and investigation.

What do you think? Discuss "LA Unified School District brings ‘iPads for All’ program to a close as FBI opens investigation" with our community.

Comments Off on LA Unified School District brings ‘iPads for All’ program to a close as FBI opens investigation

Photo

Mike Beasley

December 3rd

Apple

Mac

Department of Justice employing ‘All Writs Act’ to compel Apple to bypass iPhone encryption

IMG_3726

As you’ve no doubt heard by now, the federal government is not a big fan of Apple’s decision to employ data protection measures on its iOS devices that prevent snooping on a customer’s private information, even taking its disapproval to ridiculous levels at times.

Today Ars Technica reports that federal authorities are now considering new ways to force Apple to bypass these protections to assist in criminal investigations.

The latest weapon in the Department of Justice’s war on privacy is the All Writs Act, which has enabled a federal court to order a company or individual to do just about anything to aid in a criminal investigation since 1789. That methodology is being employed in at least one case in California, where prosecutors want Apple’s help in getting to the data on a suspect’s iPhone.

The idea here is that a court can order Apple to employ “any capabilities it may have to unlock the phone,” according to court documents obtained by Ars. Stanford Law lecturer Johnathan Mayer added a bit more context to the story, noting that in the past, Google has agreed to comply with such orders, and Apple is almost certain to agree as well.

There are some limits on the All Writs Act, though. For example, it can only come into play if there isn’t a law that stops it from being employed (if mowing your lawn was illegal, a federal court couldn’t issue a writ forcing you to mow your lawn, for example). Use of the All Writs act must be justifiable as part of an investigation, and can only be used to compel those who are actually involved in the case.

So while the All Writs Act doesn’t provide the courts total authority, it can be used to compel Apple or other smartphone companies to decrypt data (to the best of their abilities) as part of a criminal investigation.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: all writs act, court, criminal, federal, Government, investigation

Continue reading more about iOS Devices, Government, and court at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Department of Justice employing ‘All Writs Act’ to compel Apple to bypass iPhone encryption" with our community.

Comments Off on Department of Justice employing ‘All Writs Act’ to compel Apple to bypass iPhone encryption

Photo

Mike Beasley

December 2nd

Apple

Mac

Didn’t get your order? UPS sorter charged with sneaking 60 iPhones/iPads out in his pants

Macbook-in-pantsMore than a few people in and around Springfield, Virginia have not been receiving their Apple orders over the last six months as wusa9 reports police have arrested a 31-year-old UPS sorter for stealing over 60 iPhones, iPads, and MacBooks:

Stephen A. Owens, a UPS sorter, was reportedly taking unopened Apple products, stuffing them into his pants or otherwise concealing them and then selling them at bargain prices, officials say.

“Thefts were reportedly taking place in batches since September 2012, and included such items as Macbooks, iPhones, iPods and iPads all being shipped directly from Apple to new customers. UPS became suspicious when customers started calling to inquire or complain that they had not received their products,” according to a news release from the Fairfax County Police Department.

Police say the 6-month investigation found the sorter was taking the Apple products directly from unopened packages at UPS and selling the devices at discounted prices online throughout D.C, Maryland and Northern Virginia.


Comments Off on Didn’t get your order? UPS sorter charged with sneaking 60 iPhones/iPads out in his pants

Photo

Jordan Kahn

June 5th

Apple

Mac

Apple’s to DOJ: Publishers already decided to fix prices before iBookstore came along

Image (1) iBookstore1.jpg for post 30622

In the ongoing e-book price fixing case with the Department of Justice, in which Apple is accused of conspiring with publishers to fix eBook pricing and cut out Amazon, Apple has again responded to the DOJ’s claims detailing the “tough negotiations” it went through with publishers. To further prove its point that it was not colluding with publishers to fix e-book pricing, Apple said it “one-on-one” and “contentious negotiations” at a time when publishers were already considering methods of getting Amazon to increase pricing:

But Apple said the publishers had decided, independent of Apple, to eliminate discounts on wholesale book prices of e-books, to sell lucrative hardcover books first to bookstores in a practice called windowing and to take other measures to push Amazon to raise prices.

