Tags Htc evo 4g lte

Sprint to launch HD Voice by the end of the year

Sprint HD Voice Launch

Sprint (S) is planning to launch its HD Voice service for the HTC EVO 4G LTE by the end of the year, according to PhoneScoop. The feature, which was demonstrated at the company’s EVO 4G LTE launch event this past April, dramatically improves call quality but it requires both handsets support the service in order to be used. To ensure the quality of HD Voice, Sprint will need to upgrade a “critical mass” of its markets with various network improvements and launch additional smartphones that are compatible with the new feature. HD Voice will initially launch in select markets in 2012 and won’t become widely available until 2013 and 2014.

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Dan Graziano

August 8th

Mobile

HTC Evo 4G LTE Review: I Can’t See Why Not

IMG_5124

Short Version

The Evo 4G LTE is a fine phone. There certainly aren’t any glaring issues: Sense has been considerably streamlined, and it’s really good at what it was made to do, which is entertain. The design language is a little loud, though maybe that’s what it takes to shake things up in the land of Android. (LAndroid.) But unlike the Evos that have come before it, this latest iteration doesn’t really bring any truly special features to the table.

I mean, consider the name. It’s the Evo 4G LTE, yet Sprint’s 4G LTE network isn’t set to go live for another month, at the very earliest. And even if that weren’t the case, LTE is no longer a wow factor. It’s a soon-to-be norm, which means that the Evo needs something more than fast data to be a big deal.

Does it have what it takes? Let’s find out together, yes?

Pros:

  • Excellent camera
  • Pretty solid battery life
  • Thin and light (in a good way)

Cons:

  • The plastic on the back gets marked up with prints easily
  • It’s a 4G phone, but Sprint LTE won’t be around for a while

Features:

  • 4.7-inch 720p display
  • Sprint 4G LTE (eventually)
  • Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich/Sense 4
  • 1.5GHz Snapdragon S4 dual-core proc
  • 8-megapixel rear camera (1080p recording)
  • 1.3-megapixel front-facing camera
  • MSRP: $199.99 on-contract

Long Version

Hardware/Design:

As I mentioned before in my initial impressions post, the Evo feels like business in the front and a party in the back. The bezel is quite thin, which means that HTC managed to comfortably fit a rather large 4.7-inch display onto a smaller frame (thumbs-up for that!), and the top bezel near the speaker grill is finished with soft-touch rubber.

On the back, however, the Evo tells a different story. A strip of shiny red metal separates a soft-touch bottom and a shiny, black plastic top. Within the plastic area, the camera is square in the middle, with a little extra Evo-esque red lining. I’m a huge fan of the soft-touch and honestly wish that the entire backside of the phone was finished in it. It’s comfortable and doesn’t take prints much at all.

The plastic, on the other hand, picks up prints like it’s being paid to do so. It feels a bit like HTC ran out of budgeting dollars and simply said “F&#* it! Let’s just slap some plastic on this last bit.” It’s the only part of the phone that feels cheap, even in the way that it creaks a bit when you stress the phone.

HTC nailed the kickstand, as you can prop the phone up with it in the traditional sense, as well as turn it right over so that the kickstand is resting against the table. Either way it works, which means that you can plug your phone into the charger while you’re kickstanding.

Just as you’d expect, the lock button and 3.5mm headphone jack are up top, microUSB is on the top left-hand side, and volume rocker is on the left. There’s also a dedicated camera shutter button on the bottom right-hand side of the phone.

Software:

As I already briefly covered, Sense 4 is far more attractive than earlier iterations. HTC clearly took a hard look at the UI and realized that too much fluff on top of Android is a big no-no. That said, this streamlined, clean version of the custom overlay offers only what you need.

One nice touch is the ability to drag and drop icons from the lock screen into the circle used to unlock the device. By doing so, you’re taken straight into the dragged app. The less clicks the better, am I right?

At the same time, we’re not seeing anything incredibly new here. No pop-up play, like on the Galaxy S III. No brand new operating system, like on the Galaxy Nexus. But that’s not to say that HTC doesn’t offer up some solid, albeit a bit played out, features.

For one, you’ll get 25 free GB of Dropbox storage with this bad boy, along with Beats Audio integration. I see the former as much more of a selling point. Oh, and Google Wallet comes pre-loaded, as well.

