Tags DigiTimes

Report: New ultra-thin MacBooks coming later in 2016, featuring new metal-injection molded hinges

Although it seems inevitable that the MacBook lineup will see some significant changes this year, as a major upgrade has been due for a while, the rumor mill is yet to close in one particular design or release date. Earlier in the year, Digitimes was reporting new MacBooks (intended to supplant the MacBook Air) are due sometime before July, resembling 13 inch and 15 inch versions of the 12 inch Retina MacBook.

A new report from Digitimes today says otherwise, suggesting the new MacBooks will not be available until the second half of this year, although an announcement at WWDC still seems possible if Apple met the earlier side of that release range.

more…


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices, Mac, Tech Industry Tagged: Apple, DigiTimes, iOS, Mac, MacBook Pro, Retina MacBook, rumor

Comments Off on Report: New ultra-thin MacBooks coming later in 2016, featuring new metal-injection molded hinges

Photo

Benjamin Mayo

April 15th

Apple

Mac

Digitimes forecast says iPad sales could fall to a record low this quarter, dropping 20% year-on-year

ipad-sales

Digitimes Research has predicted that iPad sales could fall this quarter to their lowest level since 2011.

Apple is expected to ship 9.8 million iPads in the first quarter of 2016, historically its lowest quarterly level, with decreases of 39.1% on quarter and nearly 20% on year.

There are a couple of issues with the forecast – the first being the patchy track-record of the source, and the second being that the ‘historic low’ claim isn’t quite accurate if you include the first year or so, as the above graph from Statista shows.

But the graph does show something else …

Namely, that the claim is a plausible one. Remove the seasonal effect – sales always jump in the holiday quarter (Apple’s fiscal Q1) – and what we see here is a solid two-year decline. Fiscal Q2 sales declining from 19.48M in 2013 through 16.35M in 2014 to 12.62M in 2015. Project that line out into this year and the 9.8M number looks feasible.

The decline does, of course, need to be put into perspective. Digitimes still gives Apple by far the greatest share of the tablet market, at 21%, with Samsung some way back at 14% and everyone else in single digits. Even the iPad Pro, the most niche product in the range, looks likely to have sold more units in a single quarter than all the Microsoft Surface units ever sold.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has consistently said that he remains upbeat about the long-term prospects of the device, with our own Zac Hall recently laying out the reasons he thinks this is a reasonable view. The expected launch of the iPad Air 3 next month should also help the numbers, but not in this quarter.

Do you agree that the iPad can bounce back? Or do you see the decline continuing? Take our poll, and share the reasons for your view in the comments.


Filed under: iOS Devices Tagged: DigiTimes, Digitimes Research, iPad, ipad sales, iPads, Tablets

Continue reading more about iOS Devices, iPad, and DigiTimes at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Digitimes forecast says iPad sales could fall to a record low this quarter, dropping 20% year-on-year" with our community.

Comments Off on Digitimes forecast says iPad sales could fall to a record low this quarter, dropping 20% year-on-year

Photo

Ben Lovejoy

February 17th

Apple

Mac

Digitimes: Wistron joining Foxconn for iPhone 5se production, dual suppliers for iPhone 7 models to lower risk

FILE-In this Wednesday, May 26, 2010, file photo, staff members work on the production line at the Foxconn complex in Shenzhen, China. Foxconn, the company that makes Apple’s iPhones suspended production at a factory in China on Monday, Sept. 24, 2012, after a brawl by as many as 2,000 employees at a dormitory injured 40 people. The fight, the cause of which was under investigation, erupted Sunday night at a privately managed dormitory near a Foxconn Technology Group factory in the northern city of Taiyuan, the company and Chinese police said.(AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)

9to5Mac most recently reported Apple is planning to launch its new addition to the iPhone lineup on March 18th, a 4-inch ‘iPhone 5se’. Foxconn is leading production of the phone, as it does with most iPhone units. Digitimes is reporting that Apple is adding a new supplier to the mix to aid supply: Wistron.

Naturally, Wistron declined comment as 4-inch iPhone production is still a supposed secret. According to Digitimes, Apple is aiming to lower supply channel yield risks by contracting with multiple suppliers for iPhone models. This strategy will continue with iPhone 7 ….

Apple is moving to a supply chain setup where two manufacturers will be responsible for a particular phone size. The report indicates that the 4.7 inch iPhone 7 supply will be shared between Pegatron and Foxconn.