Each publisher had different counterproposals, Apple said in a filing that described tough negotiations in detail. “Early — and constant — points of negotiation and contention were over Apple’s price caps and 30 percent commission. After Apple sent draft agency agreements to each publisher CEO on January 11, each immediately opposed Apple’s price tiers and caps,” Apple said in its 81-page proposed findings of fact.

Apple is now the only defendant in the case filed in April 2012 as the 4 other publishers originally accused in the lawsuit, including Pearson, Macmillan, Simon & Schuster, and HarperCollins, have already reached settlements and agreed to return to their old pricing scheme for a certain period of time. The trial is now slated for June 3rd with the DOJ seeking a ruling that “Apple violated antitrust law and an order blocking it from engaging in similar conduct.”

Previously, U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan granted a request from the Justice Departmenty that will force Apple CEO Tim Cook to give a four hour deposition related to the high profile ebook price-fixing lawsuit.


Comments Off on Apple’s to DOJ: Publishers already decided to fix prices before iBookstore came along

Photo

Jordan Kahn

May 15th

Apple

Mac

Apple’s to DOJ: Publishers already decided to fix prices before iBookstore came along

Image (1) iBookstore1.jpg for post 30622

In the ongoing e-book price fixing case with the Department of Justice, in which Apple is accused of conspiring with publishers to fix eBook pricing and cut out Amazon, Apple has again responded to the DOJ’s claims detailing the “tough negotiations” it went through with publishers. To further prove its point that it was not colluding with publishers to fix e-book pricing, Apple said it “one-on-one” and “contentious negotiations” at a time when publishers were already considering methods of getting Amazon to increase pricing:

But Apple said the publishers had decided, independent of Apple, to eliminate discounts on wholesale book prices of e-books, to sell lucrative hardcover books first to bookstores in a practice called windowing and to take other measures to push Amazon to raise prices.

Each publisher had different counterproposals, Apple said in a filing that described tough negotiations in detail. “Early — and constant — points of negotiation and contention were over Apple’s price caps and 30 percent commission. After Apple sent draft agency agreements to each publisher CEO on January 11, each immediately opposed Apple’s price tiers and caps,” Apple said in its 81-page proposed findings of fact.

Apple is now the only defendant in the case filed in April 2012 as the 4 other publishers originally accused in the lawsuit, including Pearson, Macmillan, Simon & Schuster, and HarperCollins, have already reached settlements and agreed to return to their old pricing scheme for a certain period of time. The trial is now slated for June 3rd with the DOJ seeking a ruling that “Apple violated antitrust law and an order blocking it from engaging in similar conduct.”

Previously, U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan granted a request from the Justice Departmenty that will force Apple CEO Tim Cook to give a four hour deposition related to the high profile ebook price-fixing lawsuit.


Comments Off on Apple’s to DOJ: Publishers already decided to fix prices before iBookstore came along

Photo

Jordan Kahn

May 15th

Apple

Mac

Apple under fire from governments in both hemispheres over alleged anti-competitive practices

Apple may be facing an anti-trust investigation in Europe over its iPhone contracts with carriers as it defends itself against separate investigations for alleged price-gouging in Australia.

Apple was informed last year that it would be required to attend a hearing by Australia’s Standing Committee on Infrastructure and Communications to explain why its pricing of digital content was higher in Australia than in the USA. The hearing is now underway, reports the Sydney Morning Herald, with Apple asked to explain why content sold through iTunes is marked up between 30 and 70 percent higher than in the USA. Apple is blaming wholesale pricing agreements in the country.

“The pricing of this digital content is based on the wholesale prices which are set through negotiated contracts with the record labels, movie studios and TV networks,” said Mr King, who is Apple’s vice president for Australia, New Zealand and South Asia.

“In Australia, they have often set a higher wholesale price than the price of similar content in the United States.” Mr King said in the digital age “the content industry still runs with perhaps old-fashioned notions of country borders or territories or markets” … He said the price of digital content sold on iTunes in Australia was “comparable to other Australian physical and online stores” and this indicated competitors were offered similar wholesale pricing.