Sprint’s loaded this thing up with plenty of its own content, including Sprint Zone and Sprint Hotspot, and unfortunately it doesn’t seem that you can uninstall them.

Camera:

The camera on this phone rocks. It employs the Sense camera app on the software side of things, which means you’ll have easy access to plenty of Instagram-esque filters even in the viewfinder. A couple of my personal faves are Vintage, Solarize, and Aqua.

There are also plenty of settings for ISO, white balance, etc., and zoom is on the left. Shooting modes include auto, HDR, Panorama and portrait, but there seems to be some sort of auto-burst mode inherent in the app. In other words, when you hold down the shutter, you get a continuous stream of shots.

The shutter button itself is incredibly fast, snapping pictures as soon as you touch it. It’s also very solid — no shakiness or looseness in its socket — and can be half-pressed to focus and then full-pressed to shoot (just like on a DSLR).

Color reproduction was excellent, though I think that HTC tends to blow out warmer colors like reds and yellows to make pictures more beautiful, but not necessarily realistic. Low light shots turned out better than expected, and video recording only takes a second to focus and switch between bright and low light.

The camera app has some nice features to it, as well, like the fact that it goes into a thumbnail mode if you start swiping through pictures quickly. It’s like the phone knows you want a photo that’s way on down the line, and wants to help you get there. The only problem is that it only works like half the time.

Comparison shot between the Evo 4G LTE (left) and the iPhone 4S (right):

Display:

There’s more to a display than resolution or size. It’s the marriage of these two factors, along with the technology behind the screen that makes an excellent display. In the case of the HTC Evo 4G LTE display, this marriage is a harmonious one. The 720×1280 display measures in at 4.7-inches diagonally, which yields a ppi of 312. This is pretty good.

For reference, the iPhone has a 326ppi, so the Evo isn’t far off but with much more real estate. At the same time, the Evo has a TFT LCD display, rather than the more favorable AMOLED-style displays we see on most Samsung phones. I still found the display to be excellent, with little to no differentiation from pixel to pixel and bright, brilliant colors.

I also think it’s worth taking a moment to talk about the size of this display as it relates to using the phone. Most phones with 4.3-inch or greater screens tend to get a bit uncomfortable. It can be difficult to reach across the screen while performing one-handed actions, depending on the aspect ratio.

But HTC has found a way to master slapping giant displays on comfortably small frames. The Titan II is a great example of this, and the new tradition only continues here on the Evo. Well done, HTC.

Performance:

Performance is becoming less and less of a factor. The spec is dead, in many cases. In fact, the only specs I consider useful on a smartphone are the display and camera specs, and even then a solid understanding of the numbers and their context is necessary. But rarely — very rarely — a phone’s performance will be so smooth in real-world use that it’s reflected in the testing.

So is the case with the Evo 4G LTE, and really most of HTC’s handsets lately. The Titan II was an incredibly smooth phone, but on a different platform like Windows Phone it’s unfair to compare. But the HTC One S, another Android 4.0/Sense 4 combo, was also found to be exceptional in browsing, app play, and the like.

Here are the numbers:

In Quadrant, a full-fledged benchmarker with a focus on graphics performance, the Evo 4G LTE scored a 4285. The only phone I’ve had that’s tested better is the One S, with most others staying well below the 3000 mark. In Browsermark, a web browsing test, the phone scored a 90,995, which is again just below the One S’s score of 100,662, but exceeding most others in its category.

Data speeds averaged around 1.4Mbps down and .72Mbps up, but that should go up once Sprint’s LTE network goes live.

Battery:

The new Evo’s battery is considerably larger than its predecessors and really most other smartphones on the market, at 2000mAh. The Droid Razr Maxx, which is basically built around its battery performance, has a 3300mAh battery. That said, the Evo 4G LTE lasted four and a half hours in testing, which includes an always-waking constant Google image search. The Droid Razr Maxx lasted for eight hours and fifteen minutes.

But still, the Evo 4G LTE’s battery is definitely better than most. It would hang with me for more than a full day on some occasions, with easy use. On days I spent fully reviewing the phone, it still got past dinner time, which is sadly very good these days. The battery is not removable.

Head-To-Head With The Galaxy Nexus And iPhone 4S:

Check out our thoughts on this match-up here.

