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Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Arthur P Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Engadget learned that Arthur P. Stern passed away on May 24th, 2012, but just this week, The Los Angeles Times has published a laudable look back at a man that had an enormous impact on the technology that we rely on -- and, quite frankly, take for granted -- each and every day. Born in 1925 in Budapest, Hungary, Arthur went on to obtain an M.E.E. from Syracuse University, joining General Electric in 1951 and making a near-immediate impact in the realm of television. He's widely credited with pioneering the color TV that we're familiar with today (and holding a related patent -- number 2920132 -- granted in December of 1953), while also publishing initial technical papers on transistor radios. As if that weren't enough, he was also instrumental in the progress of GPS, spearheading the development of key elements in the latter portion of his career.

As fantastic as Stern was as an inventor, he was also a beloved grandfather to Joanna Stern, one of the industry's premiere technology reporters. Currently, Joanna works at ABC News, though she has spent time at LAPTOP Magazine, The Verge and right here at Engadget prior. From the entire staff, our deepest sympathies go out to a wonderful colleague and peer. The world has lost a brilliant mind, but on a personal level, a friend has lost much more.

Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 08 Jun 2012 19:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Joanna Stern (Twitter)  |  sourceLos Angeles Times, Joanna Stern (Tumblr)  | Email this | Comments

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Darren Murph

June 8th

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Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Arthur P Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Engadget learned that Arthur P. Stern passed away on May 24th, 2012, but just this week, The Los Angeles Times has published a laudable look back at a man that had an enormous impact on the technology that we rely on -- and, quite frankly, take for granted -- each and every day. Born in 1925 in Budapest, Hungary, Arthur went on to obtain an M.E.E. from Syracuse University, joining General Electric in 1951 and making a near-immediate impact in the realm of television. He's widely credited with pioneering the color TV that we're familiar with today (and holding a related patent -- number 2920132 -- granted in December of 1953), while also publishing initial technical papers on transistor radios. As if that weren't enough, he was also instrumental in the progress of GPS, spearheading the development of key elements in the latter portion of his career.

As fantastic as Stern was as an inventor, he was also a beloved grandfather to Joanna Stern, one of the industry's premiere technology reporters. Currently, Joanna works at ABC News, though she has spent time at LAPTOP Magazine, The Verge and right here at Engadget prior. From the entire staff, our deepest sympathies go out to a wonderful colleague and peer. The world has lost a brilliant mind, but on a personal level, a friend has lost much more.

Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 08 Jun 2012 19:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Joanna Stern (Twitter)  |  sourceLos Angeles Times, Joanna Stern (Tumblr)  | Email this | Comments

Comments Off on Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

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Darren Murph

June 8th

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Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Arthur P Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Engadget learned that Arthur P. Stern passed away on May 24th, 2012, but just this week, The Los Angeles Times has published a laudable look back at a man that had an enormous impact on the technology that we rely on -- and, quite frankly, take for granted -- each and every day. Born in 1925 in Budapest, Hungary, Arthur went on to obtain an M.E.E. from Syracuse University, joining General Electric in 1951 and making a near-immediate impact in the realm of television. He's widely credited with pioneering the color TV that we're familiar with today (and holding a related patent -- number 2920132 -- granted in December of 1953), while also publishing initial technical papers on transistor radios. As if that weren't enough, he was also instrumental in the progress of GPS, spearheading the development of key elements in the latter portion of his career.

As fantastic as Stern was as an inventor, he was also a beloved grandfather to Joanna Stern, one of the industry's premiere technology reporters. Currently, Joanna works at ABC News, though she has spent time at LAPTOP Magazine, The Verge and right here at Engadget prior. From the entire staff, our deepest sympathies go out to a wonderful colleague and peer. The world has lost a brilliant mind, but on a personal level, a friend has lost much more.

Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 08 Jun 2012 19:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Joanna Stern (Twitter)  |  sourceLos Angeles Times, Joanna Stern (Tumblr)  | Email this | Comments

Comments Off on Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

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Darren Murph

June 8th

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How One Man Took a Secret Super-Material to His Grave [Science]

In 1990, an amateur inventor called Maurice Ward appeared on British TV demonstrating a super-material he'd invented without any scientific training. Called Starlite, it could withstand temperatures of 1000 °C, was hard enough to drill holes in walls, and could easily be painted on to surfaces. In 2011 Ward sadly passed away—without ever having explained to a single scientist how it worked. More »


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Jamie Condliffe

May 16th

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Google Doodle celebrates Gideon Sundback, unzips knowledge about your favorite wearables

google zipper doodle

We've covered no shortage of wearable gizmos over the years here at Engadget -- in fact, we've given 'em their own category -- but we most certainly haven't spent enough time praising one of the pioneers of the segment. Thanks to a highly pleasing Google Doodle, we're given the perfect chance to take a harder look at one Gideon Sundback, the electrical engineer responsible for developing the zipper. It's been called a "fly," prominently featured in an Outkast song and positively shunned on the Snuggie, and it's also a huge, huge part of worldwide culture. For those looking to learn more about the man, the myth and the mystery, head on down to the Wikipedia link below; if you just want to unzip your browser, well... click here.

Google Doodle celebrates Gideon Sundback, unzips knowledge about your favorite wearables originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 24 Apr 2012 00:43:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGoogle, Gideon Sundback (Wikipedia)  | Email this | Comments

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Darren Murph

April 24th

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Ralph Baer, video game mastermind, sits down for inventor portrait video

Ralph Baer is a name synonymous with gaming lore, credited with the invention of the Magnavox Odyssey and thinking that digital table tennis was a good idea long before Pong proved him right. These days, he's 90 years young, and still inventing as if his best days are ahead of him. Photographer David Friedman has embarked on quite the interesting side project, lining up a number of interviews that profile some of the world's most quietly influential folk; in the effort of concealing spoilers, we'll simply encourage you to tap the play button below after you're settled in. It's a solid watch, regardless of whether you're familiar with the man, the myth or the legend.

Continue reading Ralph Baer, video game mastermind, sits down for inventor portrait video

Ralph Baer, video game mastermind, sits down for inventor portrait video originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 12 Mar 2012 15:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink MAKE, Joystiq  |  sourceDavid Friedman Photography, Vimeo  | Email this | Comments

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Darren Murph

March 12th

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Wilson Greatbatch, The Man Who Accidentally Invented The Pacemaker, Has Died [Video]

Wilson Greatbatch has died at the age of 92. He was a lifelong inventor. And like many inventors, his most notable creation, the implantable cardiac pacemaker, was discovered accidentally. More »


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Kelly Hodgkins

September 28th

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