The hearing is looking at Australian pricing across the IT sector, with Microsoft and Adobe also in the dock. Apple’s hardware pricing has also come under fire, though price premiums there have been found to be in the more modest 3-10% range once taxes and currency differences are accounted for.

Meantime, The New York Times reports that the European Union is considering whether Apple’s contracts with European phone carriers may contravene anti-trust regulations. Although no formal complaints have yet been filed, several French carriers have reportedly submitted details about their contracts with Apple, forcing them to commit to buying large volumes of iPhones if they wish to sell them at all. It is suggested that pressure to sell all of this stock results in them pushing iPhones to consumers who might otherwise have been offered competitor handsets.

Some of Apple’s competitors complain that the big purchases Apple requires from carriers strongly pressure them to devote most of their marketing budgets to the iPhone, leaving little money to promote competing devices, said an executive at one of Apple’s rivals, who declined to be named to avoid jeopardizing carrier relationships.

The EC competition commission said only that it was “monitoring the situation,” and the next step is likely to be informal discussions with carriers and with Apple before any formal proceedings are considered.


Comments Off on Apple under fire from governments in both hemispheres over alleged anti-competitive practices

Photo

Ben Lovejoy

March 22nd

Apple

Mac

Apple under fire from governments in both hemispheres over alleged anti-competitive practices

Apple may face an anti-trust investigation in Europe over its iPhone contracts with carriers as it defends itself against separate investigations for alleged price gouging in Australia.

Apple was informed last year that it would be required to attend a hearing by Australia’s Standing Committee on Infrastructure and Communications to explain why its pricing of digital content was higher in Australia than in the United States. The hearing is now underway, as reported by the Sydney Morning Herald, with Apple asked to explain why content sold through iTunes is marked up between 30 and 70 percent higher than in the U.S. Apple is blaming wholesale pricing agreements in the country.

“The pricing of this digital content is based on the wholesale prices which are set through negotiated contracts with the record labels, movie studios and TV networks,” said Mr King, who is Apple’s vice president for Australia, New Zealand and South Asia.

“In Australia, they have often set a higher wholesale price than the price of similar content in the United States.” Mr King said in the digital age “the content industry still runs with perhaps old-fashioned notions of country borders or territories or markets” … He said the price of digital content sold on iTunes in Australia was “comparable to other Australian physical and online stores” and this indicated competitors were offered similar wholesale pricing.

The hearing is looking at Australian pricing across the IT sector, with Microsoft and Adobe also in the dock. Apple’s hardware pricing has also come under fire, though price premiums there have been found to be in the more modest 3 to 10 percent range once taxes and currency differences are accounted for.

Meantime, The New York Times reported that the European Union is considering whether Apple’s contracts with European phone carriers may contravene anti-trust regulations. Several French carriers have reportedly submitted details about their contracts with Apple, although no formal complaints have yet been filed, forcing them to commit to buying large volumes of iPhones if they wish to sell them at all. It is suggested that pressure to sell all of this stock results in carriers pushing iPhones to consumers who might otherwise have been offered competitor handsets.

Some of Apple’s competitors complain that the big purchases Apple requires from carriers strongly pressure them to devote most of their marketing budgets to the iPhone, leaving little money to promote competing devices, said an executive at one of Apple’s rivals, who declined to be named to avoid jeopardizing carrier relationships.

The EC competition commission said only that it was “monitoring the situation,” and the next step is likely to be informal discussions with carriers and Apple before any formal proceedings are considered.


Comments Off on Apple under fire from governments in both hemispheres over alleged anti-competitive practices

Photo

Ben Lovejoy

March 22nd

Apple

Mac

How the FTC Screwed Up the Google Investigation (and Screwed You In the Process)

The FTC's reported closing of its Google search bias investigation, with no real enforceable settlement mechanism, and a special new self-enforcement antitrust precedent apparently only available to Google, raises serious questions about the integrity of the FTC's law enforcement process and whether the FTC accords Google with special treatment not available to other companies. More »


Comments Off on How the FTC Screwed Up the Google Investigation (and Screwed You In the Process)

Photo

Scott Cleland

January 3rd

Uncategorized
line
February 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29