Hands-On Video: Fly or Die

Conclusion

To be quite honest, the biggest issue I have with this phone is its design. I’m not a fan of the bubbly camera sensor that bulges out of the backside of the phone. I’m uncomfortable with this shiny black plastic, and the red stripe across the back is a bit much for me. But that’s totally my preference, and there are probably plenty of people out there who enjoy this type of differentiation.

That said, I can’t find much else wrong with it. The Evo 4G LTE is thin and light, but not so light that it feels cheap. It has a great display with plenty of real-estate, yet still manages to be comfortable in the hand. The camera is excellent, as is the software paired with it, and I never really noticed too much lag or any freeze-ups during a week of testing. Throw in 25 free GB of Dropbox storage and the promise of LTE in the next few months and then ask me: Should you spend $200 and sign a two-year contract for Sprint’s unlimited data? (While you still can?)

I can’t see why not.

Check out all of our Evo 4G LTE review posts here.



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Jordan Crook

June 2nd

Uncategorized

HTC Evo 4G LTE Review: I Can’t See Why Not

IMG_5124

Short Version

The Evo 4G LTE is a fine phone. There certainly aren’t any glaring issues: Sense has been considerably streamlined, and it’s really good at what it was made to do, which is entertain. The design language is a little loud, though maybe that’s what it takes to shake things up in the land of Android. (LAndroid.) But unlike the Evos that have come before it, this latest iteration doesn’t really bring any truly special features to the table.

I mean, consider the name. It’s the Evo 4G LTE, yet Sprint’s 4G LTE network isn’t set to go live for another month, at the very earliest. And even if that weren’t the case, LTE is no longer a wow factor. It’s a soon-to-be norm, which means that the Evo needs something more than fast data to be a big deal.

Does it have what it takes? Let’s find out together, yes?

Pros:

  • Excellent camera
  • Pretty solid battery life
  • Thin and light (in a good way)

Cons:

  • The plastic on the back gets marked up with prints easily
  • It’s a 4G phone, but Sprint LTE won’t be around for a while

Features:

  • 4.7-inch 720p display
  • Sprint 4G LTE (eventually)
  • Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich/Sense 4
  • 1.5GHz Snapdragon S4 dual-core proc
  • 8-megapixel rear camera (1080p recording)
  • 1.3-megapixel front-facing camera
  • MSRP: $199.99 on-contract

Long Version

Hardware/Design:

As I mentioned before in my initial impressions post, the Evo feels like business in the front and a party in the back. The bezel is quite thin, which means that HTC managed to comfortably fit a rather large 4.7-inch display onto a smaller frame (thumbs-up for that!), and the top bezel near the speaker grill is finished with soft-touch rubber.

On the back, however, the Evo tells a different story. A strip of shiny red metal separates a soft-touch bottom and a shiny, black plastic top. Within the plastic area, the camera is square in the middle, with a little extra Evo-esque red lining. I’m a huge fan of the soft-touch and honestly wish that the entire backside of the phone was finished in it. It’s comfortable and doesn’t take prints much at all.

The plastic, on the other hand, picks up prints like it’s being paid to do so. It feels a bit like HTC ran out of budgeting dollars and simply said “F&#* it! Let’s just slap some plastic on this last bit.” It’s the only part of the phone that feels cheap, even in the way that it creaks a bit when you stress the phone.

HTC nailed the kickstand, as you can prop the phone up with it in the traditional sense, as well as turn it right over so that the kickstand is resting against the table. Either way it works, which means that you can plug your phone into the charger while you’re kickstanding.

Just as you’d expect, the lock button and 3.5mm headphone jack are up top, microUSB is on the top left-hand side, and volume rocker is on the left. There’s also a dedicated camera shutter button on the bottom right-hand side of the phone.

Software:

As I already briefly covered, Sense 4 is far more attractive than earlier iterations. HTC clearly took a hard look at the UI and realized that too much fluff on top of Android is a big no-no. That said, this streamlined, clean version of the custom overlay offers only what you need.

One nice touch is the ability to drag and drop icons from the lock screen into the circle used to unlock the device. By doing so, you’re taken straight into the dragged app. The less clicks the better, am I right?