This matches the current iPhone 6s supply chain for the 4.7 inch screen size. For iPhone 7 Plus, Digitimes says the 5.5 inch phone will be made by both Wistron and Foxconn. The iPhone 5se assembly contract will help ramp Wistron for the millions of units demanded for the flagship iPhone 7 Plus later in the year.

Having two suppliers for each phone type increases competition for units (no doubt helping Apple’s profit margins) and reduces Apple’s supply-side risk. If one manufacturer encounters problems in production, the other company could step up to the plate. Although not much is known about the iPhone 7 yet, we expect to see it debut in the fall. The iPhone 7 is widely rumored to lose the 3.5mm headphone jack, replaced by Bluetooth wireless tech or Lightning headphones.

As usual, take some liberty with what you take from Digitimes. The accuracy of the publication is often sketchy, although it is generally more reliable on rumors relating directly to supply chain matters — like this story.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: DigiTimes, Foxconn, iPhone 5se, iPhone 7, suppliers, wistron

Check out 9to5Mac for more breaking coverage of AAPL Company, iOS Devices, and iOS.

What do you think? Discuss "Digitimes: Wistron joining Foxconn for iPhone 5se production, dual suppliers for iPhone 7 models to lower risk" with our community.

Comments Off on Digitimes: Wistron joining Foxconn for iPhone 5se production, dual suppliers for iPhone 7 models to lower risk

Photo

Benjamin Mayo

February 16th

Apple

Mac

Opinion: Apple rumors can be valuable forecasts of future trends, even if they’re imprecise

Theo Levey's early iPhone 6 render wasn't perfect, but it was usefully close

Theo Levey’s early iPhone 6 render wasn’t perfect, but it was usefully close

Reporting on future Apple products isn’t easy — it’s actually one of the biggest challenges in the world of technology journalism. Back in April 2011, The Verge’s predecessor (This Is My Next) ran a much-discussed report on the “iPhone 5,” which was claimed to be teardrop-shaped, with an enlarged, gesture-sensitive Home Button, and a bezel-less 3.7″ screen. NFC, inductive charging, and a speaker and sensors hidden behind the screen were also said to be possibilities for the new iPhone. Not surprisingly, the report lit up the Internet, generating a lot of attention (and over 500 comments) for a fledgling web site. Though some people were skeptical, accessory makers actually took the report seriously enough to manufacture cases matching the claims.

As it turned out, the report was wrong — very wrong. Exactly none of those features actually arrived in either the “iPhone 4S” Apple announced in October 2011, or the real “iPhone 5” that debuted in September 2012. The report also didn’t forecast actual iPhone design trends in any useful way. From my standpoint, that’s the critical difference between most Apple rumors and the ones that are actually worth caring about: some early information, even if it’s imprecise, can help you make a better buying decision about an Apple product today or six months down the line.

A small group of nitpickers — notably including people who are fed information directly by Apple, off-the-record — have been taking shots at people who report independently-researched rumors, attempting to undermine the value of big, “not from Apple” scoops versus small, “not (officially) from Apple” tidbits. This may be an inside baseball topic that most people really don’t care about, but it’s worth at least considering for a moment…

It’s easy to take cheap shots, for instance, at KGI’s widely-read analyst Ming Chi Kuo. Kuo once worked at DigiTimes, a Taiwanese publication with a very checkered reputation for forecasting future Apple products, and like virtually everyone who has reported on upcoming Apple products, his personal, post-DigiTimes track record of predictions isn’t perfect. He tends to get product concepts and basic specifications right — no simple feat — but is less reliable on timing, implementation and other specifics.

Having watched Apple for years, this doesn’t surprise me. Contrary to what the nitpickers suggest, Apple has delayed products at the eleventh hour or the very last minute over issues such as quality control, component shortages, or problems with either partners or software. As a rare public example of this, the white iPhone 4 actually got announced but went unshipped for months; less publicly (but still reported by business publications), a major, long-awaited Apple TV update was held up by problematic negotiations with cable companies and content providers. No matter how good Kuo is at forecasting design and engineering changes, manufacturing and distribution involve a lot of moving pieces, and delays are just a reality.

So even if nitpickers want to downplay some of the specifics in Kuo’s reports, they serve a useful purpose for consumers: providing a good general sense of what’s coming up in the future. I would argue that it’s highly valuable for the marketplace to know in advance that the next iPhone will probably include Force Touch, and that it will be an important feature for the device, even if the specifics of how the technology works prove (months later) not to be accurate. People deserve to be able to make an informed decision about whether to buy what’s on the market now or hold off for a personally important feature that might be coming next.

