Archive for day September 12th, 2011

Everpix: All Your Photos, Automatically Organized And Accessible From Anywhere

tcdisrupt_sf11-5-11-1

TechCrunch Disrupt finalist Everpix is a new service that automatically organizes and combines all your photo libraries into an elegant interface, whether they’re stored on the desktop or in the cloud. It supports traditional desktop software programs, like Adobe Lightroom, Aperture and iPhoto, for example, as well as online services like Facebook, Flickr, Picasa and Instagram. It will soon be able to automatically upload photos from all your mobile devices, too. And it even supports integration with Gmail.

Everpix runs as a little utility on your computer (Mac-only for now), fetching the photos from online services and local galleries. You can configure which folders it should monitor, so it won’t import all the photos on your hard drive, and the online services you use. With the Gmail integration, Everpix discovers the photos sent you via email and organizes them along with the others. In a later release, IMAP support will be added to support other email programs.

After the photos are imported, Everpix uses a feature called “assistive curating” to create attractively laid-out album groupings called “Moments.” These are similar to iPhoto’s “Events,” but are built for you automatically, which saves you from the hassle of album creation and organization. Not surprisingly, you can see an Apple-like design aesthetic here, given that two of Everpix’s Co-founders, Pierre-Olivier Latour and Kevin Quennesson, each spent several years with the company. Meanwhile, the third Co-founder, Wayne Fan, was previously at frog design.

The service can also detect bad photos, like those that are blurry, out of focus, or under or overexposed. These photos are automatically hidden from view, but you can choose to unhide them, if desired.

By default, all photos on Everpix’s Web interface are private, but you can make a collection public with just one click, or you can simply click which photos in a collection you want to share.

Everpix includes a social component, too, allowing you to connect with other users, like family members for example, so you can immediately see their new photos without any need for them to first organize them, email them, or upload them to a service like Facebook.

The best part about Everpix, however, may be it’s “set it and forget it” nature. After the one-time installation and configuration, there’s nothing else you have to do. You can continue to work with your photos as you would normally, saving them to your same folders, uploading the ones you want to share to the services you prefer, etc. But when you want to refer back to your entire photo collection, Everpix is there, with every photo you ever took in one central interface, available on the Web or, soon, on mobile.

Everpix will launch first for Mac and iOS, with support for online services limited to Facebook and Gmail initially. Windows and Android versions are in the works. The company’s business model will be freemium, but the pricing structure has not yet been determined.

The company, which was founded under the name “33Cube,” is currently in the process of raising seed funding from 500 Startups and other unnamed angel investors.

You can sign up to participate in the private alpha on the Everpix homepage here. 100 people, chosen at random, will be invited to join the early tests.

Judges Q&A

Expert Judges: Aileen Lee (Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers), Dustin Moskovitz (Asana), Michael Parekh (MPi Capital), Joshua Schachter (Jig)

DM: Looks beautiful, but rubbed the wrong way by name “Everpix.” Also, I’m Path investor. Not entirely original. What’s the longer term vision?

A: We want to build something where you get a bunch of photos and we extract the best ones.

JS: It’s 2011, but there’s yet to be a photo-sharing service with returns investors would look for. How to be something we need? Do people care about long-term photo storage?

A: So many people use email for photo-sharing. But we grab photos from all your devices too. You don’t have to change your behavior – if you email photos, that’s fine. They’re all in Everpix’s cloud.

AL: Who is initial target market?

A: Everyone who doesn’t want to hassle with photos.

MP: Business model? Infinite storage?

A: Freemium, we don’t know limit yet.


Company: Everpix
Website: everpix.net

Everpix automagically uploads and organizes all your photos in the cloud so you can view, rediscover and share them! Taking photos is fun, viewing them is fun, but everything else in between still sucks. People have lots of photos in various libraries and devices, accessing and organizing them is a pain, and putting them online or sharing them is cumbersome. Compare with the breath of fresh air that Everpix is: • All your photos are accessible from anywhere in a beautifully simple...