At the same time, we’re not seeing anything incredibly new here. No pop-up play, like on the Galaxy S III. No brand new operating system, like on the Galaxy Nexus. But that’s not to say that HTC doesn’t offer up some solid, albeit a bit played out, features.

For one, you’ll get 25 free GB of Dropbox storage with this bad boy, along with Beats Audio integration. I see the former as much more of a selling point. Oh, and Google Wallet comes pre-loaded, as well.

Sprint’s loaded this thing up with plenty of its own content, including Sprint Zone and Sprint Hotspot, and unfortunately it doesn’t seem that you can uninstall them.

Camera:

The camera on this phone rocks. It employs the Sense camera app on the software side of things, which means you’ll have easy access to plenty of Instagram-esque filters even in the viewfinder. A couple of my personal faves are Vintage, Solarize, and Aqua.

There are also plenty of settings for ISO, white balance, etc., and zoom is on the left. Shooting modes include auto, HDR, Panorama and portrait, but there seems to be some sort of auto-burst mode inherent in the app. In other words, when you hold down the shutter, you get a continuous stream of shots.

The shutter button itself is incredibly fast, snapping pictures as soon as you touch it. It’s also very solid — no shakiness or looseness in its socket — and can be half-pressed to focus and then full-pressed to shoot (just like on a DSLR).

Color reproduction was excellent, though I think that HTC tends to blow out warmer colors like reds and yellows to make pictures more beautiful, but not necessarily realistic. Low light shots turned out better than expected, and video recording only takes a second to focus and switch between bright and low light.

The camera app has some nice features to it, as well, like the fact that it goes into a thumbnail mode if you start swiping through pictures quickly. It’s like the phone knows you want a photo that’s way on down the line, and wants to help you get there. The only problem is that it only works like half the time.

Comparison shot between the Evo 4G LTE (left) and the iPhone 4S (right):

Display:

There’s more to a display than resolution or size. It’s the marriage of these two factors, along with the technology behind the screen that makes an excellent display. In the case of the HTC Evo 4G LTE display, this marriage is a harmonious one. The 720×1280 display measures in at 4.7-inches diagonally, which yields a ppi of 312. This is pretty good.

For reference, the iPhone has a 326ppi, so the Evo isn’t far off but with much more real estate. At the same time, the Evo has a TFT LCD display, rather than the more favorable AMOLED-style displays we see on most Samsung phones. I still found the display to be excellent, with little to no differentiation from pixel to pixel and bright, brilliant colors.

I also think it’s worth taking a moment to talk about the size of this display as it relates to using the phone. Most phones with 4.3-inch or greater screens tend to get a bit uncomfortable. It can be difficult to reach across the screen while performing one-handed actions, depending on the aspect ratio.

But HTC has found a way to master slapping giant displays on comfortably small frames. The Titan II is a great example of this, and the new tradition only continues here on the Evo. Well done, HTC.

Performance:

Performance is becoming less and less of a factor. The spec is dead, in many cases. In fact, the only specs I consider useful on a smartphone are the display and camera specs, and even then a solid understanding of the numbers and their context is necessary. But rarely — very rarely — a phone’s performance will be so smooth in real-world use that it’s reflected in the testing.

So is the case with the Evo 4G LTE, and really most of HTC’s handsets lately. The Titan II was an incredibly smooth phone, but on a different platform like Windows Phone it’s unfair to compare. But the HTC One S, another Android 4.0/Sense 4 combo, was also found to be exceptional in browsing, app play, and the like.

Here are the numbers:

In Quadrant, a full-fledged benchmarker with a focus on graphics performance, the Evo 4G LTE scored a 4285. The only phone I’ve had that’s tested better is the One S, with most others staying well below the 3000 mark. In Browsermark, a web browsing test, the phone scored a 90,995, which is again just below the One S’s score of 100,662, but exceeding most others in its category.

Data speeds averaged around 1.4Mbps down and .72Mbps up, but that should go up once Sprint’s LTE network goes live.

Battery:

The new Evo’s battery is considerably larger than its predecessors and really most other smartphones on the market, at 2000mAh. The Droid Razr Maxx, which is basically built around its battery performance, has a 3300mAh battery. That said, the Evo 4G LTE lasted four and a half hours in testing, which includes an always-waking constant Google image search. The Droid Razr Maxx lasted for eight hours and fifteen minutes.