Apple clearly doesn’t like when people delay their purchases — Steve Jobs once lamented that people can get trapped in endless cycles of waiting for what’s next, rather than buying now — but that’s Apple’s perspective as a company that makes money only when it sells things. To that end, Apple has a popular web site, gigantic marketing budget, and teams of people dedicated to selling products. I seriously wonder about any supposedly independent writer who sees it as his or her mission to push Apple’s code of pseudo-secrecy on other journalists, bloggers, or analysts.

It’s not Kuo’s job to carry water for Apple; it’s his job to forecast what Apple is likely to do next, for the speculative benefit of the investment community and public at large. Even if he’s not right all the time, his work provides valuable food for thought, and lets millions of people make more informed — if not perfectly informed — decisions about how to spend their money. I’m glad he does what he does, critics be damned.

More From This Author

Check out more of my editorials, How-To guides, and reviews for 9to5Mac here! I’ve covered a lot of different topics of interest to Mac, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Apple TV, and Apple Watch users. 


Filed under: AAPL Company, Opinion Tagged: AAPL, Apple, DigiTimes, KGI, Ming-Chi Kuo

Continue reading more about AAPL Company, Apple, and AAPL at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Opinion: Apple rumors can be valuable forecasts of future trends, even if they’re imprecise" with our community.

Comments Off on Opinion: Apple rumors can be valuable forecasts of future trends, even if they’re imprecise

Photo

Jeremy Horwitz

November 6th

Apple

Mac

Digitimes still thinks the Retina MacBook Air is coming tomorrow, says Apple logos going 3D

retina-macbook-air

Digitimes still seems to think the long-rumored 12-inch Retina MacBook Air is going to be announced tomorrow, claiming that shipments have already begun.

Shipments of a new MacBook Air model, reportedly equipped with a 12-inch Retina screen, have begun in small volumes and large-volume shipments will begin in November, according to Taiwan-based supply chain makers.

The claim seems highly unlikely given that just two days ago Re/code cited Apple sources as specifically stating that, while the product was in the pipeline, it would not be shown at tomorrow’s event … 

Early rumors suggest that the 12-inch rMBA will use a more power-efficient Broadwell processor allowing it to ditch the fan, and to drop a clickable trackpad in favor of taps and gestures alone.

More recent rumors have echoed the fanless design, suggested a slimmer form-factor and claimed that thinner bezels would allow the machine to have exterior dimensions close to that of the existing non-Retina 11-inch MacBook Air.

Other suggestions include a reversible Type C USB port (which seems likely) and dropping the MagSafe connector, which would be odd if true – the worry-free power connector has long been seen as a key feature of Apple’s MacBooks.

A second claim in the same Digitimes piece is that Apple will be revamping its logo in future devices.

Apple is also planning to upgrade the technologies used for printing its logo onto devices and will use laser cutting and unique embedded technologies to make the logo 3D-like and shine at the edges. All Apple’s products will feature the new logo in 2015, starting with the next-generation iMac, the sources detailed.

I can actually see some logic to the idea – all MacBooks from recent years look pretty much indistinguishable to the casual observer, so perhaps a visual difference would be enough to encourage those who like to be seen to be using the latest and greatest models to upgrade.

Again, though, we’ve heard nothing else about this from our own sources or elsewhere, so given the source, we’re not holding our breath.


Filed under: AAPL Company, Mac Tagged: 12-inch MacBook Air, 12-inch single, Apple, DigiTimes, iMac, MacBook, MacBook Air, MagSafe, Retina MacBook Air, Taiwan

For more news on AAPL Company, Apple, and MacBook continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Digitimes still thinks the Retina MacBook Air is coming tomorrow, says Apple logos going 3D" with our community.

Comments Off on Digitimes still thinks the Retina MacBook Air is coming tomorrow, says Apple logos going 3D

Photo

Ben Lovejoy

October 15th

Apple

Mac

Digitimes says iPhone 6 Plus accounting for 60% of iPhone 6 shipments, but usage stats suggest otherwise

Screen Shot 2014-10-03 at 11.01.28

A new report by Digitimes says that, contrary to public opinion, the iPhone 6 Plus is receiving more orders after beating initial demand expectations. The report says 60% of iPhone production is iPhone 6 Plus units, which may be interpreted as the iPhone 6 Plus being the more popular model. It also says that Foxconn is responsible for iPhone 6 Plus supply, whereas Pegatron is taking up iPhone 6 output.