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Sarah Perez

September 12th

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With Bitcasa, The Entire Cloud Is Your Hard Drive For Only $10 Per Month

bitcasa-logo

The cloud is now your hard drive. And not just a few dozen Gigabytes, Terabytes or even Petabytes, but all of it – infinite storage – for only $10 per month. This is the incredible promise of the new TechCrunch Disrupt finalist Bitcasa.

The company is launching a new cloud storage, syncing and sharing service that blows away its competitors, including hard drive manufacturers and online services like DropBox and SkyDrive, with ease. In fact, beyond the pricing and limitless storage, the most disruptive thing about the service is its complete integration with your device. You don’t see it, it’s not an icon on your desktop, you don’t drag-and-drop files or folders into it. Instead, you write to the cloud when you save a file on your computer. The cloud is your hard drive, and your actual hard drive is just the cache.

The idea of using the cloud to store files or sync files between devices is not new. Dropbox, SkyDrive, Google Docs, Amazon and countless others have been offering online storage for some time. Plus, companies like Mozy, Carbonite and Backblaze use the cloud to back up your files. Other services, like Megaupload or YouSendIt revolve around sharing files through the cloud.

But Bitcasa is not like any of those services. It doesn’t move files around. It doesn’t sync files. It deals in bits and bytes, the 1′s and 0′s of digital data.

When you save a file, Bitcasa writes those 1′s and 0′s to its server-side infrastructure in the cloud. It doesn’t know anything about the file itself, really. It doesn’t see the file’s title or know its contents. It doesn’t know who wrote the file. And because the data is encrypted on the client side, Bitcasa doesn’t even know what it’s storing.

So if you want to cloud-enable your 80 GB collection of MP3′s or a terabyte of movies (acquired mainly through torrenting, naughty you!), go ahead. Even if the RIAA and MPAA came knocking on Bitcasa’s doors, subpoenas in hand, all Bitcasa would have is a collection of encrypted bits with no means to decrypt them.

If you’re still having a hard time wrapping your head around this idea, think of it like this: instead of relying on the fallible and limited hard drive in your computer (or soon, your phone), your data is stored on an array of thousands of hard drives and streamed to you on demand. And in order to deal with the “offline” problem, the files you use the most are intelligently cached on your computer, allowing you to work when the cloud goes down, which is rare, as well as when you don’t have an Internet connection, which is more common.

Sharing files via Bitcasa is simple too: just copy and paste a file’s or folder’s link (a URL, available on right-click) and send to someone via email, IM or some other service. They click the link to have the file delivered directly to their desktop.

And the pricing! How on earth is it so cheap?

That’s the easy part, actually. Explains Bitcasa CEO Tony Gauda, $10/month still gives the company large margins. The fact is, 60% of your data is duplicate. If you have an MP3 file, someone else probably has the same one, for example. Each person only tends to have around 25 GB of unique, personal data, he says. Using patented de-duplication algorithms, compression techniques and encryption, Bitcasa keeps costs down (way, way down, but that’s it’s secret sauce), which is what makes it so affordable. Bitcasa also explained that a freemium model is on its way with less-than-unlimited storage for free.

This service sounds almost too good to be true, leaving us with questions that need still need to be answered. Does it really work? Does it slow down your computer? Can it scale? The company is positive it’s ready, but we need to see it to believe it.

Bitcasa currently has 20 patents for its technology and plans to add more in the future. It will also offer mobile applications that run in the background to do on mobile what it does on the desktop today. And it will work on other features, like real-time video transcoding, so your movies can stream to any device, without any manual effort on your part. There are even more things in the works, too, but those are being kept tightly under wraps for now.

The Bitcasa founders include CEO Tony Gauda, Joel Andren and Kevin Blackham, whose combined work experience includes time spent at MasterCard, VeriSign, Classmates.com, Mozy and more. In total, Bitcasa has raised $1.3 million from from Andreeson Horowitz, First Round Capital and Pelion Venture Partners.