But still, the Evo 4G LTE’s battery is definitely better than most. It would hang with me for more than a full day on some occasions, with easy use. On days I spent fully reviewing the phone, it still got past dinner time, which is sadly very good these days. The battery is not removable.

Head-To-Head With The Galaxy Nexus And iPhone 4S:

Check out our thoughts on this match-up here.

Hands-On Video: Fly or Die

Conclusion

To be quite honest, the biggest issue I have with this phone is its design. I’m not a fan of the bubbly camera sensor that bulges out of the backside of the phone. I’m uncomfortable with this shiny black plastic, and the red stripe across the back is a bit much for me. But that’s totally my preference, and there are probably plenty of people out there who enjoy this type of differentiation.

That said, I can’t find much else wrong with it. The Evo 4G LTE is thin and light, but not so light that it feels cheap. It has a great display with plenty of real-estate, yet still manages to be comfortable in the hand. The camera is excellent, as is the software paired with it, and I never really noticed too much lag or any freeze-ups during a week of testing. Throw in 25 free GB of Dropbox storage and the promise of LTE in the next few months and then ask me: Should you spend $200 and sign a two-year contract for Sprint’s unlimited data? (While you still can?)

I can’t see why not.

Check out all of our Evo 4G LTE review posts here.



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Jordan Crook

June 2nd

Uncategorized

HTC Evo 4G LTE Review: Head-To-Head With The iPhone 4S And The Galaxy Nexus

htc-evo-lead

The Evo 4G LTE is one of the best phones to land on Sprint shelves in a while, but that’s not to say it has no competition over at the Yellow carrier. The Galaxy Nexus has propped itself up as the Android phone to beat, while the iPhone 4S is available at the same price: $199.

So what will it take to pass up the iPhone and the GalNex for the latest iteration of the Evo line?

We’ve put together this head-to-head chart to answer just such a question.

As you can see, specs between the Evo and the GalNex are quite similar. The only noticeable differences come by way of UI and design language. If a pure Android experience is what you’re looking for, I would definitely recommend the Galaxy Nexus running Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

But there are also some HTC fans out there who happen to love the Sense UI, in which case the Evo would likely be the right choice. The design language is rather strong on the Evo 4G LTE, with soft touch gray, red metal, and shiny black plastic comprising the backside of the handset. The GalNex is a bit more reserved.

And still, there’s the iPhone 4S to consider. Sure, the display is much smaller (3.5-in vs 4.65/.7-in), but the Retina display easily rivals much larger 720p displays. And few can resist the beautiful minimalist design of the iPhone and the intuitive functionality of iOS.

Luckily, the decision is yours and not mine. Enjoy!

Hands-on initial impressions of the Evo 4G LTE can be found here, and a full review will go live in the next couple days. Stay tuned!



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Jordan Crook

May 30th

Uncategorized

HTC Evo 4G LTE Review: Initial Impressions (Hands-On Photos)

photo8

Evo.

It’s one of the few HTC/Sprint product lines to make a splash in the mobile ocean, and after a brief stay at U.S. customs, the latest iteration should do the same.

The Evo 4G LTE is the most powerful Evo to date, with a 4.7-inch 720p display, a 1.5GHz dual-core processor, and 1GB of RAM under the hood. But these specs are in no way novel, which means that quite a bit comes down to HTC’s software offerings and design language.

Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich is running the show on this puppy, with HTC’s now-usual 25GB of free Dropbox storage and Beats Audio integration also in tow. The former two are excellent features to have and should be considered when you’re weighing your various mobile options, but I can’t honestly say that the Beats Audio makes much of a difference.

In the design department, there’s quite a bit going on. The front of the phone looks like any standard Android phone that’s come out in the past six months: a large touchscreen, three capacitive buttons within a black bezel, and black edges with rounded corners. In short, the Evo 4G LTE face is nothing to write home about, though I am impressed with the way that HTC managed to squeeze a 4.7-inch display onto a comfortably compact body.

The back of the phone tells a different story. It’s a bit like a mullet — business up front, party in the back.

You’ll find a really nice soft-touch black finish along the bottom two-thirds of the phone’s backside, divided with a bright red, metallic-y kickstand, and finished up top with shiny plastic. The plastic grabs prints like that’s its sole purpose in this world, but the overall aesthetic is quite nice, and the soft-touch finish along the bottom is pleasant as can be.

