Tags Invention

If This Product is Real, We’ve Passed Peak Vibrator

Someone please tell me this is a hoax. Announced yesterday with a tweet, the IziVibe claims to be a vibrating dildo you attach to your phone.

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November 13th

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Here’s the First Penile Prosthetic That Actually Worked

Until the early 1970s, if problems with penile blood flow or nerve function meant a guy couldn’t get it up, his choices for treatment were pretty limited, and certainly did not mimic nature.

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July 17th

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Two Sex Tracking Wearables That Might Actually Make It to Market

Given the explosion of sex advice and tracking apps for smartphones and the popularity of wearable fitness trackers, it was only a matter of time before they were combined into devices for more intimate activities. Perhaps it’s an idea whose time has come: two companies have announced plans to release “sex trackers”.

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Diane Kelly on throb, shared by Annalee Newitz to Gizmodo

June 12th

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How the Tea Bag Was Invented

Legend says that brewing tea dates back to around 2737 BC, when tea leaves fell into water being boiled for Emperor Shennong of China. There does not appear to be any hard evidence of tea being discovered this way, but evidence we do have suggests that brewing tea did indeed likely start in China, first as part of a medicinal elixir. The first documented reference to this is found during the Shang Dynasty (1600 BC to 1046 BC). By the Qin Dynasty in the third century BC, it had become a relatively popular drink using just the tea (camellia sinensis), rather than mixed with other things as seems to have been common when used medicinally. From the beginning until the early 20th century, very little innovation came about in terms of the common method of brewing tea. This all changed in 1901.

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Sarah Stone - TodayIFoundOut.com

April 27th

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How the Nature of Invention Has Changed Over the Past 150 Years

Not all inventions are born equal. Some spring from nowhere to create an entirely new class of technology; others assemble existing ideas to create useful new products. Now, researchers have shown that the past century’s seen a steady increase in invention by the combination of concepts—but less in the way of pure discovery.

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Jamie Condliffe

April 24th

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How Scotch Was Invented

How Scotch Was Invented

Scotch has been referred to as "the water of life," and to many who know its allure today, they can understand why. Yet the chronicle of this sometimes, smoky, often nutty, occasionally fruity elixir is poorly known, and in fact, its precise origin is lost to the mists of time (or more likely, drinking Scotch).

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Melissa - TODAYIFOUNDOUT.COM

July 3rd

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An Occult History of the Television Set

An Occult History of the Television Set

The origin of the television set was heavily shrouded in both spiritualism and the occult, writes author Stefan Andriopoulos in his new book Ghostly Apparitions. In fact, as its very name implies, the television was first conceived as a technical device for seeing at a distance: like the telephone (speaking at a distance) and telescope (viewing at a distance), the television was intended as an almost magical box through which we could watch distant events unfold, a kind of technological crystal ball.

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Geoff Manaugh

February 13th

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A genius guy invented the perfect machine to make a single cookie

A genius guy invented the perfect machine to make a single cookie

Here's the thing about chocolate chip cookies: they're delicious. Here's another thing: unless you're a professional baker maestro who bakes a batch everyday and tweaks their cookie recipe after every time to adjust the flavor, it's going to be hard to come up with the perfect chocolate chip cookie recipe. It's a numbers game, you just don't bake enough to figure out exactly what works. Not anymore. Not with this machine. This is perfection.

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Casey Chan on Sploid, shared by Casey Chan to Gizmodo

January 14th

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Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Arthur P Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Engadget learned that Arthur P. Stern passed away on May 24th, 2012, but just this week, The Los Angeles Times has published a laudable look back at a man that had an enormous impact on the technology that we rely on -- and, quite frankly, take for granted -- each and every day. Born in 1925 in Budapest, Hungary, Arthur went on to obtain an M.E.E. from Syracuse University, joining General Electric in 1951 and making a near-immediate impact in the realm of television. He's widely credited with pioneering the color TV that we're familiar with today (and holding a related patent -- number 2920132 -- granted in December of 1953), while also publishing initial technical papers on transistor radios. As if that weren't enough, he was also instrumental in the progress of GPS, spearheading the development of key elements in the latter portion of his career.

As fantastic as Stern was as an inventor, he was also a beloved grandfather to Joanna Stern, one of the industry's premiere technology reporters. Currently, Joanna works at ABC News, though she has spent time at LAPTOP Magazine, The Verge and right here at Engadget prior. From the entire staff, our deepest sympathies go out to a wonderful colleague and peer. The world has lost a brilliant mind, but on a personal level, a friend has lost much more.

Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 08 Jun 2012 19:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Joanna Stern (Twitter)  |  sourceLos Angeles Times, Joanna Stern (Tumblr)  | Email this | Comments

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Darren Murph

June 8th

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Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Arthur P Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away

Engadget learned that Arthur P. Stern passed away on May 24th, 2012, but just this week, The Los Angeles Times has published a laudable look back at a man that had an enormous impact on the technology that we rely on -- and, quite frankly, take for granted -- each and every day. Born in 1925 in Budapest, Hungary, Arthur went on to obtain an M.E.E. from Syracuse University, joining General Electric in 1951 and making a near-immediate impact in the realm of television. He's widely credited with pioneering the color TV that we're familiar with today (and holding a related patent -- number 2920132 -- granted in December of 1953), while also publishing initial technical papers on transistor radios. As if that weren't enough, he was also instrumental in the progress of GPS, spearheading the development of key elements in the latter portion of his career.

As fantastic as Stern was as an inventor, he was also a beloved grandfather to Joanna Stern, one of the industry's premiere technology reporters. Currently, Joanna works at ABC News, though she has spent time at LAPTOP Magazine, The Verge and right here at Engadget prior. From the entire staff, our deepest sympathies go out to a wonderful colleague and peer. The world has lost a brilliant mind, but on a personal level, a friend has lost much more.

Arthur P. Stern, instrumental in inventing the color television and GPS, passes away originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 08 Jun 2012 19:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Joanna Stern (Twitter)  |  sourceLos Angeles Times, Joanna Stern (Tumblr)  | Email this | Comments

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Darren Murph

June 8th

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