Bitcasa will be free while in limited beta trials. You can sign up for access here.

Disclosure: CrunchFund is an investor in Bitcasa. 

Expert Judges: Aileen Lee (Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers), Dustin Moskovitz (Asana), Michael Parekh (MPi Capital), Joshua Schachter (Jig)

MP: Sounds terrific. What’s the secret sauce?

A: We have 20 patents. Most interesting, predictive capability – knows what you need before you need it. Users don’t have to do anything differently.

DM: Market research on who needs this? (People already using online services)

A: Really about managing your data. You don’t have to worry about managing your data anymore.

AL: How to compete with Apple, Amazon, Google?

A: We’re only focused on storage. We’re cross-platform. Apple’s product would only work with Apple products, for example.

JS: Can you stream movies not cached?

A: If you have bandwidth to support it. But our cache is very intelligent. Plus, people over estimate the size of data they have.

MP: Limits to use?

Each user has own account, and can share a link (file, folder) with other users. But can’t share a file to entire Internet.


:
Website:

Learn more


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Sarah Perez

September 12th

Uncategorized

With Bitcasa, The Entire Cloud Is Your Hard Drive For Only $10 Per Month

bitcasa-logo

The cloud is now your hard drive. And not just a few dozen Gigabytes, Terabytes or even Petabytes, but all of it – infinite storage – for only $10 per month. This is the incredible promise of the new TechCrunch Disrupt finalist Bitcasa.

The company is launching a new cloud storage, syncing and sharing service that blows away its competitors, including hard drive manufacturers and online services like DropBox and SkyDrive, with ease. In fact, beyond the pricing and limitless storage, the most disruptive thing about the service is its complete integration with your device. You don’t see it, it’s not an icon on your desktop, you don’t drag-and-drop files or folders into it. Instead, you write to the cloud when you save a file on your computer. The cloud is your hard drive, and your actual hard drive is just the cache.

The idea of using the cloud to store files or sync files between devices is not new. Dropbox, SkyDrive, Google Docs, Amazon and countless others have been offering online storage for some time. Plus, companies like Mozy, Carbonite and Backblaze use the cloud to back up your files. Other services, like Megaupload or YouSendIt revolve around sharing files through the cloud.

But Bitcasa is not like any of those services. It doesn’t move files around. It doesn’t sync files. It deals in bits and bytes, the 1′s and 0′s of digital data.

When you save a file, Bitcasa writes those 1′s and 0′s to its server-side infrastructure in the cloud. It doesn’t know anything about the file itself, really. It doesn’t see the file’s title or know its contents. It doesn’t know who wrote the file. And because the data is encrypted on the client side, Bitcasa doesn’t even know what it’s storing.

So if you want to cloud-enable your 80 GB collection of MP3′s or a terabyte of movies (acquired mainly through torrenting, naughty you!), go ahead. Even if the RIAA and MPAA came knocking on Bitcasa’s doors, subpoenas in hand, all Bitcasa would have is a collection of encrypted bits with no means to decrypt them.

If you’re still having a hard time wrapping your head around this idea, think of it like this: instead of relying on the fallible and limited hard drive in your computer (or soon, your phone), your data is stored on an array of thousands of hard drives and streamed to you on demand. And in order to deal with the “offline” problem, the files you use the most are intelligently cached on your computer, allowing you to work when the cloud goes down, which is rare, as well as when you don’t have an Internet connection, which is more common.

Sharing files via Bitcasa is simple too: just copy and paste a file’s or folder’s link (a URL, available on right-click) and send to someone via email, IM or some other service. They click the link to have the file delivered directly to their desktop.

And the pricing! How on earth is it so cheap?

That’s the easy part, actually. Explains Bitcasa CEO Tony Gauda, $10/month still gives the company large margins. The fact is, 60% of your data is duplicate. If you have an MP3 file, someone else probably has the same one, for example. Each person only tends to have around 25 GB of unique, personal data, he says. Using patented de-duplication algorithms, compression techniques and encryption, Bitcasa keeps costs down (way, way down, but that’s it’s secret sauce), which is what makes it so affordable. Bitcasa also explained that a freemium model is on its way with less-than-unlimited storage for free.