I haven’t noticed any glaring issues in performance and battery life seems to be pretty good, but we can’t be certain of anything until I complete official testing. In other words, stay tuned for our full review which will go live this week.



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Jordan Crook

May 29th

Uncategorized

Sprint HTC EVO 4G LTE user guide slips out, tells you what you already know

sprint htc evo 4g lte guide

Whether or not Sprint's version of HTC's One X is indeed shipping on May 18th remains to be seen, but one thing's for sure: it'll almost definitely hit store shelves prior to Sprint's LTE network going live. Following the Galaxy Nexus' footsteps in that regard, the EVO 4G LTE seems to have no shame in its game, and the 219 page user manual has floated out for those interested in getting a head start on understanding their future superphone. The PDF's linked in the source for your perusal, but don't go digging for any of life's secrets. Well, there is a section on Private Browsing, but you know....

Sprint HTC EVO 4G LTE user guide slips out, tells you what you already know originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 May 2012 19:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Android Central  |  sourceInside Sprint Now [PDF]  | Email this | Comments

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Darren Murph

May 8th

Uncategorized

HTC’s behind the scenes video suggests EVO 3D successor in the works [video]

Sprint and HTC on Wednesday held a joint press conference during which the companies showed off the new EVO 4G LTE. During the presentation, the companies played a brief behind the scenes video starring their latest handset. As it turns out, the video features a brief cameo of a prototype handset equipped with dual cameras and dual-LED flash. The unannounced device features a similar design to the EVO 4G LTE, leading many to suspect that it could be the follow up to HTC’s EVO 3D — perhaps the HTC EVO 3D 4G LTE. Then again, this could simply be a prototype in one of HTC’s labs that may never see the light of day. HTC’s video can be found after the break.

[Via The Verge]

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Dan Graziano

April 6th

Uncategorized

Hands on with Sprint’s HTC EVO 4G LTE

Sprint and HTC have been partners for years, but it wasn’t until the HTC EVO 4G launched in June 2010 that the companies realized their potential. HTC’s sleek, technology-packed flagship smartphone and Sprint’s unlimited data plans were a match made in heaven for smartphone power users, and the EVO 4G was the first handset to truly offer a complete package to Sprint subscribers. While Sprint’s EVO line of devices has remained popular for the carrier — Sprint has sold more than 7 million EVO-branded smartphones and tablets to date — the company has yet to recapture the magic introduced with the original EVO 4G. With the new HTC EVO 4G LTE that Sprint and HTC unveiled on Wednesday, however, Sprint hopes to do just that. Hit the break for our hands-on impressions of Sprint’s new flagship smartphone.


We spent some time with Sprint’s flagship device for 2012 ahead of tonight’s press conference, and we left impressed. Powerhouse Android smartphones seem to be a dime a dozen these days, and although the EVO 4G LTE is certainly a cut above almost every device currently on the market, it doesn’t quite recapture the magic created by the EVO 4G, which was among the first of its kind.

The handset’s hardware is truly unique, and it is instantly recognizable as an EVO device. The red accents are unmistakable and the kickstand made famous by the EVO 4G is back — and improved. The red aluminum kickstand on the EVO 4G LTE is now spring-loaded, so it can support the device in landscape orientation with the display turned to the left or to the right.

The case on the EVO 4G LTE is made from a single piece of anodized aluminum that has a great look and a nice, soft feel. As an added touch and a means of further distinguishing this smartphone from the pack, HTC machined the edges of the smartphone to remove the anodized coating and leave a smooth polished aluminum finish that circles the outer edge of the device.

While we weren’t able to spend as much time as we would have liked with this sleek new smartphone, we did give it a quick spin and walked away very impressed. The 4.7-inch Super LCD display with 720p HD resolution is absolutely gorgeous, and the dual-core 1.5GHz Snapdragon S4 processor helps the Sense 4.0 user interface jump from screen to screen with ease. We fired up as many apps as we could launch on the new EVO and the phone was completely unphased.

Our biggest qualm with the handset after the short amount of time we spent with it is absolutely the styling. This is a slick smartphone with a unibody anodized aluminum case and brushed detailing on the edges, but it is completely ruined by the glossy black cover at the top of the device’s back. HTC had to use a material that would allow radio waves to easily pass through, but a matte rubber-feel plastic like the material used on the back of the HTC One S would have looked infinitely better. We’re sure there is a reason HTC chose the material it did, but the glossy plastic really does ruin the look of this otherwise sleek smartphone.