However, Digitimes doesn’t have the best track record and this information sort of defies other evidence. Firstly, it is important to note that production does not correlate proportionally to demand. It was well publicised that the iPhone 6 Plus was supply-constrained in the runup to release. The burst of iPhone 6 Plus production now may simply be restoring the balance, clearing the backlog of orders.

Moreover, web analytics clearly show that the iPhone 6 is the much more popular device. As shown above, Mixpanel says that the iPhone 6 currently represents 5% of total iPhone usage on the web. Although the share of 6 Plus has been climbing, it remains below 1.2%. With both models of the iPhone consistently out of stock, usage should roughly equal the phone production ratios. Something doesn’t add up.

On price theory alone, it is likely that the iPhone 6 will remain the more popular model, as it is more accessible to more people. That being said, there is a third explanation for the dominance of the iPhone 6 Plus. Later this month, Apple will release the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus in China. Apple may have found that this market finds the larger 5.5 inch device more appealing and is readjusting production to meet pent-up demand for the Chinese launch, which has already attracted 2 million phone reservations.

Although not impossible, it would be very surprising to expect the Plus  to continue to represent 60% of total iPhone 6 production. Tim Cook has previously said to not trust supply reports from just one study. This feels like one of these instances.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: DigiTimes, iPhone, iphone 6 plus, production, supply

For more news on AAPL Company, iOS Devices, and iPhone continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Digitimes says iPhone 6 Plus accounting for 60% of iPhone 6 shipments, but usage stats suggest otherwise" with our community.

Comments Off on Digitimes says iPhone 6 Plus accounting for 60% of iPhone 6 shipments, but usage stats suggest otherwise

Photo

Benjamin Mayo

October 3rd

Apple

Mac

Sketchy supply-chain report says production gearing-up for 80M iPhone 6 sales this year

iphone-6-sales

DigiTimes is citing supply-chain sources as stating that Apple is gearing-up its iPhone 6 production plans for an anticipated 80 million sales by year-end. If achieved, it would represent 33 percent year-on-year growth.

Makers in the iPhone supply chain are preparing parts and components for production of up to 80 million units of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus before year-end 2014, according to sources at Taiwan-based iPhone supply chain.

As ever with DigiTimes, the number should be taken with a large dose of salt: while manufacturers will be aware of their own order-books from Apple, and thus have some degree of insight into the company’s expectations for early sales, it’s a stretch to extrapolate from that to sales targets up to the end of the year.

We won’t have too long to wait for a good indication of how well the new models are selling. They go on sale on Friday 19th, and Apple is expected to issue its usual announcement of opening weekend sales on Monday 22nd September. Last year, Apple announced a record 9M iPhone sales in the first three days.

This year’s opening weekend numbers may take a hit, however, with the New York Times reporting that regulatory problems may mean the new models won’t go on sale in China – a massive market – on 19th September.

Via Business Insider


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices Tagged: AAPL, Apple, china, DigiTimes, Friday, iPhone, iPhone 6, iphone 6 plus, iPhone 6 sales, iPhone sales, New York Times, Supply chain, Taiwan

For more information about AAPL Company, iOS Devices, and Apple continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Sketchy supply-chain report says production gearing-up for 80M iPhone 6 sales this year" with our community.

Comments Off on Sketchy supply-chain report says production gearing-up for 80M iPhone 6 sales this year

Photo

Ben Lovejoy

September 11th

Apple

Mac

Digitimes says iPad Air 2 will be ‘thinner’ and have ‘improved fingerprint recognition’

 

Screenshot 2014-09-03 09.43.44

Says Digitimes:

Touch panel makers TPK and GIS are among some of the makers receiving orders from Apple for full-lamination units. Sources said the new model will remain unchanged in terms of size and resolution, but that it will be thinner, equipped with an enhanced processor, and contain improved fingerprint recognition features.

Two problems there (at least).

1) The current batch of physical mockups/leaks indicate that the new iPad Air will look mostly the same as the current version, and that it will be roughly the same thinness. You can tell in the image above that the new model (on the top) is only very slightly skinner.

2) How can the fingerprint sensor be “improved” if it never existed in the first place? Nonetheless, we’re hearing the new model does include a Touch ID sensor, like the iPhone.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, DigiTimes, Fingerprint recognition, GIS, iPad, iPhone, iPhone 5, Touchscreen

Continue reading more about AAPL Company, iOS Devices, and Apple at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Digitimes says iPad Air 2 will be ‘thinner’ and have ‘improved fingerprint recognition’" with our community.