This service sounds almost too good to be true, leaving us with questions that need still need to be answered. Does it really work? Does it slow down your computer? Can it scale? The company is positive it’s ready, but we need to see it to believe it.

Bitcasa currently has 20 patents for its technology and plans to add more in the future. It will also offer mobile applications that run in the background to do on mobile what it does on the desktop today. And it will work on other features, like real-time video transcoding, so your movies can stream to any device, without any manual effort on your part. There are even more things in the works, too, but those are being kept tightly under wraps for now.

The Bitcasa founders include CEO Tony Gauda, Joel Andren and Kevin Blackham, whose combined work experience includes time spent at MasterCard, VeriSign, Classmates.com, Mozy and more. In total, Bitcasa has raised $1.3 million from from Andreeson Horowitz, First Round Capital and Pelion Venture Partners.

Bitcasa will be free while in limited beta trials. You can sign up for access here.

Disclosure: CrunchFund is an investor in Bitcasa. 

Expert Judges: Aileen Lee (Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers), Dustin Moskovitz (Asana), Michael Parekh (MPi Capital), Joshua Schachter (Jig)

MP: Sounds terrific. What’s the secret sauce?

A: We have 20 patents. Most interesting, predictive capability – knows what you need before you need it. Users don’t have to do anything differently.

DM: Market research on who needs this? (People already using online services)

A: Really about managing your data. You don’t have to worry about managing your data anymore.

AL: How to compete with Apple, Amazon, Google?

A: We’re only focused on storage. We’re cross-platform. Apple’s product would only work with Apple products, for example.

JS: Can you stream movies not cached?

A: If you have bandwidth to support it. But our cache is very intelligent. Plus, people over estimate the size of data they have.

MP: Limits to use?

Each user has own account, and can share a link (file, folder) with other users. But can’t share a file to entire Internet.


:
Website:

Learn more


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Sarah Perez

September 12th

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Navy Commander Fired after Shooting at Innocent Fishing Boat [War]

Hey, everyone screws up at work sometimes. It's natural. It's normal. It's usually not a big deal—unless you're commanding a Navy destroyer, and start lobbing shells at a local fishing boat off the coast of North Carolina. Darn! More »


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Sam Biddle

September 12th

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Pressly Turns Websites Into Tablet-Friendly HTML5 Web Apps

tcdisrupt_sf11-2-23-1


TechCrunch Disrupt finalist Pressly is an HTML5-based platform that turns online publications into tablet-friendly websites that work on the iPad, Android tablets or the BlackBerry PlayBook. The sites it produces are nearly indistinguishable from their native counterparts, like Flipboard and Zite for example, offering a similar experience for browsing through articles, images and videos. Navigation is designed for the tablet interface, using common gestures like multi-touch swipes and pinches.

Pressly’s platform includes five customizable templates as a starting point, each designed with the needs of different publishers in mind. One template is more text-driven, while others are better for browsing through photos or videos. Like native apps, navigating a Pressly-built site uses intuitive gestures, like a 2-finger swipe up or down to reveal quick navigation and a pinch to close articles.

The templating engine can pull in a variety of data feeds, too, like JSON, XML, RSS or Twitter and WordPress content.

Despite the end product’s similarities to today’s popular tablet magazines, Pressly isn’t designed to be an alternative to building a native app for the iPad or another tablet. In fact, the company isn’t even a big proponent of saving URLs as homescreen icons. Instead, Pressly wants to leverage the popularity of tablets’ most popular application, the browser, to immediately deliver tablet-optimized experiences to those surfing the Web.

In addition, because these sites are just HTML pages, publishers can integrate all the common functions found in a traditional website, including analytics, advertising, payment processing, store finders and more. And Pressly includes its own ad platform which lets publishers and advertisers insert rich media ads into the tablet-friendly site. These ads can include videos, photos, links, hot spots, social sharing buttons, detailed tracking mechanisms and they can even be displayed as 360-degree immersive views.