While Sprint hasn’t yet announced a release time frame beyond some time in the second quarter, the HTC EVO 4G LTE will be available for pre-order starting May 7th, and it will cost $199.99 on contract. We’re definitely looking forward to reviewing this new flagship smartphone but in the meantime, be sure to check out our hands on photos of the HTC EVO 4G LTE, which are linked above.

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Zach Epstein

April 4th

Uncategorized

Sprint unveils the HTC EVO 4G LTE, launching in Q2 for $199.99

Sprint and HTC on Wednesday unveiled the HTC EVO 4G LTE during a joint press conference in New York City. As a customized version of the HTC One X, Sprint’s new flagship smartphone features a 4.7-inch Super LCD display with 720p HD resolution, a dual-core 1.5GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, an 8-megapixel camera powered by a dedicated ImageChip, Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, Sense 4.0, 16GB of internal storage plus microSDHC support, 1GB of RAM, NFC, 4G LTE and a 2,000 mAh battery. The smartphone will also be Sprint’s first device to feature HD voice, an enhancement that will be enabled by Sprint’s Network Vision efforts. The service is not yet enabled, but we were told that the difference between standard voice and HD voice is akin to the difference between a standard-resolution television and an HDTV. HTC EVO 4G LTE pre-sales begin May 7th for $199.99 on contract, and the device will launch some time in the second quarter. Sprint and HTC’s joint press release follows below, and be sure to check out BGR’s hands-on preview of the HTC EVO 4G LTE.

HTC EVO 4G LTE, Exclusively from Sprint, First HD Voice-capable Smartphone Available in the U.S.;
Offers Best-in-Class Features, including Beats Audio,
Amazing Camera and HD Display

Next-generation EVO offers the ability to enjoy industry-leading features
without fear of overage charges or throttling with unlimited data plans
for new and existing Sprint customers

Available in Q2 for $199.99; Register for updates at www.sprint.com/evo4glte

NEW YORK – April 4, 2012 – Sprint (NYSE: S), the only national wireless carrier offering truly unlimited data for all phones while on the Sprint network1, and HTC, a global designer of smartphones, announce the next evolution of the  award-winning HTC EVO™ family: HTC EVO™ 4G LTE. HTC EVO 4G LTE focuses on exceptional improvements in camera technology, audio and voice quality on both the network and device.

HTC EVO 4G LTE will be available in the second quarter for $199.99 (excludes taxes and surcharges). The availability date will be announced later. Customers can sign up for updates today at www.sprint.com/evo4glte, and pre-order will begin Monday, May 7, at www.sprint.com.

HTC EVO 4G LTE is built on Android™ 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich, integrated with HTC Sense™ 4. HTC EVO 4G LTE boasts brilliant features, including a vibrant 4.7-inch HD display, HD voice capabilities, 1.5GHz dual-core processor, large 2000mAh embedded battery and dual-cameras (8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.3-megapixel front-facing) with instant capture capability. HTC EVO 4G LTE brings back the fan-favorite kickstand built into the smartphone’s refined, slim design.

With the launch of HTC EVO 4G LTE, Sprint becomes the first U.S. carrier to announce plans for a nationwide HD Voice network beginning in late 2012 as part of Sprint’s Network Vision program.

HD Voice is the next-generation evolution of voice quality and the future of voice communications for mobile phones. The service will provide fuller, more natural-sounding and less fatiguing voice quality and should reduce troublesome background noises often found in a cafe or on the street.2 Users should expect to identify voices and hear every word better than ever. Sprint’s commitment to HD Voice starts with HTC EVO 4G LTE, Sprint’s first HD Voice capable device.

“Sprint has a long history of leading the wireless industry in innovation, and the debut of HTC EVO 4G LTE marks another chapter in that innovation story,” said Sprint CEO Dan Hesse. “Once again, we are partnering with HTC to deliver the benchmark Android device for the year with the next generation of our award-winning EVO brand. We know our customers will appreciate the focus on audio and voice quality with EVO 4G LTE, including the addition of Beats Audio and HD Voice capability.”