Comments Off on Digitimes says iPad Air 2 will be ‘thinner’ and have ‘improved fingerprint recognition’

Photo

Mark Gurman

September 3rd

Apple

Mac

Unconfirmed reports that Pegatron is making half the 4.7-inch models of the iPhone 6

iphone6

Digitimes is reporting that Pegatron is making half of the 4.7-inch model of the iPhone 6, at least for orders placed in 2014. Citing upstream suppliers (those making components for delivery to the assembly plants), it’s rumored that Apple has asked Pegatron to make 25M of its initial order of 50M phones, with primary supplier Foxconn making the rest – along with all of the 5.5-inch models.

Taiwan’s Commercial Times had originally suggested that Pegatron would be receiving only 15 percent of orders, while DigiTimes said back in May that it was 30 percent – the same source that now says 50 percent. If you’re thinking all this suggests they are simply plucking numbers out of the air, you may well be right.

Either way, we’re expecting Apple to finally unveil the long-awaited iPhone 6 on 9th September. Recent claimed leaked parts have shown tapered edges on the display panel and the power button moved from the top to the side of the phone; a raised camera cutout; and a single, circular True Tone flash.

We’ve heard sketchy rumors about the battery capacity, and the same rumors about NFC we hear every year.

Everything we’ve seen does, though, point to a significantly slimmer and more rounded design.


Filed under: AAPL Company, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, Commercial Times, DigiTimes, Foxconn, iPhone, iPhone 6, Pegatron, Taiwan

Continue reading more about AAPL Company, iOS Devices, and Apple at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Unconfirmed reports that Pegatron is making half the 4.7-inch models of the iPhone 6" with our community.

Comments Off on Unconfirmed reports that Pegatron is making half the 4.7-inch models of the iPhone 6

Photo

Ben Lovejoy

August 14th

Apple

Mac

Samsung’s SoC profits down as Apple chooses TSMC for A8, although rumor says it will produce processors for iPhone 7

a7-apple

Samsung has been having some issues lately, reporting falling profits in the most recent quarter. Although most of this is due to shrinking growth in phone sales, where Apple continues to dominate in terms of profit share, Apple has also affected Samsung’s income from its microprocessor production business. With TSMC having exclusivity over Apple’s A8 production, to be used in the upcoming iPhone 6, Samsung’s outlook for ‘logic chips’ is also gloomy, as the Wall Street Journal highlights in a new report.

Samsung executives admitted on a recent conference call that the outlook isn’t so bright for this business.

“Sales and profitability from System LSI (logic chip business) worsened as demand from main customers continued to decline,” Robert Yi, Samsung’s head of investor relations said last week. His comments confirmed, albeit indirectly, how Apple’s gradual shift away from Samsung as a customer of microprocessors was eating into its profits.

It has been widely reported that Apple and Samsung’s relationship in the courtroom has caused Apple to look for ways to distance itself from its rival. Until this cycle of iOS devices, however, all of Apple’s SoC’s (the A4 through A7) have been manufactured at Samsung foundries, for yield and technological reasons. The A8, though, will be manufactured by TSMC.

Sales of Samsung’s own line of mobile processor chips, the Exynos line, has also been weak. There is some potentially good news on the horizon, however. A new report posted by the Economic Daily News claims that Samsung has snagged production of Apple’s next-generation iOS processor, ostensibly named the ‘A9′. The validity of the rumor is very questionable at this early stage of course, as it is not clear why Apple would go back to Samsung so quickly. However, this rumor does corroborate with a DigiTimes study from July, which said Apple is looking to use 14 nanometer processes for the A9 SoC, something which Samsung foundries are already set up to do.

Last month, TSMC began shipping its A8 chips as part of the iPhone 6 production ramp. According to the Wall Street Journal, the chips are produced using a 20 nanometer process.


Filed under: iOS, iOS Devices Tagged: Apple, DigiTimes, Exynos, iOS, iPhone, Samsung, TSMC, Wall Street Journal

For more news on iOS Devices, Apple, and iPhone continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Samsung’s SoC profits down as Apple chooses TSMC for A8, although rumor says it will produce processors for iPhone 7" with our community.

Comments Off on Samsung’s SoC profits down as Apple chooses TSMC for A8, although rumor says it will produce processors for iPhone 7

Photo

Benjamin Mayo

August 5th

Apple

Mac
line
July 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031