Pressly is currently working with Canadian Living Magazine, Transcontinental Media Group and The Toronto Star (Canada’s largest daily) as well as with the The Economist’s digital team in New York on a new, yet-to-be-announced product prototype.

If you’re on a tablet computer, you can see a demo of Pressly in action here.

The company’s founders include CEO Jeff Brenner, CTO Peter Kieltyka, Marketing and Media Lead Tobin Dalrymple and Business Development Lead Chi Chen. Brenner and Kieltyka previously founded a consulting business called NuLayer, which built over 17 successful Web and iOS projects including the popular sports app for theScore, as well as social photo sharing startup Crowdreel, winner of the 2009 Twitter Chirp conference.

NuLayer has a minority partner in theScore, but Pressly itself has no direct funding. Pricing for the platform has yet to be determined.

Judges Q&A

Expert Judges: Aileen Lee (Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers), Dustin Moskovitz (Asana), Michael Parekh (MPi Capital), Joshua Schachter (Jig)

AL: Really beautiful. Need to focus on certain verticals.

A: We feel publishers need this. This isn’t competing with Flipboard directly.

DM: I’m Flipboard investor, not sure your product is there yet.

A: Flipboard is iPad. Pressly is a Web tech (HTML5). Also, publishers can control content better. There’s room for us. Flipboard does content discovery on iPad, Pressly uses Safari or a Web browser to deliver tablet-friendly site.

MP: From user perspective, looks great. Biz model question about revenue share.

A: No upfront costs on revenue share with publishers - a win-win situation for both. If consumers love and is engaging, publishers can increase CPM’s. Can start bringing ad inventory to publishers.

JS: I like the ads. Worry is people with dev shops can build whatever they want, leaving you with newspapers, those without tools to build this.

A: Built platform where publishers can build on top of. Publishers are good at telling stories, not great at innovating like this.


Company: Pressly
Website: pressly.com
Launch Date: September 13, 2011

Pressly is an HTML5 publishing platform that automatically transforms online content, such as RSS feeds and social content, into interactive, cleanly-designed web apps for tablet web browsers. Pressly is currently optimized for the iPad. Pressly’s web apps give publishers an easy, turn-key vehicle for displaying full-page, stylish tablet advertisements, that are more engaging than traditional online ads and are more effective with readers.

Learn more


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Photo

Sarah Perez

September 12th

Uncategorized

Pressly Turns Websites Into Tablet-Friendly HTML5 Web Apps

tcdisrupt_sf11-2-23-1

TechCrunch Disrupt finalist Pressly is an HTML5-based platform that turns online publications into tablet-friendly websites that work on the iPad, Android tablets or the BlackBerry PlayBook. The sites it produces are nearly indistinguishable from their native counterparts, like Flipboard and Zite for example, offering a similar experience for browsing through articles, images and videos. Navigation is designed for the tablet interface, using common gestures like multi-touch swipes and pinches.

Pressly’s platform includes five customizable templates as a starting point, each designed with the needs of different publishers in mind. One template is more text-driven, while others are better for browsing through photos or videos. Like native apps, navigating a Pressly-built site uses intuitive gestures, like a 2-finger swipe up or down to reveal quick navigation and a pinch to close articles.

The templating engine can pull in a variety of data feeds, too, like JSON, XML, RSS or Twitter and WordPress content.

Despite the end product’s similarities to today’s popular tablet magazines, Pressly isn’t designed to be an alternative to building a native app for the iPad or another tablet. In fact, the company isn’t even a big proponent of saving URLs as homescreen icons. Instead, Pressly wants to leverage the popularity of tablets’ most popular application, the browser, to immediately deliver tablet-optimized experiences to those surfing the Web.