HTC EVO 4G LTE is Sprint’s first device with HTC’s Authentic Sound experience integrating Beats Audio™. The technology enables customers to hear music the way the artist intended with unique audio tuning that delivers thundering bass, soaring midrange and crisp highs.

HTC EVO 4G LTE incorporates Beats Audio across the entire phone experience, including playing music stored on the device, streaming from a favorite service, watching a movie or YouTube™ video, or playing the latest hot game. HTC Sync Manager software also lets users easily get their music on the device from their PC, and it works with current programs, including iTunes®.

“The partnership between HTC and Sprint has resulted in one of the most popular and successful smartphone brands of all time with over 7 million EVO devices sold to date,” said Jason Mackenzie, president, HTC Corporation. “With HTC EVO 4G LTE, we’ve created a desirable successor that is sure to excite the millions of current EVO customers and beyond with HTC’s distinct design, amazing camera and authentic sound.”

ADVANCING SMARTPHONE PHOTOGRAPHY

HTC EVO 4G LTE makes mobile photography and video easy and intuitive.

  • The on-screen photo and video buttons are right next to each other so users don’t have to switch modes. This allows the user to take video and still photos concurrently.
  • It makes the whole idea of “video mode” or “photo mode” irrelevant. While shooting a video, the user can just tap the shutter button and it captures a still image of that exact moment. Still images can also be captured during video playback.
  • HTC EVO 4G LTE’s camera has a super-fast start-up and auto-focus time. With the fast auto-focus, users can easily stay with a moving object or person, taking numerous pictures just by holding the shutter button.

In addition, HTC ImageSense™ technology combines hardware and software advancements to the camera lens, sensor and software, including integration of a new custom HTC ImageChip, to take great photos even in adverse conditions. The best-in-class f/2.0 camera lens lets in 44 percent more light than the lenses used on most camera phones. The Smart Flash also adjusts the flash strength based on how far away the object is, so users won’t get photos where everything looks washed out.

REFINED STYLE AND DESIGN

Crafted from aluminum spaceframe in an anodized black finish, HTC EVO 4G LTE delivers cutting-edge function and style in a thin and distinctive design. The smartphone’s 4.7-inch display and 80-degree viewing angle makes it easier to share pictures and video with others. The multiposition kickstand allows users to watch videos hands-free.

HTC EVO 4G LTE customers can enjoy an unlimited data experience with Sprint Everything Data plans. Sprint’s Everything Data plan with Any Mobile, AnytimeSM includes unlimited Web, texting and calling to and from any mobile in America while on the Sprint Network, starting at just $79.99 per month for smartphones3 – a savings of $40 per month vs. Verizon’s comparable plan with unlimited talk, text and 2GB Web, or $10 per month savings vs. Verizon’s 450-minute plan with unlimited text and 2GB Web.

Sprint recently announced Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Houston, Kansas City and San Antonio are expected to have 4G LTE and enhanced 3G service in mid-year 2012. Sprint 4G LTE will enable faster speeds for data applications, and the enhanced 3G service promises better signal strength, faster data speeds, expanded coverage and better in-building performance. The launch of these large metropolitan areas demonstrates the continued commitment by Sprint to invest in its network through Network Vision. Sprint customers in these areas will soon enjoy ultra-fast data speeds and improved 3G voice quality. Whether a Sprint customer is using a smartphone to share a video, checking the Web via a mobile hotspot, Sprint 4G LTE will make it easier. And, when someone makes an important voice call, they can expect to find a clearer connection and a stronger signal in more areas. For the most up-to-date details on Sprint’s 4G LTE rollout, please visit www.sprint.com/4GLTE.

Comments Off on Sprint unveils the HTC EVO 4G LTE, launching in Q2 for $199.99

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Zach Epstein

April 4th

Uncategorized

HTC Evo 4G LTE Hands On: One Serious Piece of Slick [Android]

When Sprint launched the original HTC Evo 4G, in the spring of 2010, it was arguably the best Android phone money could buy. Flash forward two years, and here comes the HTC Evo 4G LTE. Once again, it might just enter the market as the best Android phone money can buy. More »


Comments Off on HTC Evo 4G LTE Hands On: One Serious Piece of Slick [Android]

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brent rose

April 4th

Uncategorized
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