In addition, because these sites are just HTML pages, publishers can integrate all the common functions found in a traditional website, including analytics, advertising, payment processing, store finders and more. And Pressly includes its own ad platform which lets publishers and advertisers insert rich media ads into the tablet-friendly site. These ads can include videos, photos, links, hot spots, social sharing buttons, detailed tracking mechanisms and they can even be displayed as 360-degree immersive views.

Pressly is currently working with Canadian Living Magazine, Transcontinental Media Group and The Toronto Star (Canada’s largest daily) as well as with the The Economist’s digital team in New York on a new, yet-to-be-announced product prototype.

If you’re on a tablet computer, you can see a demo of Pressly in action here.

The company’s founders include CEO Jeff Brenner, CTO Peter Kieltyka, Marketing and Media Lead Tobin Dalrymple and Business Development Lead Chi Chen. Brenner and Kieltyka previously founded a consulting business called NuLayer, which built over 17 successful Web and iOS projects including the popular sports app for theScore, as well as social photo sharing startup Crowdreel, winner of the 2009 Twitter Chirp conference.

NuLayer has a minority partner in theScore, but Pressly itself has no direct funding. Pricing for the platform has yet to be determined.

Judges Q&A

Expert Judges: Aileen Lee (Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers), Dustin Moskovitz (Asana), Michael Parekh (MPi Capital), Joshua Schachter (Jig)

AL: Really beautiful. Need to focus on certain verticals.

A: We feel publishers need this. This isn’t competing with Flipboard directly.

DM: I’m Flipboard investor, not sure your product is there yet.

A: Flipboard is iPad. Pressly is a Web tech (HTML5). Also, publishers can control content better. There’s room for us. Flipboard does content discovery on iPad, Pressly uses Safari or a Web browser to deliver tablet-friendly site.

MP: From user perspective, looks great. Biz model question about revenue share.

A: No upfront costs on revenue share with publishers - a win-win situation for both. If consumers love and is engaging, publishers can increase CPM’s. Can start bringing ad inventory to publishers.

JS: I like the ads. Worry is people with dev shops can build whatever they want, leaving you with newspapers, those without tools to build this.

A: Built platform where publishers can build on top of. Publishers are good at telling stories, not great at innovating like this.


Company: Pressly
Website: pressly.com
Launch Date: September 13, 2011

Pressly is an HTML5 publishing platform that automatically transforms online content, such as RSS feeds and social content, into interactive, cleanly-designed web apps for tablet web browsers. Pressly is currently optimized for the iPad. Pressly’s web apps give publishers an easy, turn-key vehicle for displaying full-page, stylish tablet advertisements, that are more engaging than traditional online ads and are more effective with readers.

Learn more


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Sarah Perez

September 12th

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A Bike That’ll Break When Stolen [Bicycles]

Andrew Leinonen created the ultimate deterrent to bicycle theft - a lock that's integrated into the bicycle's frame. He calls his invention the StayLocked Bike. More »


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Kelly Hodgkins

September 12th

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Verious Launches First Marketplace For Mobile App Components

verious_logo

Today, TechCrunch Disrupt finalist Verious is launching the world’s first marketplace for mobile application components – that is, the libraries, the SDKs (software development kits), the add-ons, the open source code and other third-party services which specifically cater to mobile app developers. Until now, there hasn’t been a centralized repository of these resources.

But Verious isn’t just organizing mobile app components on its site, it’s also offering a way for developers to sell their components to others through a copy-protected licensing system.

According to analysts, the market for mobile application development services is expected to reach $100 billion by 2015, as many independent developers are now working on a combination of consumer-facing apps alongside mobile app component development. That no one has thought to launch a service like this until now is actually somewhat surprising.

With Verious, the goal is to help developers speed their time to market by offering the components they need, but don’t have either the time or resources to build themselves. For example, there’s a 3D globe which consists of 20,000 lines of code, built over the course of 5 months with $50,000 worth of labor. It’s listed on the site for less than $1,000 to license.

Pre-launch, Verious’ founders talked to thousands of developers and have compiled a list of 1,000 components along with $100,000 worth of component requests. The size of this initial catalog demonstrates the need for such a service’s existence in the first place – there are a lot of mobile app components for developers to keep up with!

In addition to organizing the components on the site for easy discovery, mobile app developers are allowed to test out the components in a 30-day free trial. They can also post and “follow” component feature requests, so sellers know which ones to prioritize in their development to meet market demands. In the future, the ability to rate, review and comment on components will be added, too.

The site’s patent-pending License Manager lets sellers enforce different types of licensing models, including annual fees, perpetual fees, volume-based tiered pricing, source code buyout and more. Verious will charge a 20-40% commission on components (20% for charter developers), a referral fee for premier partners listings SDKs, and revenue share for server-side partners.

At launch, Verious supports iOS and Android, but will expand to other platforms as the market demands.

Verious’ management team is composed of industry veterans with CEO Anil Pereira, VP Marketing Don Pitt and Web Strategy/Ops head Michael Coleman. Their combined work experience includes time spent at VeriSign, American Express, DataSphere, VMWare, Samsung, Openwave and TRUSTe.

The company, founded in 2011, is backed by seed and angel investors including Charles River Ventures, X-G Ventures, Mark Britto, Iggy Fanlo, Gil Penchina, Krishna Vedati and others.

Judges Q&A

Expert Judges: Aileen Lee (Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers), Dustin Moskovitz (Asana), Michael Parekh (MPi Capital), Joshua Schachter (Jig)

AL: Estimation of addressable market?

A: 1) App services market – $100 B by 2015, plus app tools market – $30 B by 2015, according to analysts.

DM: Dev tools companies have failed to make business of it. Who is doing it well?

A: Plenty of companies doing marketplace models out there.

MP: Quality control? Rating system?

A: Developers have to produce a sample app with the code, or have an app on the App Store. Yes, ratings, reviews, community are coming.

JS: How to be first stop for developers?

A: Every day, companies are launching SDKs. Companies are working with Verious now to get their libraries listed. They want to be on site to grow their install base.


Company: Verious
Website: Verious.com
Launch Date: March 1, 2011
Funding: $800k

Verious is the world’s first marketplace for mobile app components, enabling developers to license pre-built, pre-tested libraries to accelerate time-to-market, access 3rd party content and increase in-app monetization. Verious serves as a lens on the Mobile App Development category so mobile app developers can find all the resources they need to accelerate their development efforts, in one place. Verious lists mobile application components for iOS and Android; mobile SDKs; mobile app development tools and services; and major open...

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Photo

Sarah Perez

September 12th

Uncategorized

Verious Launches First Marketplace For Mobile App Components

verious_logo

Today, TechCrunch Disrupt finalist Verious is launching the world’s first marketplace for mobile application components – that is, the libraries, the SDKs (software development kits), the add-ons, the open source code and other third-party services which specifically cater to mobile app developers. Until now, there hasn’t been a centralized repository of these resources.

But Verious isn’t just organizing mobile app components on its site, it’s also offering a way for developers to sell their components to others through a copy-protected licensing system.

According to analysts, the market for mobile application development services is expected to reach $100 billion by 2015, as many independent developers are now working on a combination of consumer-facing apps alongside mobile app component development. That no one has thought to launch a service like this until now is actually somewhat surprising.

With Verious, the goal is to help developers speed their time to market by offering the components they need, but don’t have either the time or resources to build themselves. For example, there’s a 3D globe which consists of 20,000 lines of code, built over the course of 5 months with $50,000 worth of labor. It’s listed on the site for less than $1,000 to license.

Pre-launch, Verious’ founders talked to thousands of developers and have compiled a list of 1,000 components along with $100,000 worth of component requests. The size of this initial catalog demonstrates the need for such a service’s existence in the first place – there are a lot of mobile app components for developers to keep up with!

In addition to organizing the components on the site for easy discovery, mobile app developers are allowed to test out the components in a 30-day free trial. They can also post and “follow” component feature requests, so sellers know which ones to prioritize in their development to meet market demands. In the future, the ability to rate, review and comment on components will be added, too.

The site’s patent-pending License Manager lets sellers enforce different types of licensing models, including annual fees, perpetual fees, volume-based tiered pricing, source code buyout and more. Verious doesn’t take an exact percentage of the fees, but rather will implement some sort of revenue-sharing or affiliate model in the future. A $99 per year membership will go into effect in the service’s second year as well.

At launch, Verious supports iOS and Android, but will expand to other platforms as the market demands.

Verious’ management team is composed of industry veterans with CEO Anil Pereira, VP Marketing Don Pitt and Web Strategy/Ops head Michael Coleman. Their combined work experience includes time spent at VeriSign, American Express, DataSphere, VMWare, Samsung, Openwave and TRUSTe.

The company, founded in 2011, is backed by seed and angel investors including Charles River Ventures, X-G Ventures, Mark Britto, Iggy Fanlo, Gil Penchina, Krishna Vedati and others.

Judges Q&A

Expert Judges: Aileen Lee (Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers), Dustin Moskovitz (Asana), Michael Parekh (MPi Capital), Joshua Schachter (Jig)

AL: Estimation of addressable market?

A: 1) App services market – $1 B by 2015, plus app tools market – $30 B by 2015, according to analysts.

DM: Dev tools companies have failed to make business of it. Who is doing it well?

A: Plenty of companies doing marketplace models out there.

MP: Quality control? Rating system?

A: Developers have to produce a sample app with the code, or have an app on the App Store. Yes, ratings, reviews, community are coming.

JS: How to be first stop for developers?

A: Every day, companies are launching SDKs. Companies are working with Verious now to get their libraries listed. They want to be on site to grow their install base.


Company: Verious
Website: Verious.com
Launch Date: March 1, 2011
Funding: $800k

Verious is the world’s first marketplace for mobile app components, enabling developers to license pre-built, pre-tested libraries to accelerate time-to-market, access 3rd party content and increase in-app monetization. Verious serves as a lens on the Mobile App Development category so mobile app developers can find all the resources they need to accelerate their development efforts, in one place. Verious lists mobile application components for iOS and Android; mobile SDKs; mobile app development tools and services; and major open...

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Sarah Perez

September 12th

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NTT DoCoMo, Samsung Talking Chipset Alliance Against Qualcomm

dosafunpan2

Qualcomm is one of biggest players (if not the biggest) in the mobile chipset space, and their dominance of the market is forcing other manufacturers to seek alternative strategies. While Qualcomm’s huge presence has helped shape the market, a group of Asian companies are looking to form an alliance that will reduce their reliance on Qualcomm’s products and instead develop and rely on their own.

NTT DoCoMo, Samsung, Fujitsu, NEC, and Panasonic Mobile Communications are currently negotiating the possibility of a joint venture that could start operations as early as next year, Reuters reports.

At the heart of their alliance is their need for baseband chipsets. It’s one of the most important components in a phone, as it allows the device to connect and transmit signals to network towers. Qualcomm owns nearly 80% of the baseband market, and this hegemonic hold is exactly what the alliance hopes to break free from.

If their alliance is formalized, NTT DoCoMo will own the majority stake, and the companies will jointly develop their own basebands to be used in each company’s forthcoming smartphones. The development costs will be split up between each company making the burden easier to bear, and should they decide to sell the chipsets to other companies, they all share in the rewards. While most of the companies are based in Japan and are unlikely to release phones using that baseband in the U.S., it’s very possible that the fruits of their labor may soon appear in a Samsung smartphone near you.

At first glance, it looks like a David(s) versus Goliath scenario, but the move seems more about self-sufficiency than to strike at Qualcomm. Who knows though? With enough gumption and their pooled engineering know-how, NTT SamFuNePan may someday give Qualcomm a run for their money.



Comments Off on NTT DoCoMo, Samsung Talking Chipset Alliance Against Qualcomm

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Chris Velazco

September 12th

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